Search sponsored by Coast Marketplace
Home Gazette Gazette News

More than 100 participate in 16th annual Visual Arts Camp in Cannon Beach

New classes include music, opportunities for adults
By Brenna Visser

The Daily Astorian

Published on July 12, 2018 3:49PM

Sierra Shea glues on a piece of paper onto her collage at the Visual Arts Camp hosted by the Cannon Beach Arts Association.

Brenna Visser/Cannon Beach Gazette

Sierra Shea glues on a piece of paper onto her collage at the Visual Arts Camp hosted by the Cannon Beach Arts Association.

Buy this photo
Sierra Shea and Jocelyn Johnson work on decoupaging a mushroom at the Visual Arts Camp hosted by the Cannon Beach Arts Association.

Brenna Visser/Cannon Beach Gazette

Sierra Shea and Jocelyn Johnson work on decoupaging a mushroom at the Visual Arts Camp hosted by the Cannon Beach Arts Association.

Buy this photo
Sierra Shea glues on a piece of paper onto her collage at the Visual Arts Camp hosted by the Cannon Beach Arts Association.

Brenna Visser/Cannon Beach Gazette

Sierra Shea glues on a piece of paper onto her collage at the Visual Arts Camp hosted by the Cannon Beach Arts Association.

Buy this photo
Students learned about decoupaging and collages at the Visual Arts Camp hosted by the Cannon Beach Arts Association.

Brenna Visser/Cannon Beach Gazette

Students learned about decoupaging and collages at the Visual Arts Camp hosted by the Cannon Beach Arts Association.

Buy this photo
George Ashely and Nick Lycette roll clay in their hands as they watch a stop motion demonstration at the Visual Arts Camp on Monday. The camp is hosted by the Cannon Beach Arts Association.

Brenna Visser/Cannon Beach Gazette

George Ashely and Nick Lycette roll clay in their hands as they watch a stop motion demonstration at the Visual Arts Camp on Monday. The camp is hosted by the Cannon Beach Arts Association.

Buy this photo
Adam Taylor instructs a class on how to make the ball of clay on the table appear it is moving with stop-motion editing software during the Visual Arts Camp on Monday.

Brenna Visser/Cannon Beach Gazette

Adam Taylor instructs a class on how to make the ball of clay on the table appear it is moving with stop-motion editing software during the Visual Arts Camp on Monday.

Buy this photo
Jasper Lycette shows Meagan Sokol,the  Arts Education Director at Cannon Beach Arts Association, a booklet he made during a book binding class during the Visual Arts Camp.

Brenna Visser/Cannon Beach Gazette

Jasper Lycette shows Meagan Sokol,the Arts Education Director at Cannon Beach Arts Association, a booklet he made during a book binding class during the Visual Arts Camp.

Buy this photo

Every nook and cranny of the Cannon Beach Community Church was filled with some form of art Monday afternoon.

By the sanctuary, students silently and mindfully painted designs with watercolors. In the nursery, children decoupaged mushrooms out of cardboard, colorful paper and shreds of old book pages. Down in the basement, teenagers rolled clay in their hands until their fingers were dyed a rainbow of colors in preparation to make stop motion videos with clay figurines.

These activities were the start to a week long visual arts camp hosted by the Cannon Beach Arts Association. In its 16th year, about 100 kids and adults from all across the North Coast signed up to take a variety of painting, crafting and movement classes.

“This is something I look forward to all year,” arts education director Meagan Sokol said. “Just seeing these kids blossom at the end of the week in incredible. I see how they are transformed by art.”

This year, several new classes were added, including a songwriting and portfolio workshop with local musician Evan Jiroudek, a collage clothing class, a mixed-media painting classes that uses recycled materials and a tutorial on how to create a stop-motion video.

But one of the most noticeable difference at this year’s camp was the age of some of the participants.

“Parents and guardians have been able to join their kids in classes before, but this is the first year we’ve had adult camp,” Sokol said. “Some parents just wanted a space all to themselves to do art. So now they can drop off their kids and head off to their own projects.”

At the end of the week, students will be able to share their creations at the camp’s first ever pop-up show at the gallery, “By the Sea, Art and Me.”

Sokol felt it was important to have a formal gallery showing. When she was a child at art camp, she said being able to show her work played a large role in leading her to a career in art therapy.

“It led me to do this with my life, and I wanted the kids to have that same experience,” she said.













Marketplace

Share and Discuss

Guidelines

User Comments