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Goonies fans had weekend of nostalgia in Astoria

Goonies weekend brought a deluge of 1980s nostalgia and crowds to Astoria.
By Edward Stratton

The Daily Astorian

Published on June 8, 2015 7:41AM

Last changed on June 8, 2015 11:16AM

Participants bare their bellies and do the Truffle Shuffe during the Farewell to Warren Field concert and film screening event Saturday.

JOSHUA BESSEX — The Daily Astorian

Participants bare their bellies and do the Truffle Shuffe during the Farewell to Warren Field concert and film screening event Saturday.

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Fans of “The Goonies” filled the grass and stands of John Warren Field for an outdoor screening of the film Saturday night.

JOSHUA BESSEX — The Daily Astorian

Fans of “The Goonies” filled the grass and stands of John Warren Field for an outdoor screening of the film Saturday night.

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Sierra Hart, dressed as Mama Fratelli, dances along to ‘80s music while her sister, Abbi Hart, right, watches. Jen Hart (not pictured) said she spent six months custom-making Goonies costumes for her and her kids.

JOSHUA BESSEX — The Daily Astorian

Sierra Hart, dressed as Mama Fratelli, dances along to ‘80s music while her sister, Abbi Hart, right, watches. Jen Hart (not pictured) said she spent six months custom-making Goonies costumes for her and her kids.

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Brian Kidd, also known as the Unipiper, unicycles around Exchange Street while shooting flames from his bagpipes Saturday. Kidd dressed as Sloth for “The Goonies” anniversary celebration.

JOSHUA BESSEX — The Daily Astorian

Brian Kidd, also known as the Unipiper, unicycles around Exchange Street while shooting flames from his bagpipes Saturday. Kidd dressed as Sloth for “The Goonies” anniversary celebration.

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Jeff Cohen, the actor who played Chunk, addresses the crowd during the Farewell to Warren Field event Saturday.

JOSHUA BESSEX — The Daily Astorian

Jeff Cohen, the actor who played Chunk, addresses the crowd during the Farewell to Warren Field event Saturday.

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Hannah Hart, 13, of Portland, looks out from her Sloth mask as she’s directed to be part of a group photo by an event photographer at the Farewell to Warren Field event Saturday.

JOSHUA BESSEX — The Daily Astorian

Hannah Hart, 13, of Portland, looks out from her Sloth mask as she’s directed to be part of a group photo by an event photographer at the Farewell to Warren Field event Saturday.

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Devonte Hart, 12, of Portland, smiles as he holds Jen Hart’s, right, replica Data boom box during the Farewell to Warren Field event Saturday. Jen Hart said she spent six months custom-making the costumes for her and her kids.

JOSHUA BESSEX — The Daily Astorian

Devonte Hart, 12, of Portland, smiles as he holds Jen Hart’s, right, replica Data boom box during the Farewell to Warren Field event Saturday. Jen Hart said she spent six months custom-making the costumes for her and her kids.

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A 1980s convention filled the main floor of the Astoria Armory for “The Goonies” 30th anniversary.

EDWARD STRATTON — The Daily Astorian

A 1980s convention filled the main floor of the Astoria Armory for “The Goonies” 30th anniversary.

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Brian Kidd, known as the Unipiper in Portland for unicycling and playing the bagpipes in a kilt and Darth Vader helmet, dressed up as Sloth and paraded around Astoria for “The Goonies” 30th Anniversary.

EDWARD STRATTON — The Daily Astorian

Brian Kidd, known as the Unipiper in Portland for unicycling and playing the bagpipes in a kilt and Darth Vader helmet, dressed up as Sloth and paraded around Astoria for “The Goonies” 30th Anniversary.

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The 1980s block party outside the Astoria Event Center included a DeLorean display.

EDWARD STRATTON — The Daily Astorian

The 1980s block party outside the Astoria Event Center included a DeLorean display.

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A well-libated Goonies reveler snapped a selfie with LJ Gunderson and the locally iconic clown car owned by Jeff Daly, son of original Astoria Clown Jack Daly. The car was originally purchased from a mortuary in the 1950s and retrofitted by the clowns, a civic booster group that used the vehicle in parades to highlight the need for a bridge over the Columbia River at Astoria.

EDWARD STRATTON — The Daily Astorian

A well-libated Goonies reveler snapped a selfie with LJ Gunderson and the locally iconic clown car owned by Jeff Daly, son of original Astoria Clown Jack Daly. The car was originally purchased from a mortuary in the 1950s and retrofitted by the clowns, a civic booster group that used the vehicle in parades to highlight the need for a bridge over the Columbia River at Astoria.

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The duo known as Booby Traps, dedicated to Cyndi Lauper, asked if there were any girls who wanted to have fun Saturday at the Farewell to Warren Field event. And Goonies revelers responded in force during the duo’s cover of the iconic Lauper pop hit.

EDWARD STRATTON — The Daily Astorian

The duo known as Booby Traps, dedicated to Cyndi Lauper, asked if there were any girls who wanted to have fun Saturday at the Farewell to Warren Field event. And Goonies revelers responded in force during the duo’s cover of the iconic Lauper pop hit.

Buy this photo

The crowds packing John Warren Field Saturday night roared their approval once the familiar skull and crossbones appeared on the 40-foot-tall inflatable movie screen, signaling the start of “The Goonies.”

A wave of cheers greeted the first glimpse of each key character, like basketball players being welcomed onto their home floor.

The 1985 cult classic, which turned 30 over the weekend, brought an overdose of 1980s nostalgia and Goonies fandom to Astoria.

Regina Willkie, marketing director for the Astoria-Warrenton Area Chamber of Commerce, estimated that around 12,000 people came for the 30th anniversary, compared with the 15,000 she estimated for the 25th.

“It’s no different than crab fest, Regatta or Hood to Coast, as far as people in town,” she said.

The celebration crescendoed Saturday night during the Farewell to Warren Field concert and film screening. The former Astoria High School football stadium, a setting for one of the scenes in the movie, is now owned by Columbia Memorial Hospital and will eventually be torn down.

The goodbye party featured a Truffle Shuffle hundreds strong, Americana band The Whiskey Rebellion and the Cyndi Lauper-dedicated duo Booby Traps, who at the end of their set asked if there were any girls in the audience who wanted to have fun. A gaggle of girls and women rushed the stage, where they all danced to the iconic Lauper pop hit.

Willkie said people were impressed with the new events compared to five years ago, including the trade convention in the Astoria Armory. The event brought in mostly 1980s and cinematic memorabilia, with art, movies, toys, accessories, 1980s-themed pastries and a Lego diorama depicting the Goon Docks and One-Eyed Willy’s treasure cave and pirate ship.

“Some of the vendors would love to have a trade show like this every year,” Willkie said.

She said the chamber’s main goal in the event is to break even, although she would not share how much the event cost to put on or how much the chamber made in return.

The celebration was scattered around the North Coast, from a beach bonfire and 5K race in Cannon Beach to the film screening at Warren Field and a block party and 1980s-themed dance party at the Astoria Event Center, complete with a display of DeLoreans on Ninth Street.

Another new event for the 30th anniversary was the 20-stage geocache — the One-Eyed Willy Treasure Hunt — organized by Seattle company Geocaching. Tom Phillips, a vice president of marketing for Geocaching, said 812 groups took part, with three-quarters making it to all the filming locations and businesses. The fastest group finished the geocache in about 90 minutes.

“The (public relations) value we had this year is great for the region year-round,” Willkie said, adding most of the hotels she called this weekend were full, along with Fort Stevens State Park’s campgrounds and most of KOA.

The weekend brought out the Goonies cult following from around the world.

Possibly the most peculiar visitor was Brian Kidd, better known in Portland as the Unipiper, a unicycling, kilt- and Darth Vader helmet-wearing bagpiper.

In Astoria, Kidd donned his Sloth mask and costume and rolled around downtown playing his fire-breathing bagpipes and snapping photos with visitors.

“It’s like my favorite movie growing up,” Kidd said of “The Goonies,” adding he moved from Virginia to Oregon years back in part because of the nostalgia from the movie. “That’s one of the first things I did after moving to Portland, is drove to Astoria,” he said.























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