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Flavel descendant tours historic family home

Mark Bridgeman said he had never seen the family tree before and learned most of his family history from his grandmother, Virginia Southworth Flavel.

By McKINLEY SMITH

The Daily Astorian

Published on July 15, 2015 8:52AM

Last changed on July 15, 2015 9:43AM

Mark and Ellen Bridgeman pose outside the Flavel House Tuesday morning with Mac Burns, center, the museum’s executive director. Mark Bridgeman is the great-great-great-great grandson of George and Mary Flavel.

Clatsop County Historical Society/Submitted Photo

Mark and Ellen Bridgeman pose outside the Flavel House Tuesday morning with Mac Burns, center, the museum’s executive director. Mark Bridgeman is the great-great-great-great grandson of George and Mary Flavel.

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George and Mary Flavel’s great-great-great-great grandson, Mark Bridgeman, and his wife, Ellen, visited the Flavel House Tuesday morning to celebrate their anniversary.

It was their first time touring the historic grounds where the legendary sea captain and bar pilot lived.

Mark Bridgeman said he had never seen the family tree before and learned most of his family history from his grandmother, Virginia Southworth Flavel.

“It may be embellished a little,” he said of his grandmother’s accounts as he stood in the former Carriage House.

The Bridgeman’s own an auto repair shop in Sonoma, Calif., where they work on European cars.

Patricia Jean Flavel, Mark Bridgeman’s great-aunt, donated the property to the city and later to the county in 1936 when the city could not afford it, according to the Clatsop County Historical Society’s website.

The property includes the Flavel House, which was built in 1886 for Capt. George Flavel and his family, as well as the gardens and the Carriage House. Patricia Jean Flavel died in 2014.

Mac Burns, the executive director of the Clatsop County Historical Society, showed Flavel’s descendants a family tree while they waited to begin their tour. He was excited to have a Flavel family member at the property.

“If you’re somewhere on this tree, it’s your house,” he said, noting he has come out at all hours of the day to show the house to Flavel’s relatives.

The Bridgemans, who were celebrating their 15th anniversary Tuesday, visited just after 9 a.m., before the museum’s normal opening time of 9:30 a.m.

“This is the whole purpose of our trip — to see the family Flavel home,” Ellen Bridgeman said.



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