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Seaside tsunami survey measures awareness, preparedness

Knowledge of evacuation routes
By R.J. Marx

The Daily Astorian

Published on October 19, 2017 8:33AM

Dan Cox of Oregon State University at the Seaside Library in September. He is one of the authors of the survey distributed to a random selection of residents.

R.J. Marx/The Daily Astorian

Dan Cox of Oregon State University at the Seaside Library in September. He is one of the authors of the survey distributed to a random selection of residents.

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Social science researcher Lori Cramer seeks information about local tsunami preparedness.

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Social science researcher Lori Cramer seeks information about local tsunami preparedness.


SEASIDE — A new survey takes aim at how Seaside residents perceive the threat of an earthquake and tsunami.

Surveys are heading to more than 300 randomly selected houses.

“I think there is a lot of good information out there, but how people are taking that in and if they are doing anything with it is an unknown,” survey author Lori Cramer, a social scientist at Oregon State University, said.

The survey is funded by the National Science Foundation.

Cramer, along with Oregon State University engineering colleagues Dan Cox and Haizhong Wang, want to study perspectives to determine where gaps are right now, and are looking for people’s understanding of the evacuation routes in particular.

“Although a lot of information is available, relatively little is known about how individuals and families are perceiving this information,” Cramer said. “By directly asking people their opinions, this project aims to develop a better understanding of perceptions and preparedness toward a Cascadia event.”

The anonymous questionnaire takes about 15 to 25 minutes to complete, Cramer said.

The ultimate goal of the study is to enhance community preparedness. The results will give state and local officials an accurate idea of the prevailing level of risk and readiness in the community, and help officials devise the best methods of addressing preparedness.

Researchers will work with Patrick Corcoran, Oregon Sea Grant Extension coastal hazard specialist, to develop public forums for sharing results with Seaside residents.



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