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Victims’ advocacy group relocates in downtown Astoria

Thrift store will remain in Norblad for now
By Edward Stratton

The Daily Astorian

Published on November 17, 2017 7:51AM

The Harbor recently moved its offices into the former Snow & Snow law firm at 801 Commercial St.

Edward Stratton/The Daily Astorian

The Harbor recently moved its offices into the former Snow & Snow law firm at 801 Commercial St.

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Astoria Makers has been fixing up the Van Dusen Building, purchased from The Harbor earlier this year.

Edward Stratton/The Daily Astorian

Astoria Makers has been fixing up the Van Dusen Building, purchased from The Harbor earlier this year.

Buy this photo

The Harbor, the region’s advocacy group for victims of sexual and domestic violence, has moved its offices to the former Snow & Snow law firm at the corner of Eighth and Commercial streets.

Deja Vu, a thrift store supporting The Harbor, is still in the Norblad Building at the corner of 14th and Duane streets while the group finds a new location.

Sue Farmer, the interim executive director of The Harbor, said the new office space is about the same size as the previous offices in the Norblad Building but provides a more concentrated and up-to-date setting.

“These offices provide for more confidentiality,” Farmer said, adding The Harbor will only be in the lower level of the office space previously occupied by the law firm.

The Harbor recently sold the Van Dusen Building at the corner of Duane and 10th streets to Astoria Maker Industries, a makerspace that will establish its headquarters in the building. The Harbor had previously been located in the building, a donation from Pig ’N Pancake founders Marianne and Robert Poole, until moving in 2010 to the Norblad Building to save money.

The Harbor’s restoration of the Van Dusen Building, largely driven by volunteers, became too expensive. Farmer said selling the building has “given us a reserve we can fall back on when we’re waiting for grant reimbursements.”

Jeanyse Snow, a partner with her husband, Hal, in the Snow & Snow law firm until his death last year, recently sold the building at the corner of Eighth and Commercial streets to Dash Family LLC, registered to local attorney Blair Henningsgaard.

Farmer took over as interim executive director of The Harbor when Melissa Van Horn left in September 2016.

“We’re always open to the possibility of somebody,” she said when asked about whether the group was searching for a new director. “I did not want to step down until we found someone who was suitable for the position.”

Farmer said The Harbor is now on better financial footing, with reserves from the building sale and grants from Providence Seaside Hospital, Randall Family Foundation and Warrenton High School’s CommuniCare program.

Paul Caruana, who owns the Norblad Building with business partner Brand Faherty, said The Harbor has occupied three spaces, each 1,200 to 1,400 square feet. There are no plans for what might go in once the group is moved out, he said.



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