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Volunteers help fight off plant invaders near Circle Creek

The invasive species known as policeman’s helmet is a pest

The Daily Astorian

Published on June 14, 2018 12:01AM

Jeff Roehm removes an invasive plant species known as policeman’s helmet from an area near the Circle Creek Conservation Center.

Colin Murphey/The Daily Astorian

Jeff Roehm removes an invasive plant species known as policeman’s helmet from an area near the Circle Creek Conservation Center.

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Policeman’s helmet is considered a threat to native plant species in the region.

Colin Murphey/The Daily Astorian

Policeman’s helmet is considered a threat to native plant species in the region.

Buy this photo
Volunteers make their way through thick brush to remove an invasive plant species near the Circle Creek Conservation Center south of Seaside.

Colin Murphey/The Daily Astorian

Volunteers make their way through thick brush to remove an invasive plant species near the Circle Creek Conservation Center south of Seaside.

Buy this photo

Volunteers gathered Wednesday morning to help pull the invasive weed species known as policeman’s helmet from the banks of Circle Creek south of Seaside.

The North Coast Land Conservancy organizes these events in an effort to eradicate the weed, which chokes out native plant species and spreads seeds through moving water. The resilient weed was first found in the Necanicum River watershed in Clatsop County around six years ago.

The land conservancy is on the second year of their eradication efforts. Two years ago, the organization received an $86,000 grant from the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board to fight the spread of the plant.





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