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In Seaview, the sign points to teamwork

Templin Foundation jump starts fundraising effort

By PATRICK WEBB

Chinook Observer

Published on October 10, 2018 9:46AM

Patrick Webb/Chinook Observer
John Ramage, project manager, left, and Brett Malin, longtime Seaview resident, are all smiles as they check over the installation of the Seaview sign.

Patrick Webb/Chinook Observer John Ramage, project manager, left, and Brett Malin, longtime Seaview resident, are all smiles as they check over the installation of the Seaview sign.

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Selling handmade birdhouses is a fundraising tool for the Seaview beach approach sign.

Selling handmade birdhouses is a fundraising tool for the Seaview beach approach sign.


SEAVIEW, Wash. — It’s up!

The Seaview sign is back in its rightful place, two years after a car accident damaged it so badly it had to be removed.

And Nansen Malin, who led the campaign to get it replaced, is happy.

But she’s not taking much of the credit — there is a list of people to thank, proving community projects are a team effort.

The old sign had been in place at 38th Place for 16 years. When it was hit by a vehicle two years ago, Pacific County crews had to remove it because the damaged, termite-ridden structure was a hazard. That version was one of many incarnations greeting visitors to the Seaview beach approach in the past 145 years.

As designs were considered for a new sign, the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum showed project supporters photos of earlier versions, some of which were constructed from whale bones or driftwood.

Malin and members of the Seaview Historical Preservation Society decided replacing it was a priority. Getting that accomplished took two years because of the need to raise funds and create a new design that met changed government requirements.

For her project manager, Malin recruited John Ramage, a civil engineer who had retired to Seaview. He embraced the concept, led the planning and provided the technical expertise to make it happen, Malin said.

Together they brought architect David Jensen on board. Jensen, whose grandparents lived close to the sign decades ago, worked through design concepts, engineering requirements and safety regulations. “He helped us refine the design to fit ‘Historic Seaview,’” Malin said.

A $18,000 grant from the Templin Foundation paid for the bulk of the project. Russell and Allys Templin moved to Long Beach in 1951 from Wisconsin. They owned a sawmill, rock quarry and a logging operation; Russ Templin served on the board of Bank of the Pacific and was active with the Long Beach Elks Lodge.

Local fundraising added to this amount. Malin said her group is just $2,000 short of covering the $32,500 total.



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