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Gearhart short-term rental timeline

From 1994 to 2017, how Gearhart came to a decision

Published on November 8, 2017 11:17AM

Last changed on November 10, 2017 7:45AM

Colin Murphey/EO Media Group
Election signs went missing in Gearhart last weekend.

Colin Murphey/EO Media Group Election signs went missing in Gearhart last weekend.

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Colin Murphey/EO Media Group
Gearhart Mayor Matt Brown reads election results to a room full of people at a watch party at McMenamins Gearhart Hotel Tuesday night.

Colin Murphey/EO Media Group Gearhart Mayor Matt Brown reads election results to a room full of people at a watch party at McMenamins Gearhart Hotel Tuesday night.

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1994 — Gearhart comprehensive plan adopted with goal to preserve the city’s low density, semi-rural character. The plan states, “The city will recognize the importance of the city’s neighborhoods and the need to protect them from negative impacts of the transient rental property and to discourage increased levels of traffic and similar disruptions,” the plan states.

September 2013 — Members of the Gearhart Planning Commission and City Council consider changes in the way short-term rental properties are taxed and regulated.

August 2015 — Residents fill the Gearhart Fire Hall at the city’s first short-term rental workshop.

November 2015 — City Council holds continuation of rental workshop. Nine Gearhart property owners cite what they say are “inaccuracies, double-counted data and speculation” in the city’s data.

December 2015 — City Council members agree to develop short-term rental regulations, rejecting a plea from some residents to conduct a citywide rental survey before a vote.

May 2016 — Planning Commission recommends limiting short-term rental permits to property owners who have paid 2015 lodging taxes.

September 2016 — After what the city planner called “30 meetings and eight draft reports,” the City Council passes Ordinance 901 unanimously without discussion.

October 2016 —Short-term rental owners file an appeal with the state to reject city rules.

November 2016 — Mayoral candidates Bob Shortman and Matt Brown clash on approach to short-term rental rules. Brown, who supports the city’s ordinance, wins election.

April 2017 — David Townsend, Joy Sigler, Brian Sigler and Sarah Nebeker file a challenge seeking a ballot initiative that would repeal and replace Ordinance 901.

May 2017 — Oregon Land Use Board of Appeals upholds provisions of Ordinance 901.

July 2017 — The bid to repeal and replace the regulations issued last fall gathered enough valid signatures to put the measure on the ballot.

November 2017 — Voters reject Measure 4-188, with 77 percent opposed to repeal and replace of the rules to 23 percent in favor.



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