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Will city purchase high school’s ‘north 40’?

System fees could pay for land transaction
By R.J. Marx

The Daily Astorian

Published on November 27, 2018 2:24PM

Last changed on November 30, 2018 1:53PM

Seaside High School fields could be part of future negotiations between the school district and city.

R.J. Marx

Seaside High School fields could be part of future negotiations between the school district and city.

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The Seaside Visitor’s Bureau sits on land owned by the Seaside School District, and could be sold off.

R.J. Marx

The Seaside Visitor’s Bureau sits on land owned by the Seaside School District, and could be sold off.

Buy this photo

A $6 million water storage tank is only one component of the Seaside School District’s ongoing negotiations with the city of Seaside.

With upgrades expected at Avenue S and on Spruce Drive, the school district will be looking for the city to step up and either fully fund or partially fund road projects near the campus.

City Manager Mark Winstanley laid out options to city councilors at a November work session.

Spruce Drive was not constructed to handle the level of traffic that will be going to the new school, he said, including some of the turns at the intersection of South Wahanna Road, which will be reconfigured.

While Winstanley said he did not expect the school district to pay for road repairs and upgrades on Spruce, he “would be concerned that the school pay for damages occurring on Spruce during construction.”

To the south, Avenue S was scheduled for an upgrade prior to the campus project.

“Avenue S isn’t able in any way shape or form to support this kind of traffic,” Winstanley said. “It’s not just the school district. That area in Seaside has continued to grow. Avenue S has gone from being a country road that I wouldn’t have driven my car as a teenager to an arterial road in the city of Seaside. We are already working on a design for what that road will actually look like.”


A barter deal?


The school district’s system development fees — payable to the city — are estimated at over $900,000, including building permits and fees. Seaside received nearly $500,000 in plan review fees, and will receive $56,000 for water system, $52,000 in sewer system and $205,000 in parks fees. The school district may have some options other than to pay those costs off in cash. Already the city has announced its intention to barter a new water treatment plant for 3 acres of land at the new campus site.

At Broadway and Holladay, the Seaside’s Visitor’s Bureau sits on school district property. The city would like to add that to their portfolio.

And land known as “the north 40” — the fields north of the current Seaside High School — could be offered to the city by the school district for use as parkland.

A developer can offer to donate property in lieu of paying system development fees, Winstanley said.

“We’re looking at the possibility of acquiring property the school district currently has, because we think there are properties that are advantageous,” Winstanley said. “In this case, the property the chamber building or the Visitors Bureau sits on now is owned by the school district.

“It’s possible we will come back to ask you if some or all of this can be mitigated to acquire property in lieu of the school district paying money,” he told city councilors. “If we don’t acquire it now, the school district may decide to develop it.”



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