Search sponsored by Coast Marketplace
Home Signal Signal Opinion

How does your baby grow?

Pregnant women get perks to sign up for nutrition study

By Susan Cody

For EO Media Group

Published on November 3, 2017 11:09AM

Last changed on November 3, 2017 11:24AM

Wendy D’Agostino, CAMPS nutrition study coordinator, poses at the North Coast Food Web.

Sue Cody/For EO Media Group

Wendy D’Agostino, CAMPS nutrition study coordinator, poses at the North Coast Food Web.


How does your baby grow? Can nutritional advice, food choices and cooking classes improve the growth and health of your baby? Researchers hope to answer these questions and more in the Clatsop-Astoria Maternal Partnership Study.

“We are seeking 100 women in the first trimester of pregnancy to participate in the study,” says Wendy D’Agostino, the study coordinator. All participants will receive nutritional information and half will receive a 12-week cooking classes at the North Coast Food Web.

“We want to see if cooking classes improve overall health and wellness.”

In addition to the free cooking classes, an incentive of up to $85 is offered for monitoring, which will be performed by D’Agostino, who is a registered nurse.

Women in the study must also be at least 18 years old, planning to deliver their baby at Columbia Memorial Hospital (CMH) and speak fluent English. To learn more or to sign up, contact D’Agostino at 607-369-4907. Information is also available at the Women’s Center at CMH.

The study

“We are now in the fourth generation of people not cooking,” says D’Agostino. She said this sets the stage for ill health and a shorter life.

“The 2016 census predicted longevity for Americans will decrease for the first time in 100 years,” D’Agostino said. “A low-nutrient, high-calorie diet leads to obesity and malnourishment, type 2 diabetes and heart disease. We want to see if cooking classes improve overall health and wellness” of pregnant women and their babies.

Clatsop County is one site in a series of studies by Oregon Health Science University’s Knight Cardiovascular Institute to answer questions about fetal development, disease prevention and nutrition. These studies focus on how certain factors in the prenatal environment can make people more susceptible to heart disease and obesity.

Dr. Jonathan Purnell is conducting CAMPS, working with pregnant women, Columbia Memorial Hospital and the North Coast Food Web. Study Coordinator D’Agostino, who also serves as the kitchen manager at the Food Web, will screen applicants and monitor them over the course of their pregnancy and up to six months after they deliver their baby.

To read more about the study, see The Way to Wellvile website: http://bit.ly/W2Wcamps.



Marketplace

Share and Discuss

Guidelines

User Comments