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College tuition break pitched for immigrants

The state Senate on Monday passed a bill to give resident tuition to noncitizens who have graduated from Oregon high schools

By PARIS ACHEN

Capital Bureau

Published on February 19, 2018 7:12PM

Last changed on February 20, 2018 8:31AM

U.S. Rep. Earl Blumenauer, D-Oregon, and DACA recipient Aldo Solano of Portland at Blumenauer’s office in Northeast Portland in January.

Jaime Valdez/Portland Tribune

U.S. Rep. Earl Blumenauer, D-Oregon, and DACA recipient Aldo Solano of Portland at Blumenauer’s office in Northeast Portland in January.


SALEM — Pushing back on federal policies on immigration, the state Senate on Monday passed a bill that would give in-state college tuition to students who have graduated from an Oregon high school but are not citizens.

The bill was designed to address the Trump Administration’s plan to eliminate the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

However, the bill also offers in-state tuition to immigrant students who never received DACA.

“These children are our children,” state Senate President Peter Courtney, D-Salem, said in an emotional speech on the Senate floor Monday. He said children who were brought to the United States by their parents had no choice in the matter and should not be penalized for the rest of their lives.

The Senate passed the bill 17-10, with support from 16 Democrats and one Republican, Sen. Alan DeBoer of Ashland. Ten other Senate Republicans voted against the bill.

Under a law passed in 2013, immigrant students have to apply for an official federal identification document to be eligible for resident tuition at Oregon’s public universities. The removal of DACA makes those documents impossible to obtain. The bill essentially removes the requirement to submit an official federal identification document to receive in-state tuition. Instead, students only have to show that they graduated from an Oregon high school. That mirrors eligibility requirements for citizens in Oregon.

The bill also makes immigrant students eligible for scholarships, grants and other financial aid from public universities, community colleges and the Oregon Higher Education Coordinating Commission.

Sen. Fred Girod, R-Stayton, said he opposed the legislation because it reneged on a bipartisan agreement when the 2013 law was passed to make immigrant students eligible to receive in-state tuition but not state financial aid.

If passed by the House and signed by Gov. Kate Brown, the law would take effect immediately.

More than 11,000 Oregonians are DACA recipients.



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