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In One Ear: Local brevities

Newsy notes drom 1889 and 1890
By Elleda Wilson

The Daily Astorian

Published on March 2, 2018 12:01AM


Snippets from The Daily Morning Astorian, Saturday, March 2, 1889:

• The widow of Ben Holladay has entered suit for $100,366 (about $2.5 million now) against Joe Holladay.

Note: Ben Holladay was a transportation magnate who built the Seaside House Hotel in 1871 (https://tinyurl.com/bholla). When he died in 1887, he was deep in debt, and was being sued by his brother, Joseph, for $315,000 (https://tinyurl.com/bholla1). The convoluted family lawsuits went on for years.

• … The tobacco bill passed at the recent session of the legislature … (is) an act to prohibit the sale of tobacco, cigars or cigarettes to minors under the age of 18 years.

Note: On Aug. 9, 2017, Gov. Kate Brown signed a bill raising the age from 18 to 21, effective Jan. 1 this year (https://tinyurl.com/nopuff21).

And, on Sunday, March 2, 1890:

• The time when Astoria will have incandescent electric lights must soon come. They are as necessary as the large arc lights, and are better suited to offices than those now in use.

Note: Once Thomas Edison and his team discovered that a carbonized bamboo filament in an incandescent bulb could last over 1,200 hours, the Edison Electric Light Company began marketing them in 1880 (https://tinyurl.com/bulb1880).

• Swan Island bar is the present bugbear to captains of craft drawing more than 15 feet that essay to go very far in the interior.

Note: Even though dredging around Swan Island was done annually in the late 1800s, it wasn’t enough. It wasn’t until 1927 that a 35 by 1,155-foot channel was dredged on the south side of the island, which became an airport. That same year Charles Lindbergh landed there. (https://tinyurl.com/SwanIs)

• At low tide says the Journal, the clam diggers are busy on the flats in front of Ilwaco, where the clams are numerous and fat. A few years ago no such thing as a clam was to be found in Bakers Bay, while now the supply seems to be inexhaustible.



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