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Endorsement: Hillary Clinton should be our next president

Published on October 14, 2016 2:35AM

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a rally at Wayne State University in Detroit on Monday.

AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a rally at Wayne State University in Detroit on Monday.


On Election Day, Hillary Clinton should make history by becoming the nation’s first woman president, and she has our endorsement for the job.

Republican billionaire Donald Trump is simply unsuited to be president of the United States. He is an arrogant bully, a loose cannon who lacks the judgment, integrity, temperament and honesty that our country needs at the helm of the largest democracy in the world.

Two other candidates, Libertarian Gary Johnson and the Green Party’s Jill Stein, are also on the ballot. While Johnson has the most support between those two and has a solid grip on domestic affairs, he doesn’t have the full command of global issues the presidency requires.

Hillary Clinton, by contrast, is fully capable of leading our country. By becoming president she would break barriers that shouldn’t exist. She has prior top-level experience as secretary of state and as first lady of the country while her husband, Bill, was president. She has the professionalism, temperament and sophistication to lead this country, as evidenced by her steady composure during the debates with Trump where he imploded in front of a worldwide audience.

She supports overall immigration reform and wants to improve the Affordable Care Act rather than shelve it. She also supports equality and has worked all of her career to improve the lives of children, women and families. She wants a raise in the federal minimum wage to $12 an hour, and she says a priority will be to find financial help for students so they don’t leave college with enormous debt.

Those are all values we support, but our endorsement also comes with several reservations.

Clinton’s programs come with a steep price. They would greatly increase federal spending and taxation at a time when the national debt is continuing to soar.

Polls also show there are deep questions of trust as a result of her misinformation during the aftermath of the terrorist attack on Americans in Libya along with the scandal of mishandling emails on a private personal email server that were sensitive to national security. Her acknowledgment that she made mistakes, though, shows she has learned from them and moved forward.

As president, we hope Clinton is far more transparent and takes a more moderate approach to spending, two elements that have divided America for nearly a quarter of a century since her husband was in office. Her choice of her running mate, U.S. Sen. Tim Kaine of Virginia, is also a good one. He is steady and known for his leadership and consensus building, which both he and Clinton will need when working with a stagnated Congress and unresponsive federal agencies.

On foreign policy, Clinton is a tenacious, skilled diplomat and she has argued for America’s position with a host of unfriendly world leaders. Her toughness and coolness under pressure will be needed when our country is tested by the likes of North Korea, Iran and Russia.

And domestically, Clinton is pragmatic and has a record of bipartisanship. She has a great opportunity to help the country heal. While Trump is an unelectable candidate because of his deep personal flaws, his candidacy tapped into the fierce discontent with governmental gridlock and of disenfranchised people feeling left behind by the recession that changed our economy and lifestyles. That discontent is filled with governmental mistrust, and that needs to be fixed from the top down. Clinton needs to make that a top priority, and she will need to prod Congress to action so Americans can realize a new era of prosperity.

For that prosperity to have a chance to occur, voters need to put Hillary Clinton in the Oval Office.



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