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Our View: Shoutouts and Callouts

Praise for those who deserve it

Published on August 4, 2017 12:01AM

Hundreds of corgis and their owners gathered last weekend in Cannon Beach for the fifth annual Oregon Corgi Beach Day. The event started with just a few dozen corgis and their owners and has ballooned in size in recent years.

Rebecca Sprengeler

Hundreds of corgis and their owners gathered last weekend in Cannon Beach for the fifth annual Oregon Corgi Beach Day. The event started with just a few dozen corgis and their owners and has ballooned in size in recent years.


Each week we recognize those people and organizations in the community deserving of public praise for the good things they do to make the North Coast a better place to live, and also those who should be called out for their actions.


Shoutouts


This week’s Shoutouts go to:

• Winners, participants and organizers of the recent 107th Oregon Coast Invitational golf tournament at the Astoria Golf & Country Club, which is one of oldest tournaments on the West Coast. Riley Elmes successfully defended his Grand Champions trophy, winning for the second consecutive year, while Lara Tennant took top honors in the Women’s Division. Elmes son, Matt, won the Junior Seniors Division. In the Seniors Division, Bret Stevens posted the victory, while Larry Wobbrock topped the leaderboard in the Super Seniors Division.

John Underwood, a Bainbridge Island, Washington, resident and also a homeowner in Cannon Beach, who donated $10,000 to help launch the “Protect our Puffins” program this summer. The effort, with the help of the Haystack Rock Awareness Program, will include the sale of sweatshirts that say “Protect our Puffins” at local businesses. The proceeds will fund informational brochures, research and an event next summer to raise awareness for the puffin bird population which has been in sharp decline in recent years, including the colony at Haystack Rock. Researchers haven’t pinpointed the reason for the decline, but are working to determine its cause.

Christian Montbrand, a student in AmeriCorps’ Resource Assistance for Rural Environment program, who spent a year in Seaside helping the city develop tsunami education outreach and also updating its parks master plan. Montbrand, who will seek a graduate degree at the University of Oregon in the fall, was supervised by Public Works Director Dale McDowell and led a recent open house on the parks master plan at the Seaside Library, sharing a vision for the city’s parks and garnering feedback from about 40 attendees. McDowell said the findings will be included in recommendations for updates to the existing parks plan.

Jennifer Robinson, who organized the fifth annual Corgi Beach Day in Cannon Beach last Saturday, which raised more than $9,000 for the Oregon Humane Society. The event, which has grown in participation and attendance each year, attracted hundreds of the short-legged, smiley dogs with their owners and friends, and the proceeds are used to help the Humane Society finance day-to-day costs along with programs to alleviate overcrowding in shelters and investigate animal cruelty and neglect cases.


Callouts


This week’s Callouts go to:

Internal Revenue Service scammers who have been targeting residents throughout the North Coast during the past month with waves of “robocalls” from people who claim to be IRS or U.S. Treasury agents. The callers, or sometimes automated recordings, tell the target that their tax records are wrong, or that they owe back taxes or penalties with the goal of getting a worried recipient to provide bank account information or money. The IRS annually lists the fake agent scam as one of the largest it has to combat. According to the IRS, scammers have duped more than 10,000 victims out of $54 million since 2013. Real federal agents rarely call without sending mail first, and do not call demanding payment or ask for wire transfers or credit card numbers. IRS Commissioner John Koskinen says anyone receiving such a call should “just hang up and don’t engage these people.” The IRS also advises residents to report suspicious tax callers on the “IRS Impersonation Scam Reporting” webpage, or by calling 800-366-4484.


Suggestions?


Do you have a Shoutout or Callout you think we should know about? Let us know at news@dailyastorian.com and we’ll make sure to take a look.



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