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Our View: Shoutouts and Callouts

Praise for those who deserve it

Published on August 17, 2017 4:43PM

Last changed on August 18, 2017 9:23AM

Cmdr. Patrick Culver, left, transfered command of the U.S. Coast Guard cutter Alert to Cmdr. Tobias Reid, right, Friday. The ceremony was overseen by Rear Adm. Pat DeQuattro, deputy commander of the Coast Guard Pacific Area that oversees the agency’s operations in the Pacific and Indian oceans.

Edward Stratton/The Daily Astorian

Cmdr. Patrick Culver, left, transfered command of the U.S. Coast Guard cutter Alert to Cmdr. Tobias Reid, right, Friday. The ceremony was overseen by Rear Adm. Pat DeQuattro, deputy commander of the Coast Guard Pacific Area that oversees the agency’s operations in the Pacific and Indian oceans.

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Each week we recognize those people and organizations in the community deserving of public praise for the good things they do to make the North Coast a better place to live, and also those who should be called out for their actions.


Shoutouts


This week’s Shoutouts go to:

U.S. Coast Guard Cmdr. Patrick Culver, who transferred command of the cutter Alert last Friday to Cmdr. Tobias Reid after two years at the helm. Culver now heads to Washington, D.C., where he will be chief of drug and migrant interdiction. Reid comes to the region from North Charleston, South Carolina, where he was the executive officer aboard the cutter Hamilton for the past two years. The transfer of command ceremony was overseen by Rear Adm. Pat DeQuattro, deputy commander of the Coast Guard Pacific Area, who called Culver a consummate professional who leads from the front.

• The Seaside Chamber of Commerce, organizers and volunteers who put together and staffed last weekend’s 36th annual Seaside Beach Volleyball Tournament, which drew more than 3,000 players on about 1,450 teams to compete on the beach for championships in a host of different divisions. Huge crowds of family members, friends and other spectators cheered them on, and according to organizers, the four-day event has been recognized since 2011 by the World Records Academy as the country’s largest amateur beach volleyball tournament. Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Brian Owen said over the years the tournament has grown from five courts on the sand to 154 now. “There’s nothing like it,” Owen said. “For a small town having one of the world’s largest beach volleyball tournaments, it’s a blessing.”

U.S. Bank and Mo’s Seafood and Chowder, which each made recent donations to charitable causes on the North Coast. U.S. Bank gave a $3,500 grant to the Way to Wellville’s Clatsop Kids Go program, which is an in-school program designed to help children develop healthy behaviors and positive attitudes around physical activity, nutrition and well-being. Mo’s Seafood and Chowder donated $3,930 — all of its proceeds from its recent grand opening in Astoria — to the Assistance League of the Columbia Pacific, which will use the money to help schoolchildren in need through the organization’s philanthropic programs.

Portland Timbers soccer players Roy Miller, Darlington Nagbe and Lawrence Olum, who earlier this week visited with patients at Providence Seaside Hospital and then children at Warrenton Grade School as part of the team’s community outreach program. The three players were also joined by the team’s mascot, “Timber Joey,” as well as Seaside High School graduate and Timbers staffer Kai Davidson. After the school visit, they also conducted a free soccer clinic followed by a question-and-answer session at the Warrenton Soccer Complex.

• The congregation of North Coast Family Fellowship in Seaside, which has greatly increased monthly food donations to the South Clatsop County Food Bank. The Seaside church’s pastor, John Neagle, challenged the congregation to try and contribute more for the food bank than it has in the past, and the congregation responded by increasing its monthly donations from 500 to 800 pounds of food previously to 800 to 1,400 pounds each month now. The food bank’s regional manager, Karla Gann, said the increased volume has had a significant impact in helping those who need it and amounts to about one-tenth of all donations that the food bank receives.


Callouts


This week’s Callouts go to:

• The Columbia-Snake River Irrigators Association, which asked the Trump administration to sidestep endangered species laws by convening a panel that could exempt up to 13 imperiled salmon and steelhead species from the act. The association, which represents farmers in Oregon and Washington state, asserts that the costs of saving the federally protected endangered salmon species and increasing the runs along the river system are unsustainable. The Cabinet-level committee that would convene is called the “God squad” because its decisions can lead to extinctions of threatened wildlife. Critics are calling the association’s request a publicity stunt and said it could hurt fishing companies and others that depend on healthy salmon runs. Fish counts this year along the Columbia and Snake rivers have been well-below the 10-year average.


Suggestions?


Do you have a Shoutout or Callout you think we should know about? Let us know at news@dailyastorian.com and we’ll make sure to take a look.



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