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Water Under the Bridge: Astoria coffee situation ‘critical’ in 1943

From the pages of Astoria’s daily newspapers

Published on January 24, 2018 10:57AM

Dave Cook, of Bigby’s Tree Service, watches after a final cut from his chainsaw brings down the second of a pair of cypress trees that had threatened the Flavel House in 2008.

The Daily Astorian

Dave Cook, of Bigby’s Tree Service, watches after a final cut from his chainsaw brings down the second of a pair of cypress trees that had threatened the Flavel House in 2008.

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This pile of boards fell off a trailer after a 1943 collision in Warrenton between a truck-trailer rig and an SP&S freight train.

The Daily Astorian

This pile of boards fell off a trailer after a 1943 collision in Warrenton between a truck-trailer rig and an SP&S freight train.

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10 years ago this week — 2008

“Buildable lands” sounds like jargon, but a group of Astoria leaders believes those two words signal the future of the community.

Astoria has room for more than 1,600 new homes within its existing urban growth boundary, a land-use consultant told a joint work session of the Astoria City Council and Planning Commission earlier this month. More than 600 would be second homes.

Matt Hastie, of Portland-based Cogan Owens Cogan LLC, presented the results of the buildable lands inventory and needs assessment he had been working on since May, with input from the commission. His inventory also showed that more vacant land in Astoria is zoned for multiple family dwelling and that there is a surplus of commercial land.

The National Marine Fisheries Service wants the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to deny a critical permit for the Bradwood landing liquefied natural gas project.

A five-foot bronze statue of Sacagawea and her baby was stolen from Fort Clatsop Saturday night.

The statue — which stood at the Netul landing area — disappeared sometime between 5:20 p.m. Saturday and 8:45 a.m. Sunday, according to Clatsop County Sheriff’s office Sgt. Kristen Hanthorn. It had been cut from its mounting bolts.

Vandals who wrecked a fiber-optic phone line are being blamed for causing the outage that left some 20,000 North Coast customers without phone service for much of Friday and part of Saturday.

The phone service was back on track today, with businesses lamenting disrupted operations and law agencies seeking the vandals who broke the line in the greater Kelso, Wash., area.

Clatsop County commissioners have a message for the public: Stay out of the forests. They’re dangerous right now.

So, they are trying to move quickly to hire a forester. They said they want a forester to assess the timber and get it harvested, to make the forests safer and to generate revenue from timber before markets get flooded with blow-down.

50 years ago — 1968

Treasure hunter Tony Mareno will resume drilling on the beach at Manzanita this weekend just outside the steel casing sunk 40 feet into the sand.

The Salem father of 11 said there is a possibility the big steel tube is about three feet off center from where he believes a multi-million dollar Spanish treasure is buried.

Astoria wore a white snow blanket Friday morning for the first time this winter.

The fall was about an inch deep on higher hills in town, thinning out to only a trace reported at the Clatsop Airport station of U.S. Weather bureau.

A truck-trailer rig loaded with lumber and an SP&S freight train collided early Monday at a grade crossing in downtown Warrenton, spewing two by fours over the road.

Ray Garlock was driving a Warrenton Lumber company truck towing two lumber-laden trailers in tandem. Driving slowly on snow-covered Harbor Drive, he apparently failed to see the approaching train on a little used track along Harbor Drive, until it was almost upon him.

WASHINGTON — Secretary of State Dean Rusk said today the North Korean seizure of the USS Pueblo could be considered “an act of war.” Diplomatic efforts to obtain the ship’s return have thus far failed.

75 years ago — 1943

The coffee situation in Astoria is becoming critical, D.J. Lewis, ration board chief, warned today and it may become necessary to curtail the quotas alloted to fraternal organizations, churches and clubs.

There have been a number of complaints turned into the board, Lewis said, of abuses in the ration program on the part of institutional users and that all the calls for coffee are not justifiable.

No more applications for coffee will be taken from institutions.

Six Astorians are hospitalized and 32 are homeless as a result of the fire that gutted the Astoria rooming and apartment house 527 Exchange Sunday afternoon and brought death close to a score of people. At 12:45 the fire was discovered by John “Bimmy” Elfving, who with his wife occupied an apartment on the ground floor of the building. The back porch of the structure was in flames, apparently resulting from a carelessly thrown cigarette in a pile of refuse.

John Niemi, 25, former Clatskanie and Astoria resident and now a member of the United States merchant marine, figures that he’s just been lucky so far in his journeys through the sub-infested waters of the seven seas. Three ships on which he has served as steward have been wrecked but so far he has not been subjected to either a bombing or torpedoing and he has no thrill-packed story of weeks adrift in a lifeboat to reveal.

Home for a short visit with relatives and friends, Niemi told briefly of how the last ship on which he served went aground on a coral reef in the south seas. The ship hit the reef near midnight but remained afloat for nearly 24 hours. All of the crew were rescued by a U.S. Navy cruiser, badly battered from the Guadalcanal battle, which answered the cargo vessel’s SOS.



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