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Events mark centennial of civil rights icon Fannie Lou Hamer

Mississippi-born civil rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer is being commemorated on what would have been her 100th birthday

Published on October 6, 2017 9:21AM

Last changed on October 6, 2017 1:17PM

A looming statue of Fannie Lou Hamer is displayed prominently in the Fannie Lou Hamer Memorial Garden in Ruleville, Miss., Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017, as a tribute honoring the civil rights activist. Hamer was a sharecropper who was beaten for registering other African-Americans to vote during the Jim Crow era, and gained international attention in 1964 when she testified before the credentials committee at the Democratic National Convention, as she and others challenged the sitting of an all-white delegation from Mississippi. A centennial celebration marking her birth is planned for Friday. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

The Associated Press

A looming statue of Fannie Lou Hamer is displayed prominently in the Fannie Lou Hamer Memorial Garden in Ruleville, Miss., Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017, as a tribute honoring the civil rights activist. Hamer was a sharecropper who was beaten for registering other African-Americans to vote during the Jim Crow era, and gained international attention in 1964 when she testified before the credentials committee at the Democratic National Convention, as she and others challenged the sitting of an all-white delegation from Mississippi. A centennial celebration marking her birth is planned for Friday. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

FILE-In this Aug. 22, 1964 photograph, Fannie Lou Hamer, a leader of the Freedom Democratic party, speaks before the credentials committee of the Democratic national convention in Atlantic City, in efforts to win accreditation for the largely African American group as Mississippi's delegation to the convention, instead of the all-white state delegation. Friday, Oct. 6, 2017 marks the 100th anniversary of her birth and a celebration is planned in her hometown of Ruleville, Miss., honoring her. (AP Photo/File)

The Associated Press

FILE-In this Aug. 22, 1964 photograph, Fannie Lou Hamer, a leader of the Freedom Democratic party, speaks before the credentials committee of the Democratic national convention in Atlantic City, in efforts to win accreditation for the largely African American group as Mississippi's delegation to the convention, instead of the all-white state delegation. Friday, Oct. 6, 2017 marks the 100th anniversary of her birth and a celebration is planned in her hometown of Ruleville, Miss., honoring her. (AP Photo/File)

Carl Watson, 58, of Ruleville, Miss., takes a break from cleaning out the pavilion of wasps and hornet nests, at the Fannie Lou Hamer Memorial Garden, speaks of how the late civil rights activist helped his parents obtain a home when he was a young boy, Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017. Watson, who was friends with Hamer and her late husband Perry

The Associated Press

Carl Watson, 58, of Ruleville, Miss., takes a break from cleaning out the pavilion of wasps and hornet nests, at the Fannie Lou Hamer Memorial Garden, speaks of how the late civil rights activist helped his parents obtain a home when he was a young boy, Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017. Watson, who was friends with Hamer and her late husband Perry "Pap" Hamer, is among a number of locals helping prepare the garden for the centennial celebration marking her birth, which is planned for Friday. Hamer was a sharecropper who was beaten for registering other African-Americans to vote during the Jim Crow era, and gained international attention in 1964 when she testified before the credentials committee at the Democratic National Convention, as she and others challenged the sitting of an all-white delegation from Mississippi. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

FILE - In this Sept. 17, 1965 file photo, Fannie Lou Hamer, of Ruleville, Miss., speaks to Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party sympathizers outside the Capitol in Washington after the House of Representatives rejected a challenger to the 1964 election of five Mississippi representatives. Friday, Oct. 6, 2017 marks the 100th anniversary of her birth and a celebration is planned in her hometown of Ruleville, Miss., honoring her. (AP Photo/William J. Smith, File)

The Associated Press

FILE - In this Sept. 17, 1965 file photo, Fannie Lou Hamer, of Ruleville, Miss., speaks to Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party sympathizers outside the Capitol in Washington after the House of Representatives rejected a challenger to the 1964 election of five Mississippi representatives. Friday, Oct. 6, 2017 marks the 100th anniversary of her birth and a celebration is planned in her hometown of Ruleville, Miss., honoring her. (AP Photo/William J. Smith, File)


JACKSON, Miss. (AP) Mississippi-born civil rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer is being commemorated on what would have been her 100th birthday.

Events Friday in her hometown of Ruleville are marking the centennial of her birth.

Hamer said she was "sick and tired of being sick and tired" of the abuse that African-Americans suffered in the segregated South.

She was fired from the plantation where she worked as a sharecropper in 1962 because she and a few other black Mississippians registered to vote.

In 1964, she was part of the integrated Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party group that challenged seating of the all-white Mississippi delegation at the Democratic National Convention. Hamer told a convention committee about being beaten for her civil rights work in 1963.

Hamer was 59 when she died of cancer in 1977.



 

 

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