The Daily Astorian | http://www.dailyastorian.com The Daily Astorian Fri, 27 May 2016 01:08:32 -0400 en http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/staticimage/images/rss-logo.jpg The Daily Astorian | http://www.dailyastorian.com Obama arrives in Hiroshima, becoming first sitting president to visit site where US dropped the first atomic bomb http://www.dailyastorian.com/obama-arrives-in-hiroshima-becoming-first-sitting-president-to-visit-site-where-us-dropped-the-first-atomic-bomb-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worlda02cb9fda61646e3b3fc18893b5375c2 http://www.dailyastorian.com/obama-arrives-in-hiroshima-becoming-first-sitting-president-to-visit-site-where-us-dropped-the-first-atomic-bomb-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worlda02cb9fda61646e3b3fc18893b5375c2#Comments Fri, 27 May 2016 01:01:59 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016305279883 HIROSHIMA, Japan (AP) — Obama arrives in Hiroshima, becoming first sitting president to visit site where US dropped the first atomic bomb.

]]>
AP Top U.S. News at 3:59 a.m. EDT http://www.dailyastorian.com/ap-top-us-news-at-359-am-edt-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world36d78d6bc187490b3f0fc4c30ef980fc http://www.dailyastorian.com/ap-top-us-news-at-359-am-edt-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world36d78d6bc187490b3f0fc4c30ef980fc#Comments Fri, 27 May 2016 01:00:20 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016305279953 Colorado governor's book raises Clinton veep speculationOnline dance craze sweeps police departments across USRapper facing charges in T.I. concert shootingNational Spelling Bee ends in its unlikeliest tie to dateCave escape: Rushing water, sucking mud and pitch blackSpike in crime in Las Vegas spurs search for causes, curesFlint residents hope pipe flushing will help get lead out]]> AP Top Sports News at 3:58 a.m. EDT http://www.dailyastorian.com/ap-top-sports-news-at-358-am-edt-da-ap-webfeeds-news-pro-sports642078dfbcb6e4515fc975477597dc53 http://www.dailyastorian.com/ap-top-sports-news-at-358-am-edt-da-ap-webfeeds-news-pro-sports642078dfbcb6e4515fc975477597dc53#Comments Fri, 27 May 2016 01:00:48 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016305279952 Finland names final World Cup roster with Patrik LaineTennis pros need a CEO's head on top of strong shouldersLEADING OFF: Dodgers' Urias set for major league debutAP Source: Rockets, D'Antoni agree on 4-year dealStephen Curry, LeBron James named first-team All-NBABaylor looks to rebuild after report on sex assaultsUS athletes tuneup for Olympic Trials at Prefontaine meet]]> Finland names final World Cup roster with Patrik Laine http://www.dailyastorian.com/finland-names-final-world-cup-roster-with-patrik-laine-da-ap-webfeeds-news-pro-sports5b05983e95614290bbaf755bd25f307b http://www.dailyastorian.com/finland-names-final-world-cup-roster-with-patrik-laine-da-ap-webfeeds-news-pro-sports5b05983e95614290bbaf755bd25f307b#Comments Fri, 27 May 2016 01:00:58 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016305279884 PRAGUE (AP) — Forward Patrik Laine is among the seven players added to Finland's roster for the World Cup of Hockey.

The 18-year-old Laine helped Finland claim silver at the world championships in Russia with seven goals and 12 points and was voted the tournament's MVP.

Laine, a No. 1 draft pick contender, won the top Finnish league with Tappara Tampere this season. The draft is scheduled for June 24-25.

Laine will team up with another 18-year-old forward, Carolina Hurricanes prospect Sebastian Aho, with whom he won the 2016 world junior championship.

The other five players who join the preliminary roster of 16 announced in March include forward Erik Haula, defensemen Ville Pokka, Sami Lepisto and Jyrki Jokipakka, and goaltender Mikko Koskinen.

The World Cup opens Sept. 17.

]]>
Obama ready to face historic, haunted ground of Hiroshima http://www.dailyastorian.com/obama-ready-to-face-historic-haunted-ground-of-hiroshima-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worldfd86ff19961149a7874ae6273748dd71 http://www.dailyastorian.com/obama-ready-to-face-historic-haunted-ground-of-hiroshima-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worldfd86ff19961149a7874ae6273748dd71#Comments Fri, 27 May 2016 01:00:23 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016305279897 HIROSHIMA, Japan (AP) — Convinced that the time for this moment is right at last, President Barack Obama on Friday will become the first American president to confront the historic and haunted ground of Hiroshima.

Here, at this place of so much suffering, where U.S. forces dropped the atomic bomb that gave birth to the nuclear age, Obama will pay tribute to the 140,000 people who died from the attack seven decades ago.

He will not apologize. He will not second-guess President Harry Truman's decision to unleash the awful power of nuclear weapons. He will not dissect Japanese aggression in World War II.

Rather, Obama aimed to offer a simple reflection, acknowledging the devastating toll of war and coupling it with a message that the world can — and must — do better.

He will look back, placing a wreath at the centopath, an arched monument in Hiroshima's Peace Memorial Park honoring those killed by the bomb that U.S. forces dropped on Aug. 6, 1945. A second atomic bomb, dropped on Nagasaki three days later, killed 70,000 more.

Obama will also look forward.

Hiroshima is a "testament to how even the most painful divide" can be bridged and former adversaries can become friends, Obama said as he stopped to briefly address U.S. troops at the Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni before his visit.

His trip, he said, was an "opportunity to honor the memory of all who were lost in World War II."

Those who come to ground zero at Hiroshima speak of its emotional impact, of the searing imagery of the exposed steel beams on the iconic A-bomb dome. The skeletal remains of the exhibition hall have become an international symbol of peace and a place for prayer.

The president will be accompanied on his visit by Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe — a demonstration of the friendship that exists between the only nation ever to use an atomic bomb and the only nation ever to have suffered from one.

Bomb survivor Kinuyo Ikegami, 82, paid her own respects at the cenotaph on Friday morning, well before Obama arrived, lighting incense and chanting a prayer.

Tears ran down her face as she described the immediate aftermath of the bomb.

"I could hear schoolchildren screaming: 'Help me! Help me!'" she said. "It was too pitiful, too horrible. Even now it fills me with emotion."

Han Jeong-soon, the 58-year-old daughter of a Korean survivor, was there too.

"The suffering, such as illness, gets carried on over the generations - that is what I want President Obama to know," she said. "I want him to understand our sufferings."

Obama's visit is a moment 70 years in the making. Other American presidents considered coming, but the politics were still too sensitive, the emotions too raw. Jimmy Carter visited as a former president in 1984.

Even now, when polls find 70 percent of the Japanese support Obama's decision to come to Hiroshima, Obama's visit is fraught.

His choreographed visit will be parsed by people with many agendas.

There are political foes at home who are ready to seize on any hint of an unwelcome expression of regret.

There are Koreans who want to hear the president acknowledge the estimated 20,000-40,000 of their citizens who were among the dead in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

There are blast survivors who want Obama to listen to their stories, to see their scars — physical and otherwise.

There are activists looking for a pledge of new, concrete steps to rid the world of nuclear weapons.

There are American former POWs who want the president to fault Japan for starting the war in the Pacific.

Obama will try to navigate those shoals by saying less, not more.

The dropping of the bomb, he said Thursday, "was an inflection point in modern history. It is something that all of us have had to deal with in one way or another."

___

Benac reported from Shima, Japan.

___

Follow Nancy Benac on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/nbenac

 ]]>
Colorado governor's book raises Clinton veep speculation http://www.dailyastorian.com/colorado-governors-book-raises-clinton-veep-speculation-da-ap-webfeeds-news-entertainment95cd991c81bc4216b57bc837a821aff2 http://www.dailyastorian.com/colorado-governors-book-raises-clinton-veep-speculation-da-ap-webfeeds-news-entertainment95cd991c81bc4216b57bc837a821aff2#Comments Fri, 27 May 2016 00:52:06 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016305279891 DENVER (AP) — John Hickenlooper, Colorado's term-limited Democratic governor, released a candid autobiography and is doing the book talk rounds this week, reviving speculation that he is positioning himself to join Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign ticket.

Hickenlooper insists he hasn't been approached by Clinton's camp, and he uses self-deprecating humor to deflect queries about his ambitions. But his name has come up before.

"Everyone says I'm on the short list," he said recently. "I think it's probably a long list; I'm probably closer to the bottom."

Hickenlooper is one of few Democratic governors who survived off-year Democratic routs over the past eight years. Virginia U.S. Sen. Tim Kaine is usually cited as a top candidate for vice president, along with Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro and Labor Secretary Tom Perez. Another name being floated is Ken Salazar, the former U.S. interior secretary and U.S. senator from Colorado.

Because of the primary challenge from Clinton's left flank posed by Bernie Sanders, there has been increased speculation she will turn to a Senate liberal for her vice president, like Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts or Sherrod Brown of Ohio. Both, however, hail from states where GOP governors would be able to appoint their replacement.

Yet both Democrats and Republicans in Colorado, a key presidential swing state, say a Clinton-Hickenlooper fit makes sense.

___

OIL TO BEER TO POLITICS

Laid off as an oil and gas geologist during a 1980s bust, Hickenlooper founded a brewpub in 1988 that helped trigger the transformation of Denver's gritty downtown warehouse district. The tireless civic booster was elected mayor in his first try at political office, re-elected, and helped bring the 2008 Democratic National Convention to Denver.

In 2010, Democratic Gov. Bill Ritter told Hickenlooper he wouldn't seek re-election and encouraged him to run. Hickenlooper did and beat a splintered Republican Party. Four years later, Hickenlooper narrowly defeated former Rep. Bob Beauprez in 2014's GOP-dominant election.

___

WHY HE'D FIT

— Colorado is crucial to victory in November. Hickenlooper's idiosyncratic humor and plain talk could boost Clinton's favorability ratings among voters. Clinton "needs to find someone who's likable, and John Hickenlooper's definitely likable," said Owen Loftus, a Republican campaign adviser.

— On divisive issues like guns and energy, Hickenlooper seeks consensus rather than confrontation.

Mike Stratton, a Democratic strategist in Denver, said Hickenlooper's record of bipartisan problem-solving makes him an appealing vice presidential candidate. "That kind of thing is at a premium everywhere in the country," Stratton said. "Obviously someone from the West helps balance the ticket."

— Hickenlooper has overseen a growing economy with unemployment at 3.1 percent, compared with 9.1 percent when he took office. Bill Cadman, state senate GOP majority leader, calls him a "great marketing director for the state."

— Hickenlooper reluctantly accepted voters' decision to create the nation's first recreational pot industry but insisted it be tightly regulated.

___

WHY NOT

— Hickenlooper is a friend of fracking, the gas-drilling procedure some Democrats find dangerous. Clinton alienated many by saying she'd put coal miners out of work.

"It's religion in the Democratic Party to oppose fracking, and I can see him having problems with the party's more liberal elements," said Dick Wadhams, a former Colorado Republican Party chair and political consultant.

— Hickenlooper was widely criticized in 2013 for granting an indefinite execution reprieve to a man who shot and killed four people at a Chuck E. Cheese restaurant. The governor said he wanted to put off a decision on the man's execution until another governor took office, a delay that struck both death-penalty supporters and opponents as cowardly.

— He's yet to find a solution with tax-averse Colorado Republicans to help Colorado's underfunded schools. In 2013, voters overwhelmingly rejected his plan for a $1 billion income tax increase for schools.

— Hickenlooper threw his weight in 2013 into the passage of universal background checks and gun magazine limits, something that could endear him to Democrats but infuriate Republicans already incensed at Clinton's gun control stance.

___

'COLORADO DOES NOT QUIT'

Coloradans' response to a series of disasters inspired the title of his book, "The Opposite of Woe," subtitled, "My Life in Beer and Politics."

In 2012, Colorado suffered the most destructive wildfires in state history and the Aurora theater shootings, in which James Holmes opened fire at a "Batman" movie, killing 12 people and wounding 70. The next year brought the assassination by an ex-felon of Colorado corrections chief Tom Clements, epic flooding that displaced thousands, and a high school shooting in which a student killed a classmate before taking his own life.

"Colorado does not quit," Hickenlooper writes. "What we showed the world is that Colorado is the opposite of woe."

Hickenlooper's self-portrait includes using pot as a teen and taking a nude selfie in a (filled) bathtub. He comes off as both bullied and rebellious as a youth. He kept his attempts to rescue his first marriage to the writer Helen Thorpe and his courtship of his second spouse, Robin Pringle, out of the public eye.

"It's certainly not the portrait of someone who's trying to prepare themselves to be a vice presidential candidate," Hickenlooper told reporters this week.

___

Associated Press writer Nicholas Riccardi contributed to this report.

___

James Anderson can be reached at http://www.twitter.com/jandersonap. Kristen Wyatt can be reached at http://www.twitter.com/APkristenwyatt

      ]]>
Colorado governor's book raises Clinton veep speculation http://www.dailyastorian.com/colorado-governors-book-raises-clinton-veep-speculation-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world95cd991c81bc4216b57bc837a821aff2 http://www.dailyastorian.com/colorado-governors-book-raises-clinton-veep-speculation-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world95cd991c81bc4216b57bc837a821aff2#Comments Fri, 27 May 2016 00:51:34 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016305279893 DENVER (AP) — John Hickenlooper, Colorado's term-limited Democratic governor, released a candid autobiography and is doing the book talk rounds this week, reviving speculation that he is positioning himself to join Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign ticket.

Hickenlooper insists he hasn't been approached by Clinton's camp, and he uses self-deprecating humor to deflect queries about his ambitions. But his name has come up before.

"Everyone says I'm on the short list," he said recently. "I think it's probably a long list; I'm probably closer to the bottom."

Hickenlooper is one of few Democratic governors who survived off-year Democratic routs over the past eight years. Virginia U.S. Sen. Tim Kaine is usually cited as a top candidate for vice president, along with Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro and Labor Secretary Tom Perez. Another name being floated is Ken Salazar, the former U.S. interior secretary and U.S. senator from Colorado.

Because of the primary challenge from Clinton's left flank posed by Bernie Sanders, there has been increased speculation she will turn to a Senate liberal for her vice president, like Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts or Sherrod Brown of Ohio. Both, however, hail from states where GOP governors would be able to appoint their replacement.

Yet both Democrats and Republicans in Colorado, a key presidential swing state, say a Clinton-Hickenlooper fit makes sense.

___

OIL TO BEER TO POLITICS

Laid off as an oil and gas geologist during a 1980s bust, Hickenlooper founded a brewpub in 1988 that helped trigger the transformation of Denver's gritty downtown warehouse district. The tireless civic booster was elected mayor in his first try at political office, re-elected, and helped bring the 2008 Democratic National Convention to Denver.

In 2010, Democratic Gov. Bill Ritter told Hickenlooper he wouldn't seek re-election and encouraged him to run. Hickenlooper did and beat a splintered Republican Party. Four years later, Hickenlooper narrowly defeated former Rep. Bob Beauprez in 2014's GOP-dominant election.

___

WHY HE'D FIT

— Colorado is crucial to victory in November. Hickenlooper's idiosyncratic humor and plain talk could boost Clinton's favorability ratings among voters. Clinton "needs to find someone who's likable, and John Hickenlooper's definitely likable," said Owen Loftus, a Republican campaign adviser.

— On divisive issues like guns and energy, Hickenlooper seeks consensus rather than confrontation.

Mike Stratton, a Democratic strategist in Denver, said Hickenlooper's record of bipartisan problem-solving makes him an appealing vice presidential candidate. "That kind of thing is at a premium everywhere in the country," Stratton said. "Obviously someone from the West helps balance the ticket."

— Hickenlooper has overseen a growing economy with unemployment at 3.1 percent, compared with 9.1 percent when he took office. Bill Cadman, state senate GOP majority leader, calls him a "great marketing director for the state."

— Hickenlooper reluctantly accepted voters' decision to create the nation's first recreational pot industry but insisted it be tightly regulated.

___

WHY NOT

— Hickenlooper is a friend of fracking, the gas-drilling procedure some Democrats find dangerous. Clinton alienated many by saying she'd put coal miners out of work.

"It's religion in the Democratic Party to oppose fracking, and I can see him having problems with the party's more liberal elements," said Dick Wadhams, a former Colorado Republican Party chair and political consultant.

— Hickenlooper was widely criticized in 2013 for granting an indefinite execution reprieve to a man who shot and killed four people at a Chuck E. Cheese restaurant. The governor said he wanted to put off a decision on the man's execution until another governor took office, a delay that struck both death-penalty supporters and opponents as cowardly.

— He's yet to find a solution with tax-averse Colorado Republicans to help Colorado's underfunded schools. In 2013, voters overwhelmingly rejected his plan for a $1 billion income tax increase for schools.

— Hickenlooper threw his weight in 2013 into the passage of universal background checks and gun magazine limits, something that could endear him to Democrats but infuriate Republicans already incensed at Clinton's gun control stance.

___

'COLORADO DOES NOT QUIT'

Coloradans' response to a series of disasters inspired the title of his book, "The Opposite of Woe," subtitled, "My Life in Beer and Politics."

In 2012, Colorado suffered the most destructive wildfires in state history and the Aurora theater shootings, in which James Holmes opened fire at a "Batman" movie, killing 12 people and wounding 70. The next year brought the assassination by an ex-felon of Colorado corrections chief Tom Clements, epic flooding that displaced thousands, and a high school shooting in which a student killed a classmate before taking his own life.

"Colorado does not quit," Hickenlooper writes. "What we showed the world is that Colorado is the opposite of woe."

Hickenlooper's self-portrait includes using pot as a teen and taking a nude selfie in a (filled) bathtub. He comes off as both bullied and rebellious as a youth. He kept his attempts to rescue his first marriage to the writer Helen Thorpe and his courtship of his second spouse, Robin Pringle, out of the public eye.

"It's certainly not the portrait of someone who's trying to prepare themselves to be a vice presidential candidate," Hickenlooper told reporters this week.

___

Associated Press writer Nicholas Riccardi contributed to this report.

___

James Anderson can be reached at http://www.twitter.com/jandersonap. Kristen Wyatt can be reached at http://www.twitter.com/APkristenwyatt

      ]]>
Man convicted in Tacoma killing; motive still unclear http://www.dailyastorian.com/man-convicted-in-tacoma-killing-motive-still-unclear-da-ap-webfeeds-news-northwest2c634c6fb3804c389c31f79d88dfcd47 http://www.dailyastorian.com/man-convicted-in-tacoma-killing-motive-still-unclear-da-ap-webfeeds-news-northwest2c634c6fb3804c389c31f79d88dfcd47#Comments Fri, 27 May 2016 00:50:16 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016305279885 TACOMA, Wash. (AP) — A 34-year-old man has been convicted of murder for the death of a man who was shot while sitting inside his parked vehicle in Tacoma.

The News Tribune reports (http://bit.ly/1P2EHdK ) that Vernon Lewis Curry Jr. was found guilty Thursday of first-degree murder in the September 2014 killing.

Pierce County prosecutors say Curry fired seven shots into Michael Ward Jr.'s car, striking the victim multiple times.

Police had found a ski mask near the scene that had Curry's DNA on it, but Curry argued that tests suggested another person's DNA had also been on the mask.

At trial, Curry also said he had been sleeping at home with his girlfriend during the incident, which she confirmed.

Deputy Prosecutor Neil Horibe says a motive was never determined for the shooting.

___

Information from: The News Tribune, http://www.thenewstribune.com

]]>
Cave escape: Rushing water, sucking mud and pitch black http://www.dailyastorian.com/cave-escape-rushing-water-sucking-mud-and-pitch-black-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world93ec8e68caaa416cb11004b3506fd446 http://www.dailyastorian.com/cave-escape-rushing-water-sucking-mud-and-pitch-black-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world93ec8e68caaa416cb11004b3506fd446#Comments Fri, 27 May 2016 00:50:37 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016305279886 HORSE CAVE, Ky. (AP) — Gary Russell was a mile deep in a Kentucky cave, leading a group of geology students on a five-hour tour, when he turned a corner and saw water rushing by where water wasn't supposed to be.

He had no way to communicate with the outside world Thursday afternoon. He had no idea that a flash flood was pouring through the cave's passages toward them, or that dozens of rescuers were already gathering at the entrance to begin a perilous hours-long journey to rescue them.

All he knew was that water wasn't supposed to be this deep in the cave and that meant trouble.

Russell and his group were among 19 people who escaped the flooded Hidden River Cave. They navigated neck-deep water, rushing currents and mud so thick it sucked off the police chief's boot. It was pitch black.

"It was shooting waterfalls out of the ceiling. The walls were thundering, there was so much water moving through it," said David Foster, the executive director of the American Cave Museum at Horse Cave and a guide for 30 years, who rushed into the darkness to help with the rescue. "You just don't know what Mother Nature is capable of. There's only so much cave, and there's way more water."

The group that spent more than six hours inside the cave included Clemson University students, four tour guides and two police officers who got trapped when they tried to rescue the group, Kentucky State Police Trooper B.J. Eaton said.

There was no communication between the stranded cavers and the more than 150 emergency personnel at the scene. Authorities didn't know exactly where the missing cavers were underground, and the only light the group had came from headlamps they wore.

Heavy rains began pouring down hours after the group ventured inside, Foster said. The storm hit earlier and harder than expected, and Foster grew so worried that he decided to call authorities and trek inside to get them.

The cavers were a group of college students from Clemson University in South Carolina on a field trip to explore the water system in the cave. Russell led four of them on what was supposed to be a five-hour trip beginning at 10 a.m., and another guide had a dozen. Until Russell noticed the water, they were unaware of the rising waters threatening to block the cave's entrance, which is the lowest point and first to flood.

Hidden River Cave begins at a sinkhole, 150-feet deep, in the center of downtown Horse Cave. It has two subterranean rivers that flow more than 100 feet below ground.

As Russell tried to lead his group out, the mist grew so thick it kept fogging up one student's glasses. He could barely see and kept stumbling.

"Just imagine going hiking in the mountains at night during a rainstorm and a mudslide," Russell said. "That's what this feels like. The water was so loud, it was like a jetliner; it was roaring."

Russell and his group were surprised to find the rescuers at the cave's mouth. But the other guide's group was still unaccounted for.

Foster and Police Chief Sean Henry began working their way deeper into the cave. The water was waist high in places and rising. There's only one way out, and they knew they'd have to come back out the way they came in. At one point, Henry said he saw the water closing in behind him and wondered if he'd ever leave. He held his flashlight in one hand and radio in the other, though his radio stopped picking up a signal shortly after they entered.

They could hear nothing over the roar of the water. Foster started to doubt he'd come down the right passage. He said anxiety built like a rock in his stomach. Then they heard it: "We're here. We're OK!" The students had shouted after seeing their flashlights.

The way out was the most precarious, when they had to wade and swim through high water, Foster said. But they all made it through. They emerged about 4:30 p.m. Everyone lost was accounted for and uninjured.

"When they came out of the cave, they were neck-deep in water," Hart County Emergency Management Director Kerry McDaniel said.

"I've never been more happy to see the sunlight," Foster said. "It's such a good feeling when you get around the corner and you see the light, and you know you're going to make it out. What a relief."

___

Schreiner reported from Louisville, Kentucky. Beth Campbell in Louisville contributed to this report.

        ]]>
Closing arguments next in 'Shield' actor's murder trial http://www.dailyastorian.com/closing-arguments-next-in-shield-actors-murder-trial-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worldd352e18639bc4d5c85c8c713811e83e8 http://www.dailyastorian.com/closing-arguments-next-in-shield-actors-murder-trial-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worldd352e18639bc4d5c85c8c713811e83e8#Comments Fri, 27 May 2016 00:41:39 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016305279888 LOS ANGELES (AP) — Closing arguments are scheduled on Friday in the murder trial of Michel Jace, who played a police officer on television, with dueling portrayals of the actor presented to a jury.

Is Jace a calculating killer, who shot his wife in the back and then in the legs after taunting her about her love of running? Or was the actor, distraught over the impending end of his marriage of nine years, so distraught that he shot and killed his wife April in the heat of passion?

A jury of six men and six women will have to decide after hearing closing arguments whether to convict "The Shield" actor of first-degree murder, or choose a lesser charge such as voluntary manslaughter.

Jace acknowledges he shot and killed his wife on May 19, 2014, in their Los Angeles home. He waited for police after calling 911 and gave a lengthy interview to detectives in which he told them he wanted to inflict pain on April Jace and planned to shoot her in the leg with her father's revolver.

Instead, Jace shot her three times and fired two shots into her legs in a hallway within sight of their young sons, who were ages 5 and 8 at the time.

Jace's now 10-year-old son testified Wednesday that he heard his father tell his mother, "'If you like running, then run to heaven.'"

Michael Jace, who had small roles in films such as "Boogie Nights," ''Forrest Gump" and the television show "Southland," had been out of work for years and financial struggles put a strain on their marriage.

April Jace, who earlier that day had told her husband she wanted a divorce, was killed moments after returning to their home after a youth baseball game. Text messages presented during the trial show Michael Jace had told his wife he had left their home, but instead was waiting with the loaded handgun.

He told detectives he planned to kill himself, but couldn't follow through. He also said he shot his wife the first time after she lunged at him.

"I was just angry," Michael Jace told investigators, according to a transcript released Thursday. "All I intended to do was shoot her in the leg. And then I shot her in the leg and that was it."

In opening statements, Deputy District Attorney Tannaz Mokayef portrayed Jace as a calculating killer.

"You will hear that on May 19, 2014, the defendant took a loaded gun, a revolver, and waited for his wife to come home and then shot her in the back and then shot her two more times in front of their kids," Mokayef told jurors.

Jace's attorney Jamon Hicks called the case tragic in opening statements Tuesday that case boiled down to the actor's mindset at the time of the killing, and whether it was premeditated. "This case is not about how it was done. We acknowledge it. We accept responsibility," Hicks said. "This case is about why it was done."

If convicted of first-degree murder, Jace faces 50 years to life in prison.

___

Anthony McCartney can be reached at http://twitter.com/mccartneyAP

]]>
Closing arguments next in 'Shield' actor's murder trial http://www.dailyastorian.com/closing-arguments-next-in-shield-actors-murder-trial-da-ap-webfeeds-news-entertainmentd352e18639bc4d5c85c8c713811e83e8 http://www.dailyastorian.com/closing-arguments-next-in-shield-actors-murder-trial-da-ap-webfeeds-news-entertainmentd352e18639bc4d5c85c8c713811e83e8#Comments Fri, 27 May 2016 00:42:19 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016305279889 LOS ANGELES (AP) — Closing arguments are scheduled on Friday in the murder trial of Michel Jace, who played a police officer on television, with dueling portrayals of the actor presented to a jury.

Is Jace a calculating killer, who shot his wife in the back and then in the legs after taunting her about her love of running? Or was the actor, distraught over the impending end of his marriage of nine years, so distraught that he shot and killed his wife April in the heat of passion?

A jury of six men and six women will have to decide after hearing closing arguments whether to convict "The Shield" actor of first-degree murder, or choose a lesser charge such as voluntary manslaughter.

Jace acknowledges he shot and killed his wife on May 19, 2014, in their Los Angeles home. He waited for police after calling 911 and gave a lengthy interview to detectives in which he told them he wanted to inflict pain on April Jace and planned to shoot her in the leg with her father's revolver.

Instead, Jace shot her three times and fired two shots into her legs in a hallway within sight of their young sons, who were ages 5 and 8 at the time.

Jace's now 10-year-old son testified Wednesday that he heard his father tell his mother, "'If you like running, then run to heaven.'"

Michael Jace, who had small roles in films such as "Boogie Nights," ''Forrest Gump" and the television show "Southland," had been out of work for years and financial struggles put a strain on their marriage.

April Jace, who earlier that day had told her husband she wanted a divorce, was killed moments after returning to their home after a youth baseball game. Text messages presented during the trial show Michael Jace had told his wife he had left their home, but instead was waiting with the loaded handgun.

He told detectives he planned to kill himself, but couldn't follow through. He also said he shot his wife the first time after she lunged at him.

"I was just angry," Michael Jace told investigators, according to a transcript released Thursday. "All I intended to do was shoot her in the leg. And then I shot her in the leg and that was it."

In opening statements, Deputy District Attorney Tannaz Mokayef portrayed Jace as a calculating killer.

"You will hear that on May 19, 2014, the defendant took a loaded gun, a revolver, and waited for his wife to come home and then shot her in the back and then shot her two more times in front of their kids," Mokayef told jurors.

Jace's attorney Jamon Hicks called the case tragic in opening statements Tuesday that case boiled down to the actor's mindset at the time of the killing, and whether it was premeditated. "This case is not about how it was done. We acknowledge it. We accept responsibility," Hicks said. "This case is about why it was done."

If convicted of first-degree murder, Jace faces 50 years to life in prison.

___

Anthony McCartney can be reached at http://twitter.com/mccartneyAP

]]>
AP Top Entertainment News at 3:41 a.m. EDT http://www.dailyastorian.com/ap-top-entertainment-news-at-341-am-edt-da-ap-webfeeds-news-entertainment6f25534c913d63f366f0dc00fc16ce13 http://www.dailyastorian.com/ap-top-entertainment-news-at-341-am-edt-da-ap-webfeeds-news-entertainment6f25534c913d63f366f0dc00fc16ce13#Comments Fri, 27 May 2016 00:42:18 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016305279946 Rapper facing charges in T.I. concert shootingDark musical 'American Psycho' feels the knifeBeach concert, ocean rituals herald summer at Jersey shoreTrump agrees to debate Sanders but sets stiff priceSpielberg to Harvard grads: Be the movie heroes of real lifeMemorable words from the National Spelling Bee]]> Village where children climb cliffside ladder may get stairs http://www.dailyastorian.com/village-where-children-climb-cliffside-ladder-may-get-stairs-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world1caaa2395b4a451d9ed21ee8867cf77b http://www.dailyastorian.com/village-where-children-climb-cliffside-ladder-may-get-stairs-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world1caaa2395b4a451d9ed21ee8867cf77b#Comments Fri, 27 May 2016 00:41:40 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016305279887 BEIJING (AP) — A village in China's mountainous west where schoolchildren must climb an 800-meter (2,625-foot)-high bamboo ladder secured to a sheer cliff face may get a set of steel stairs to improve safety.

The concerns arose after striking pictures were taken of the children climbing the ladder in Sichuan province's Zhaojue county, in a scene that underscores the vast gap in development between China's prosperous, modern east and parts of the remote inland west that remain mired in poverty.

The ladder is the only access to the village of Atuleer to which the children return every two weeks from the school at which they board. The 72 families who live there are members of the Yi minority group and subsist mainly by farming potatoes, walnuts and chili peppers.

A news release Friday from the Liangshan prefectural government that oversees the county said a set of stairs would be built as a stop-gap measure while officials consider a longer-term solution. It quoted local residents as saying that in addition to the safety issue, the ladder-only access exposed villagers to exploitation because traders knew they would be unable to carry unsold produce back up the cliff.

"The most important issue at hand is to solve the transport issue. That will allow us to make larger-scale plans about opening up the economy and looking for opportunities in tourism," county Communist Party Secretary General Jikejingsong was quoted as saying in the news release.

   ]]>
Baylor looks to rebuild after report on sex assaults http://www.dailyastorian.com/baylor-looks-to-rebuild-after-report-on-sex-assaults-da-ap-webfeeds-news-pro-sports74ad09790527476aae11a9541c6fd17a http://www.dailyastorian.com/baylor-looks-to-rebuild-after-report-on-sex-assaults-da-ap-webfeeds-news-pro-sports74ad09790527476aae11a9541c6fd17a#Comments Fri, 27 May 2016 01:01:09 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016305279925 AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Baylor University will be looking to rebuild its reputation and perhaps its football program after an outside review found administrators mishandled allegations of sexual assault and the team ran with an attitude that it was above the rules.

The largest Baptist school in the U.S. took the first steps Thursday when regents demoted high-profile President Ken Starr, a former prosecutor who investigated the Bill Clinton-Monica Lewinsky scandal, and fired football coach Art Briles, who turned the football program from a laughing stock into a Big 12 powerhouse.

But that may not end the scrutiny.

More fallout could be coming if the report by Philadelphia law firm Pepper Hamilton attracts the attention of the U.S. Department of Education, the NCAA or even criminal prosecutors.

Briles and the university are also still defendants in a federal civil lawsuit filed by a woman who says the school was casually indifferent to her pleas when she was assaulted in 2012. And the question remains whether Baylor will fire more coaches and staff in the coming days.

The report didn't identify specific cases the school is accused of mishandling. But two football players have been convicted of sexual assault since 2014, and in the past year, there have been multiple reports of other assaults and women who said the school did nothing to help.

"We were horrified by the extent of these acts of sexual violence on our campus," Baylor regents chairman Richard Willis said. "The depth to which these acts occurred shocked and outraged us. Our students and their families deserve better."

The review found that under Starr, school administrators discouraged students from reporting or participating in student conduct reviews of sexual assault complaints and even contributed to or accommodated a "hostile" environment against the alleged victims.

In one case, the actions of administrators "constituted retaliation against a complainant for reporting sexual assault," the report said.

University leadership was also slow to enact federally required student conduct processes, and administrators failed to identify and eliminate the hostile environment toward victims.

In a statement, the U.S. Department of Education, which enforces anti-gender discrimination regulations at universities, said Baylor had taken steps to satisfy federal requirements.

But the agency said it "will not hesitate to investigate if necessary and if we receive a complaint within our jurisdiction."

As for potential NCAA violations, Willis said regents had contacted college sport's governing body "to initially discuss potential infractions." He did not elaborate.

While critical of Baylor administrators, the most egregious faults the report found were with Briles' football program.

Coaches and athletics administrators ran their own improper investigations into rape claims, and in some cases chose not to report the allegations to an administrator outside of athletics, the report said.

By running their own "untrained" investigations and meeting directly with a complainant, football staff "improperly discredited" complainants' claims and "denied them a right to a fair, impartial and informed investigation," it said.

At times, football coaches and staff took steps to divert cases from student conduct or criminal procedures, acting in ways that "reinforced an overall perception that football was above the rules," the report said.

Briles did not respond to requests for comment. His daughter, Staley Lebby, called Briles' ouster a "media witch hunt" and said her father is a "man of incredible character" in a Facebook post.

For Starr, whose dogged investigation of Clinton's relationship with White House intern Lewinsky eventually led to Clinton's 1998 impeachment, it is a stunning fall.

He is out of the operational leadership of the university but gets to stay at Baylor with the title chancellor while teaching in the law school.

In a statement, Starr apologized to "those victims who were not treated with the care, concern, and support they deserve."

He insisted he didn't learn about the problems until fall 2015 and launched investigations as soon as he did. Starr initiated the Pepper Hamilton report that ultimately forced him out.

"Despite these dark days, I remain resolved to join hands with the Baylor family to continue to build the University as we carry out its distinct mission in Christian higher education. May God grant us grace, mercy, and peace," Starr said.

___

Follow Jim Vertuno on Twitter at https://twitter.com/JimVertuno

     ]]>
Baylor looks to rebuild after report on sex assaults http://www.dailyastorian.com/baylor-looks-to-rebuild-after-report-on-sex-assaults-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world74ad09790527476aae11a9541c6fd17a http://www.dailyastorian.com/baylor-looks-to-rebuild-after-report-on-sex-assaults-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world74ad09790527476aae11a9541c6fd17a#Comments Fri, 27 May 2016 00:41:43 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016305279927 AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Baylor University will be looking to rebuild its reputation and perhaps its football program after an outside review found administrators mishandled allegations of sexual assault and the team ran with an attitude that it was above the rules.

The largest Baptist school in the U.S. took the first steps Thursday when regents demoted high-profile President Ken Starr, a former prosecutor who investigated the Bill Clinton-Monica Lewinsky scandal, and fired football coach Art Briles, who turned the football program from a laughing stock into a Big 12 powerhouse.

But that may not end the scrutiny.

More fallout could be coming if the report by Philadelphia law firm Pepper Hamilton attracts the attention of the U.S. Department of Education, the NCAA or even criminal prosecutors.

Briles and the university are also still defendants in a federal civil lawsuit filed by a woman who says the school was casually indifferent to her pleas when she was assaulted in 2012. And the question remains whether Baylor will fire more coaches and staff in the coming days.

The report didn't identify specific cases the school is accused of mishandling. But two football players have been convicted of sexual assault since 2014, and in the past year, there have been multiple reports of other assaults and women who said the school did nothing to help.

"We were horrified by the extent of these acts of sexual violence on our campus," Baylor regents chairman Richard Willis said. "The depth to which these acts occurred shocked and outraged us. Our students and their families deserve better."

The review found that under Starr, school administrators discouraged students from reporting or participating in student conduct reviews of sexual assault complaints and even contributed to or accommodated a "hostile" environment against the alleged victims.

In one case, the actions of administrators "constituted retaliation against a complainant for reporting sexual assault," the report said.

University leadership was also slow to enact federally required student conduct processes, and administrators failed to identify and eliminate the hostile environment toward victims.

In a statement, the U.S. Department of Education, which enforces anti-gender discrimination regulations at universities, said Baylor had taken steps to satisfy federal requirements.

But the agency said it "will not hesitate to investigate if necessary and if we receive a complaint within our jurisdiction."

As for potential NCAA violations, Willis said regents had contacted college sport's governing body "to initially discuss potential infractions." He did not elaborate.

While critical of Baylor administrators, the most egregious faults the report found were with Briles' football program.

Coaches and athletics administrators ran their own improper investigations into rape claims, and in some cases chose not to report the allegations to an administrator outside of athletics, the report said.

By running their own "untrained" investigations and meeting directly with a complainant, football staff "improperly discredited" complainants' claims and "denied them a right to a fair, impartial and informed investigation," it said.

At times, football coaches and staff took steps to divert cases from student conduct or criminal procedures, acting in ways that "reinforced an overall perception that football was above the rules," the report said.

Briles did not respond to requests for comment. His daughter, Staley Lebby, called Briles' ouster a "media witch hunt" and said her father is a "man of incredible character" in a Facebook post.

For Starr, whose dogged investigation of Clinton's relationship with White House intern Lewinsky eventually led to Clinton's 1998 impeachment, it is a stunning fall.

He is out of the operational leadership of the university but gets to stay at Baylor with the title chancellor while teaching in the law school.

In a statement, Starr apologized to "those victims who were not treated with the care, concern, and support they deserve."

He insisted he didn't learn about the problems until fall 2015 and launched investigations as soon as he did. Starr initiated the Pepper Hamilton report that ultimately forced him out.

"Despite these dark days, I remain resolved to join hands with the Baylor family to continue to build the University as we carry out its distinct mission in Christian higher education. May God grant us grace, mercy, and peace," Starr said.

___

Follow Jim Vertuno on Twitter at https://twitter.com/JimVertuno

     ]]>
AP Top News at 3:38 a.m. EDT http://www.dailyastorian.com/ap-top-news-at-338-am-edt-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worldb82e426c47b4542cf77528e280dcc381 http://www.dailyastorian.com/ap-top-news-at-338-am-edt-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worldb82e426c47b4542cf77528e280dcc381#Comments Fri, 27 May 2016 00:40:15 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016305279947 Dump Trump? Some millennials aren't so sureOrigin of key Clinton emails from report are a mysteryG7 leaders pledge collective action on sagging global growthFinal vote on impeachment could come 3 days before OlympicsGroup escapes Kentucky cave through neck-deep water]]> Woman killed, 2 children injured in stabbing http://www.dailyastorian.com/woman-killed-2-children-injured-in-stabbing-da-ap-webfeeds-news-northwestf32a03fcf7ac4cc4b181f14a3afda144 http://www.dailyastorian.com/woman-killed-2-children-injured-in-stabbing-da-ap-webfeeds-news-northwestf32a03fcf7ac4cc4b181f14a3afda144#Comments Fri, 27 May 2016 00:40:12 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016305279890 MILTON-FREEWATER, Ore. (AP) — Authorities say a 26-year-old man has been arrested after a stabbing in Umatilla County left one woman dead and two children wounded.

Oscar Villegas Garcia was arrested Thursday after Oregon State Police responded to a home in Milton-Freewater. Police say Garcia had cut wounds that they believe were self-inflicted.

Officers had arrived to the home to find 24-year-old Maria Villegas, a two-year-old boy and a four-year-old girl suffering from stab and cut wounds.

The three were taken to a hospital, where Villegas died.

The suspect was treated at a hospital and released into police custody.

]]>
Dump Trump? Some millennials aren't so sure http://www.dailyastorian.com/dump-trump-some-millennials-arent-so-sure-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world14bf30b4f301465b861daa06ea6d9c9d http://www.dailyastorian.com/dump-trump-some-millennials-arent-so-sure-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world14bf30b4f301465b861daa06ea6d9c9d#Comments Fri, 27 May 2016 00:40:22 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016305279896 COSTA MESA, Calif. (AP) — Brendan De Regla drove three hours and waited in line for half a day to see Donald Trump speak at a rally in Southern California.

Dozens of college-aged protesters shouted on the other side of a police line, but De Regla, 22, stood unwaveringly in support of Trump.

"I just fell in love with him immediately," he said, sporting a "Make America Great Again" T-shirt. "Since day one, I've loved him. But I knew it would take some time for people to figure out what he was about and what he was going to do and it's finally happening."

While most polls show Bernie Sanders is the overwhelming favorite of millennials — voters between the ages of 18 and 35 —some young voters are taking a serious look at Trump as the primary season rolls on. In a Harvard Institute of Politics poll out this spring, 25 percent of people under 30 said they would vote for Trump if he faced off against Hillary Clinton in the fall.

Sanders still has the clear advantage among millennials, and the same Harvard poll shows 80 percent of young people with a very favorable opinion of Sanders would vote for Clinton if he drops out.

But young voters are united in their anger and disillusionment, having come of age during the Great Recession. Trump has tapped into that subset of those voters in the same way as Sanders, despite their radically different policy proposals, said Morley Winograd, a senior fellow at the University of Southern California who has authored books on millennials.

Young voters think: "'The system is rigged, I need somebody to totally overthrow the system' and that's what Trump says he's going to do and that's what Sanders says he's going to do," he said. "You can understand where there might be those commonalities."

Millennials are also deeply suspicious of corporate power and bureaucracy, in part because many watched their own families suffer during the economic meltdown. That leads to a greater distrust of Clinton, who is seen as part of the establishment; 53 percent of those under 30 say they dislike Clinton, according to the Harvard IOP poll.

"Right now, their disapproval of her is kind of hard to watch in some ways," said Kei Kawashima-Ginsberg, director of the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement at Tufts University, which has studied millennial voting patterns in this election. What seems to be missing is party loyalty among young people who are voting, Kawashima-Ginsberg said. "It seems to be a mistake to assume that because there's a Democratic Party nominee that they will vote for that person."

That's already been the case for 28-year-old Newport Beach voter Kevin Morton.

Morton, who is black, voted for Barack Obama in 2008, but then he lost his house to foreclosure during the recession and was unemployed for a year.

Now a self-employed small business owner, Morton said he began to follow politics more closely and studied up on what caused the economic collapse and world politics.

He briefly considered Sanders for his honesty, but ultimately settled on Trump because Sanders is "too hippyish."

"I'm going to vote Republican this election but that doesn't mean I'm Republican. ... This is a choice we're making for the next four years."

Even some of the youngest millennials who didn't suffer the brunt of the recession see promise in Trump.

Jeremy Wiggins, 20, is a junior at the University of Missouri and a delegate to the Republican National Convention.

He plans to vote for Trump at the convention although he, too, respects Sanders for his message, he said.

"You have an honesty (with) Sanders or Trump, an honesty with your candidate," he said. "But for why you'd choose Trump over Sanders, for somebody my age you're going to be in the job market very soon, starting your first job, getting health insurance and ... we want the jobs to be there."

Trump is still a long way from cementing the support of these voters, who "grew up with this cultural norm of not bullying, being inclusive and with diversity being seen as a strength, not a weakness," said Thad Kousser, a professor of political science at the University of California, San Diego.

"Donald Trump has to talk in a different way if he's going to get these voters. He can't just be that bully who says we need these jobs back," he said. "He needs a message for people who are still looking for good jobs and who are more comfortable with the new face of America."

Ian Smith, a 24-year-old who works with adolescents in drug and mental health rehab, showed up at the same Trump rally in suburban Southern California.

He grew up with a Democratic activist mother but was torn between Trump and Sanders before he was turned off on Trump by what he called the hatefulness of the crowd.

Now, he prefers Sanders, but says Trump might come back into consideration in a potential race with Clinton, who he thinks is an opportunist and a liar.

"To be perfectly honest, I'd flip a coin," Smith said of a choice between Trump and Clinton. "I don't like either, but I'm going to vote, no matter what."

____

Follow Gillian Flaccus on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/gflaccus

]]>
Philips lights up Amsterdam stock exchange with IPO http://www.dailyastorian.com/philips-lights-up-amsterdam-stock-exchange-with-ipo-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worldea5cd476980d4a86aa6cf7a6de9bd7e0 http://www.dailyastorian.com/philips-lights-up-amsterdam-stock-exchange-with-ipo-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worldea5cd476980d4a86aa6cf7a6de9bd7e0#Comments Fri, 27 May 2016 00:31:43 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016305279894 AMSTERDAM (AP) — Shares in the lighting division of Dutch electronics giant Philips have soared, early on their first day of trading on the Amsterdam exchange.

The price for Friday's initial public offering was set at 20 euros ($22.36) per share, giving the newly independent unit a market capitalization of 3 billion euros ($3.3 billion), but investors quickly drove the price up more than 7 percent to 21.44 euros ($23.97).

Philips was selling at least 25 percent of shares in its lighting unit in the IPO, which the company said was "multiple times oversubscribed."

Philips, which started life in 1891 making carbon filament lamps, announced earlier this month that it planned to spin off its iconic lighting division so it can focus on its future as a health technology provider.

]]>
AP Top Political News at 3:28 a.m. EDT http://www.dailyastorian.com/ap-top-political-news-at-328-am-edt-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worldb094d0c17aec072fb56d2016d086dc76 http://www.dailyastorian.com/ap-top-political-news-at-328-am-edt-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worldb094d0c17aec072fb56d2016d086dc76#Comments Fri, 27 May 2016 00:30:41 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016305279899 Dump Trump? Some millennials aren't so sureOver the top: Trump sews up delegates to seal GOP nominationThe Latest: Obama: Hiroshima visit honors all lost in WWIILibertarian Gary Johnson to never-Trumpers: 'I'm it'Mister 1,237: North Dakota delegate puts Trump over the topTrump agrees to debate Sanders but sets stiff priceObama: Allies 'rattled' by Trump; Trump blasts ObamaAfter focus on social issues, Pence facing tough re-election]]> Online dance craze sweeps police departments across US http://www.dailyastorian.com/online-dance-craze-sweeps-police-departments-across-us-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worlda070fe38f5694e5899d83ac211b72f91 http://www.dailyastorian.com/online-dance-craze-sweeps-police-departments-across-us-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worlda070fe38f5694e5899d83ac211b72f91#Comments Fri, 27 May 2016 00:31:51 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016305279892 LOS ANGELES (AP) — In an online sensation, police officers across the U.S. are dancing an updated version of the running man to a catchy 1990s hip hop song in videos that have included professional sports mascots, cheerleading squads and at least one explosion.

The videos, set to "My Boo" by Ghost Town DJ's, began in early May after police in New Zealand issued the Running Man Challenge to the New York Police Department. The meme started with two teenagers in New Jersey and became viral after college basketball teams picked it up.

The police videos posted on the Internet have been steadily getting more elaborate and more popular, with even some police chiefs joining in.

Los Angeles officers filmed themselves dancing inside the Dodgers baseball stadium and at a popular hiking spot in the shadow of the Hollywood sign. Detroit officers did their dance after spilling out of a heavy-duty SWAT truck in front of a General Motors building, and Miami's men and women in blue threw in some salsa moves to Gloria Estefan's "Conga."

The videos are about more than officers cutting loose. They come as police departments across the U.S. are facing increased scrutiny and public criticism in the wake of a series of officer-involved deaths of young, unarmed black people.

Many departments have been working to become more community-friendly and improve their image. That includes turning to the power of social media.

"Across this nation, there's a lot of anti-police rhetoric," Detroit police Chief James Craig told reporters this week. "Do you believe this might have a profound impact on reducing that? I mean, you talk about how many shares so far? People like it, they appreciate it, and this is a move in the right direction."

In his department's video, one of the most popular with seven million views since Tuesday, Craig busted moves underneath the city's iconic Joe Louis fist. In a move parodying a mic drop, Craig then dropped a police belt and challenged Chicago, Philadelphia and Cincinnati, Ohio. He has also challenged New York and Los Angeles, indicating their videos aren't good enough.

Police departments are smart to take on the challenge, said Robert Thompson, a Syracuse University professor and a leading authority on American pop culture.

"This is a rhetorical act of public relations. No question about it," he said. "Having the police force, uniformed police especially, smiling and dancing with people within the context of these communities, is certainly a positive message.

"It's what a Coca Cola ad does, what a propaganda film does, what a public relations campaign does — try to make us think differently about something," he said.

The videos have drawn criticism from some who question the use of police resources. Mostly, the response has been positive.

"Just when I thought my faith in the police was over," Los Angeles resident Trayvon Walker commented on the LAPD's video. "They do a video like this that puts a smile on my face and makes me look at them and say, 'They're not so bad of people after all.'"

As a young, black man, Walker said he has experienced police discrimination and his view of officers has eroded in recent years. But he said the video reminded him that there are plenty of good cops.

"It doesn't change my perception of the police, but I do think more of them in the community doing positive things will lead to more positive outcomes," the 29-year-old court clerk said in a phone interview. "To be able to see LAPD, or just police in general, doing something that is good for our community — it's pleasant to see."

___

Follow Amanda Lee Myers on Twitter at https://twitter.com/AmandaLeeAP. Her work can be found at http://bigstory.ap.org/content/amanda-lee-myers.

    ]]>
Origin of key Clinton emails from report are a mystery http://www.dailyastorian.com/origin-of-key-clinton-emails-from-report-are-a-mystery-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world448aebdc154648db9ed23bf578cc8c09 http://www.dailyastorian.com/origin-of-key-clinton-emails-from-report-are-a-mystery-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world448aebdc154648db9ed23bf578cc8c09#Comments Fri, 27 May 2016 00:30:32 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016305279895 WASHINGTON (AP) — Since her use of a private email server was made public last year, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton has insisted she turned over all work-related emails to the State Department to be released to the public.

But after 14 months of public scrutiny and the release of tens of thousands of emails, an agency watchdog's discovery of at least three previously undisclosed emails has renewed concerns that Clinton was not completely forthcoming when she turned over a trove of 55,000 pages of emails. And the revelation has spawned fresh criticism from presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump.

The three messages — which appear to have been found among electronic files of four former top Clinton State Department aides — included Clinton's own explanation of why she wanted her emails kept private. In a November 2010, email, Clinton worried that her personal messages could become accessible to outsiders.

Two other messages a year later divulged possible security weaknesses in the home email system she used while secretary of state. The Clinton campaign has previously denied that her home server was compromised.

On Thursday, Clinton, who has called her use of a private email server "a mistake," said she had been forthcoming with her personal emails and said she believed her use of a private email account was allowed.

"I have provided all of my work-related emails, and I've asked that they be made public, and I think that demonstrates that I wanted to make sure that this information was part of the official records," Clinton said, according to an interview transcript provided by ABC News.

Most of Clinton's emails have been made public by the State Department over the past year due to both a court order and Clinton's willingness to turn them over. But hundreds were censored for national security reasons and 22 emails were completely withheld because the agency said they contained top secret material — a matter now under investigation by the FBI.

Clinton said in March 2015 that she would turn over all work-related emails to the State Department after removing private messages that contained personal and family material. "No one wants their personal emails made public and I think most people understand that and respect their privacy," she said after her exclusive use of private emails to conduct State Department business was confirmed by media reports.

Senate investigators have asked for numerous emails about Clinton's server as part of their own inquiry into Clinton's email practices in recent months, but they didn't get copies of key messages made public by the State Department's own watchdog this week, a senior Republican senator said Thursday.

"It is disturbing that the State Department knew it had emails like this and turned them over to the inspector general, but not to Congress," said Iowa Sen. Charles Grassley, the chair of the Senate judiciary committee that's been probing Clinton's use of a private server.

The emails appear to contain work-related passages, raising questions about why they were not turned over to the State Department last year. The inspector general noted that Clinton's production of work-related emails was "incomplete," missing not only the three emails but numerous others covering Clinton's first four months in office.

The inspector general also found Clinton's email set up violated agency policies and could have left sensitive government information vulnerable. It also complicated federal archiving of her emails, in turn making it more difficult to obtain them under the Freedom of Information Act.

On Thursday, Clinton told ABC News her use of the personal email was "allowed," saying that "the rules have been clarified since I left." In a later interview Thursday with CNN, Clinton said she "believed it was allowed."

A spokesman for the Clinton campaign did not respond to emailed questions Thursday. An inspector general's spokesman declined to discuss the report.

The report said the inspector general was able to reconstruct some of Clinton's missing emails by searching the email files of four former Clinton aides who had turned over thousands of pages of communications in 2015 at the request of the State Department, which is defending itself in multiple public records lawsuits, including one filed by The Associated Press. The four aides who turned over those files, according to the report, were Clinton's former chief of staff, Cheryl Mills, and top aides Huma Abedin, Jake Sullivan and Philippe Reines.

Abedin was the aide who authored the key email in November 2010 that provoked Clinton's concerns about outsiders obtaining her personal emails. After the State Department's computer spam filters apparently prevented Clinton from sending a message to all department employees from her private server, Abedin suggested that she either open an official agency email or make her private address available to the agency.

Clinton told Abedin she was open to getting a separate email address but didn't want "any risk of the personal being accessible." Clinton never used an official State Department address, only using several private addresses to communicate. Abedin, Mills, Sullivan and Reines all also used private email addresses to conduct business, along with their government accounts.

Two other emails sent to Abedin were cited in the inspector general's report, but also did not turn up among the emails released by Clinton. Those messages to Abedin contained warnings in January 2011 from an unidentified aide to former President Bill Clinton who said he had to shut down Hillary Clinton's New York-based server because of suspected hacking attacks.

In response, Abedin warned Mills and Sullivan not to email Clinton "anything sensitive" and said she would "explain more in person."

___

Follow on Twitter: Jack Gillum at https://twitter.com/jackgillum and Chad Day at https://twitter.com/chadsday

]]>
China's Zoomlion drops bid for US crane maker Terex http://www.dailyastorian.com/chinas-zoomlion-drops-bid-for-us-crane-maker-terex-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world446dd1eb5c834431ac977abe9590c1e2 http://www.dailyastorian.com/chinas-zoomlion-drops-bid-for-us-crane-maker-terex-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world446dd1eb5c834431ac977abe9590c1e2#Comments Fri, 27 May 2016 00:21:27 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016305279898 HONG KONG (AP) — Chinese heavy equipment maker Zoomlion says it's abandoning its takeover bid for U.S. crane maker Terex because it failed to reach a deal after months of talks.

Zoomlion, which made its unsolicited offer in late January, said in a filing Friday to the Hong Kong stock exchange that "no agreement can be made on the crucial terms" so it decided to "terminate" its offer.

The company added that both sides had made "joint efforts to closely negotiate" on the proposal that valued Terex at $3.3 billion.

The announcement comes days after Westport, Connecticut-based Terex said it was pulling out of a proposed merger with Konecranes.

Instead, Terex will sell its cranes business to the Finnish company for $1.3 billion in cash and stock.

]]>
The Latest: Obama: Hiroshima visit honors all lost in WWII http://www.dailyastorian.com/the-latest-obama-hiroshima-visit-honors-all-lost-in-wwii-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world5ec39f3605d24c3fb842da7103e104c5 http://www.dailyastorian.com/the-latest-obama-hiroshima-visit-honors-all-lost-in-wwii-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world5ec39f3605d24c3fb842da7103e104c5#Comments Fri, 27 May 2016 00:30:26 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016305279900 HIROSHIMA, Japan (AP) — The Latest on U.S. President Barack Obama's visit to Hiroshima, Japan (all times local):

4:15 p.m.

President Barack Obama says his visit to Hiroshima will be an opportunity to honor the memory of all those lost during World War II.

Obama is visiting U.S. and Japanese troops at Iwakuni air station just before traveling to nearby Hiroshima for the first visit by a sitting U.S. president. He says his historic visit is a chance to reaffirm a commitment to pursuing a world where nuclear weapons are no longer necessary.

The president says his visit is a testament to how even the most painful divides can be bridged. He says it shows how former adversaries Japan and the U.S. can become not just partners but the best of friends and strongest of allies.

Obama is also praising the troops for their sacrifices to ensure the security of people around the world. He says the world mustn't forget to honor those who have given everything for freedom.

___

3:30 p.m.:

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (shin-zoh ah-bay) says President Barack Obama's visit to Hiroshima will give a "big boost" to efforts to achieve a nuclear-free world.

Abe says what happened in Hiroshima should never be repeated.

Some 140,000 people were killed in Hiroshima near the end of World War II when the U.S. dropped at atomic bomb on the western Japanese city.

It was the first such attack anywhere in the world.

Obama will become the first sitting U.S. president to visit Hiroshima's hallowed ground on Friday.

Abe commented at the conclusion of a summit of world leaders in Shima, Japan.

___

12:30 p.m.

Hiroshima's peace memorial park is being cleared of visitors in preparation for President Barack Obama's visit.

But there were plenty of morning visitors to the park, and all had their own reasons for coming.

Kinuyo Ikegami, who is 82, came to light incense and chant a prayer.

Long lines of schoolchildren took turns bowing and praying beside her.

Retiree Tsuguo Yoshikawa took a walk in the park, and said it's time for the U.S. and Japanese people to move forward without grudges.

Tokyo actor Kanji Shimizu says he wishes a U.S. president could have come earlier. But he's glad that the time has come. He's hoping Obama's visit will help promote world peace.

___

9 a.m.

President Barack Obama on Friday will become the first American president to confront the historic and haunted ground of Hiroshima.

At a place of great suffering, where U.S. forces dropped the atomic bomb that gave birth to the nuclear age, Obama will pay tribute to the 140,000 people who died from the attack seven decades ago.

He will not apologize. He will not second-guess President Harry Truman's decision to unleash the awful power of nuclear weapons. He will not dissect Japanese aggression in World War II.

Rather, Obama aimed to offer a simple reflection, acknowledging the devastating toll of war and coupling it with a message that the world can — and must — do better.

]]>
Spike in crime in Las Vegas spurs search for causes, cures http://www.dailyastorian.com/spike-in-crime-in-las-vegas-spurs-search-for-causes-cures-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worldb7c36c2960754ca99b23c54fe5a09d33 http://www.dailyastorian.com/spike-in-crime-in-las-vegas-spurs-search-for-causes-cures-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worldb7c36c2960754ca99b23c54fe5a09d33#Comments Fri, 27 May 2016 00:32:00 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016305279901 LAS VEGAS (AP) — From shootings on the Strip to the killing of a liquor store clerk who couldn't open a safe to an April weekend that saw five slayings in separate cases, crime is spiking in the shadows in Las Vegas — and spurring questions about causes and cures.

The local sheriff, police union officials and district attorney have various theories about what's behind the body count: 64 homicides by the end of April, compared with 29 killings after the first four months of 2015; 75 slayings as of Wednesday, compared with 45 by the same date last year.

They cite officer staffing levels; gang activity; jail release policies locally and in neighboring California; and a departmental reorganization after Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo was elected 18 months ago.

"That's the million-dollar question," DA Steve Wolfson said. "There are lots of theories."

Lombardo defends his deployment decisions, and concedes that pointing the finger at California jails and criminals is based more on what he calls a gut reaction than on statistics.

"Everybody's dealing with an increase in violent crime across the nation," Lombardo said. "The question is whether we're dealing with it more here than anybody else."

In Washington, D.C., FBI Director James Comey cited Las Vegas and Chicago as examples of a rise in violence nationally. He said he'd been briefed about crime rates in more than 40 cities, but he named just two.

"From the Las Vegas Strip you can't tell that more than 60 people have been murdered in Las Vegas this year," Comey recently told reporters in the nation's capital.

Lombardo, a 25-year Las Vegas police veteran, heads a department with 2,612 sworn police officers covering a city and most of a county with more than 2 million residents, plus more than 40 million visitors a year.

"Officers' presence makes a difference," Lombardo said. "All the resources we can, within reason, we bring forward to attack violent crime."

But the image of the safety in Sin City has been shaken several times in recent months:

— A motorist plowed through a crowd of Las Vegas Strip pedestrians in December, killing one and injuring at least 34 others from seven states, Mexico and Canada.

— Two bystanders were grazed by police gunfire in a January shooting during an evening musical fountain show at the Bellagio resort. The officer was firing at a man with a handgun, who wasn't hit.

— A shooting in February killed two San Francisco Bay-area women and left a man wounded in a car after a fistfight in a Strip resort parking lot.

— A brazen takeover robbery at a warehouse-style liquor store stunned the city in April. Security video showed three assailants entering the store, and cameras recorded the shooting death of a 24-year-old clerk who police said didn't have the combination to open the safe.

The headlines have prompted second-guessing amid the police rank-and-file — including some who think dispersing gang detectives from a central office to the department's eight regional commands was a bad idea.

"We didn't get more bodies. We moved people around," said Mark Chaparian, executive director of the local police union. "When homicide numbers have doubled and violent crime is up, everyone looks at what happened and asks, 'What went wrong?'"

John Faulis, a lieutenant who heads the police supervisors' union, agrees with Lombardo that Las Vegas police are understaffed. Department figures put the number of police officers in Las Vegas at 1.7 per 1,000 residents.

The number is just under the 1.8 officers per 1,000 residents average for large cities in the West, according to FBI data, but below the average of 2.2 per 1,000 for similar-sized cities nationally. The ratio doesn't count people staying in Las Vegas' 150,000 hotel rooms.

Lombardo, who looks to cities like Los Angeles, San Diego and Phoenix as models, said he believes half the homicides this year in Las Vegas have been associated with gangs. Police estimate that Las Vegas has 15,000 gang members.

Los Angeles also is seeing a spike in crime this year compared with 2015, said Kevin McCarthy, detective commander of a department with nearly 10,000 sworn police officers in a city of 4 million people — a ratio of 4 per 1,000. McCarthy said violent crime was up 16 percent and homicides were up 16.5 percent.

In Phoenix, a city of 1.5 million people, homicides are up one-third this year, from 33 in the first four months of 2015 to 49 this year. The police department has a ratio of 2.1 officers per 1,000 residents.

San Diego, a city of 1.4 million, appears to be an exception, with violent crime down 12 percent in the first three months of 2016, compared with 2015. It has 1.5 police officers per 1,000 residents.

Elected officials in Las Vegas balked several times in recent years at proposals to hike the local sales tax to hire more officers before voting in September to increase the sales tax from 8.1 percent to 8.15 percent.

"Do we need more cops? Obviously," said Steve Sisolak, chairman of the seven-member Clark County Commission, the elected body with oversight of the Las Vegas Strip. "But how do you pay for them?"

     ]]>