The Daily Astorian | http://www.dailyastorian.com The Daily Astorian Mon, 20 Apr 2015 21:53:25 -0400 en http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/staticimage/images/rss-logo.jpg The Daily Astorian | http://www.dailyastorian.com AP Top U.S. News At Midnight EDT http://www.dailyastorian.com/ap-top-us-news-at-midnight-edt-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worldfe26e82c9bc84f62a0704dcbfce1949b http://www.dailyastorian.com/ap-top-us-news-at-midnight-edt-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worldfe26e82c9bc84f62a0704dcbfce1949b#Comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 21:00:23 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2015304209780 SC paper wins Pulitzer for reporting on domestic violenceClinton defends family foundation from charges of favoritismSheriff, lawyer dispute whether 73-year-old deputy qualifiedUtah woman gets up to life in prison in deaths of 6 newbornsMinnesota men charged with trying to join Islamic militantsSpokesman: Alabama woman left to join Islamic State groupBlue Bell Creameries issues recall of all productsWife of ex-Virginia governor: Corruption trial was unfair]]> Baltimore on edge after arrestee's fatal spine injury http://www.dailyastorian.com/baltimore-on-edge-after-arrestees-fatal-spine-injury-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worldcad15feb2d514a8fa9ffced943c861f0 http://www.dailyastorian.com/baltimore-on-edge-after-arrestees-fatal-spine-injury-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worldcad15feb2d514a8fa9ffced943c861f0#Comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 21:00:34 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2015304209779 BALTIMORE (AP) Baltimore's top police officials, mayor and prosecutor sought to calm a "community on edge" Monday while investigating how a man suffered a fatal spine injury while under arrest. Six officers have been suspended, but investigators say they still don't know how it happened.

A week after Freddie Gray was pulled off the street and into a police van, authorities don't have any videos or other evidence explaining what happened to cause the "medical emergency" an arresting officer said Gray suffered while being taken to the local police station, Deputy Commissioner Jerry Rodriguez said.

The Gray family's lawyer, Billy Murphy, had said that Gray's "spine was 80 percent severed at his neck."

Autopsy results returned Monday show that Gray "did suffer a significant spinal injury that led to his death," Rodriguez said. "What we don't know is how he suffered that injury."

Police also released a more detailed timeline of how Gray was arrested and transported on April 12. It revealed that Gray was placed in leg irons after an officer felt he was becoming "irate," and that the van stopped on its way to the police station, even picking up another prisoner in an unrelated case, while Gray repeatedly asked for medical attention.

Police Commissioner Anthony Batts said that Gray asked first for an inhaler, and then several times during his transport for medical care.

"There were several times he made a medical request," Batts said. "He asked for an inhaler, and at one or two of the stops it was noticed that he was having trouble breathing and we probably should have asked for paramedics."

Something must have happened between the time Gray was videotaped by a bystander being dragged into the van, and the time he arrived at the station in deep distress, the deputy commissioner said.

"When Mr. Gray was put in that van, he could talk, he was upset. And when he was taken out of that van, he could not talk and he could not breathe," Rodriguez said.

Batts also said it is still unclear why Gray was stopped in the first place, saying only that officers "made eye contact" with Gray and another man, and the two took off running.

"That's part of the question we have to dig into," Batts said, "if there's more than just running. There is no law against running."

Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said she too is "angry that we are here again" after trying to overcome decades of distrust between police and citizens in Baltimore's inner city.

"Our community is experiencing a great deal of trauma," Rawlings-Blake said. "This is a very, very tense time for Baltimore City."

Batts said he is ordering that police review and rewrite "effective immediately" its policies on moving prisoners and providing them with medical attention.

"We are a community on edge right now. We hear, I hear, the outrage. I hear the concern and I hear the fear," Batts said, asking for calm. "We are on edge as a city, and I need your help to make sure we get this out in the proper way."

But Billy Murphy, an attorney representing Gray's family, said Monday that the news conference left him with more questions than answers.

"They were vague about how his spine was injured. We'll have to wait to see the autopsy that they admitted they worked closely with the medical examiner's office to develop," Murphy said. "So tell us what it says. I have even more questions than I did before. Who did it? How did they do it and why did they do it? Why all these stops? What were the police doing during those stops? What did they see?"

All six officers involved have been suspended, said Rodriguez, who is in charge of the department's professional standards and accountability.

Officer Garrett Miller's official request for a criminal charge against Gray, a 25-year-old black man who was only 5-foot-8 inches tall and 145 pounds, said that he had been arrested "without force or incident."

Miller sought a charge of carrying a switchblade, punishable by a year in prison and a $500 fine, according to court records obtained Monday by The Associated Press.

Miller's charging document doesn't provide any explanations for the injuries that would lead to Gray's death a week later. He wrote only that while being taken to the station, on April 12, "the defendant suffered a medical emergency and was immediately transported to Shock Trauma via medic."

Another 30 minutes passed before police finally called an ambulance to pick Gray up at the station. He arrived at the hospital in critical condition and died on Sunday after a weeklong coma.

The documents, which misspell Gray's name as "Grey," were first reported Monday by The Baltimore Sun. Police had not previously mentioned a knife, or publicly disclosed the charge against Gray.

Miller's signed report says he personally recovered the knife from Gray's pocket. It names five other officers to be summoned as witnesses in court, and says Gray was stopped after a brief foot chase because he "fled unprovoked upon noticing police presence."

"We have no confidence that the city or the police department is going to fairly and objectively investigate this case," Murphy said.

Activists protesting excessive use of force and even Baltimore city officials say they have more questions than answers. About 50 people marched from City Hall to police headquarters Monday, carrying signs reading "Black lives matter" and "Jobs, not police killings." They unfurled a yellow banner reading "Stop police terror."

"This is just one of the most egregious cases I've ever seen," said Colleen Davidson of the Baltimore People's Power Assembly, which she said organized the rally at the request of Gray's family. "We felt the need to be out here and make it known that we will not stand and watch things like this happen."

Rodriguez said his investigators will hand everything they find over to the office of State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby by May 1. She too appealed Monday for anyone with information to contact her office.

"I can assure the public that my office has dedicated all its existing resources to independently investigate this matter to determine whether criminal charges will be brought," Mosby said.

___

Associated Press Writer David Dishneau contributed to this report.

    ]]>
CA Lottery http://www.dailyastorian.com/ca-lottery-da-ap-webfeeds-news-northwestfb5b526d2ad04ace9869c539480ada67 http://www.dailyastorian.com/ca-lottery-da-ap-webfeeds-news-northwestfb5b526d2ad04ace9869c539480ada67#Comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 20:00:11 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2015304209991 Daily 3 Midday

0-4-4

(zero, four, four)

Daily 4

7-9-5-4

(seven, nine, five, four)

Daily Derby

1st:2 Lucky Star-2nd:3 Hot Shot-3rd:11 Money Bags, Race Time: 1:42.22

(1st: 2 Lucky Star, 2nd: 3 Hot Shot, 3rd: 11 Money Bags; Race Time: one: 42.22)

Estimated jackpot: $188,000

Fantasy 5

05-17-20-24-29

(five, seventeen, twenty, twenty-four, twenty-nine)

Estimated jackpot: $102,000

Mega Millions

Estimated jackpot: $65 million

Powerball

Estimated jackpot: $40 million

]]>
Agency proposes lifting protections for most humpback whales http://www.dailyastorian.com/agency-proposes-lifting-protections-for-most-humpback-whales-da-ap-webfeeds-news-northwest1e271b266f604347ad5d017f7913c759 http://www.dailyastorian.com/agency-proposes-lifting-protections-for-most-humpback-whales-da-ap-webfeeds-news-northwest1e271b266f604347ad5d017f7913c759#Comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 19:00:16 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2015304209854 HONOLULU (AP) The federal government on Monday proposed removing most of the world's humpback whales from the endangered species list, saying the massive mammals have rebounded after 45 years of protection and restoration efforts.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries officials want to reclassify humpbacks into 14 distinct populations, and remove 10 of those from the list. The last time the agency delisted a species due to recovery was more than two decades ago.

Approval of the proposal would not mean there will be an open hunting season on humpbacks.

All the whales remain protected under the Marine Mammals Protection Act, and the United States is still an active member of the International Whaling Commission, which banned commercial whaling in 1966, said Angela Somma, chief of NOAA Fisheries endangered species division.

According to the International Whaling Commission's website, there are only a few places in the world that still allow hunting of humpback whales, and that is for aboriginal subsistence only. Three nations, Japan, Norway and Iceland, still allow the animals to be killed for scientific research.

Humans hunted the whales in much higher numbers before their listing as endangered. Humpbacks were listed as endangered in 1970, four years after the International Whaling Commission banned commercial humpback whaling. The commission put a stop to all commercial whaling in 1986.

Humpbacks are found around the world, and officials say protection and restoration efforts have increased their numbers in many areas. Among those recommended for delisting is the population that migrates each year from Hawaii to Alaska.

NOAA officials said decisions on which whale groups to recommend were based on many factors, including the risks they face. The single largest threat to humpbacks is fishing activities that result in the whales becoming tangled in fishing gear and drowning.

Donna Weiting, NOAA's director for the Office of Protected Resources, said the most important considerations in determining if populations will remain on the list are their size and growth rates.

"Ten of these populations are no longer in danger of extinction, which is our criteria for an endangered listing, nor are they likely to become so in the foreseeable future, our criteria for a threatened status," she said.

Under the latest plan, two of the humpback populations would be listed as threatened, in Central America and the Western North Pacific. The agency said these whales at times enter U.S. waters.

The other two populations in the Arabian Sea and off Cape Verde and northwest Africa would remain listed as endangered.

Marta Nammack, NOAA Fisheries' national Endangered Species Act listing coordinator, estimates the global population of humpback whales at around 90,000.

Humpbacks were placed on the endangered list in 1970. No data exists on their population then, but Nammack said their numbers were "severely depleted."

Some populations are growing at a rate of up to 11 percent annually since the listing, which requires federal approval for federally funded or authorized activities that could harm whales or their habitat.

Last year, the state of Alaska filed a petition to remove some North Pacific humpback whales from protection under the Endangered Species Act. That population, estimated at more than 10,000, feeds in Alaska in the summer and breeds in Hawaii in winter.

Rebecca Noblin, Alaska director for the Center for Biological Diversity, said it's a good sign the whales are being considered for removal from the list, but it might be premature.

Whales continue to be vulnerable to factors including climate change and ocean acidification, which affects their prey stock, she said.

"It would really be beneficial to continue to have the protections of the Endangered Species Act as the oceans change," she said.

The last time NOAA removed a species from the endangered list due its recovery was in 1994, when it delisted the eastern North Pacific population of gray whales.

Humpbacks weigh 25 to 40 tons and can grow up to 60 feet long. They are primarily dark gray with some white spots, and their pectoral fins can grow as long as 15 feet, according to NOAA's website.

The public has 90 days to comment on the recommended changes.

___

Follow Caleb Jones on Twitter: @CalebAP

     ]]>
Winning numbers drawn in '10 Spot Evening' game http://www.dailyastorian.com/winning-numbers-drawn-in-10-spot-evening-game-da-ap-webfeeds-news-northwestd83f171fdb2b48a7bba5eeb6073906e3 http://www.dailyastorian.com/winning-numbers-drawn-in-10-spot-evening-game-da-ap-webfeeds-news-northwestd83f171fdb2b48a7bba5eeb6073906e3#Comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 19:00:19 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2015304209995 HELENA, Mont. (AP) The winning numbers in Monday evening's drawing of the Montana Lottery's "10 Spot Evening" game were:

02-11-18-36-38-41-42-51-56-57-59-61-64-68-72-73-74-75-76-80

(two, eleven, eighteen, thirty-six, thirty-eight, forty-one, forty-two, fifty-one, fifty-six, fifty-seven, fifty-nine, sixty-one, sixty-four, sixty-eight, seventy-two, seventy-three, seventy-four, seventy-five, seventy-six, eighty)

Top Prize of $25,000 by matching ten of the twenty numbers drawn.

]]>
Minnesota men charged with trying to join Islamic militants http://www.dailyastorian.com/minnesota-men-charged-with-trying-to-join-islamic-militants-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world422222dc3ebe40be9b4a9e1301fc5a54 http://www.dailyastorian.com/minnesota-men-charged-with-trying-to-join-islamic-militants-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world422222dc3ebe40be9b4a9e1301fc5a54#Comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 21:01:38 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2015304209966 ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) When Guled Ali Omar made up his mind to join the Islamic State group, authorities said, he wasn't easily deterred.

The Minnesota man emptied his bank accounts last May and planned to fly to Syria via San Diego, federal officials say, but his family confronted him and he set his plans aside. In November, officials say, he tried to board a flight in Minneapolis, but was stopped by the FBI.

Even while under investigation, authorities say, Omar and five other men kept trying to make their way to Syria, coming up with a plot to secure false passports.

Omar is among six Minnesota men of Somali descent charged with terrorism-related offenses in a criminal complaint unsealed Monday. They are the latest Westerners accused of traveling or attempting to travel to Syria to join the Islamic State group, which has carried out a host of attacks including beheading Americans.

Authorities described the men as friends in Minnesota's Somali community who recruited and inspired each other and met secretly to plan their travels. They are charged with conspiracy to provide material support and attempting to provide material support to a foreign terrorist organization.

"What is remarkable about this case is that nothing stopped these defendants from pursuing their goal," U.S. Attorney for Minnesota Andy Luger said Monday. "They never stopped plotting another way to get to Syria to join ISIL."

The Minneapolis area is home to the largest concentration of Somali immigrants in the U.S. Since 2007, more than 22 young Somali men have also traveled from Minnesota to Somalia to join the militant group al-Shabab, which is also listed by the U.S. State Department as fomenting terrorism. Authorities have said a handful of Minnesota residents have traveled to Syria to fight with militants in the past year, and at least one has died.

Al-Shabab gunmen carried out an attack on a university in Kenya on April 2 that left 148 people dead, most of them university students.

The Minnesota men charged on Monday were identified as Omar, 20; brothers Mohamed Abdihamid Farah, 21, and Adnan Abdihamid Farah, 19; Abdurahman Yasin Daud, 21; Zacharia Yusuf Abdurahman, 19; and Hanad Mustafe Musse, 19.

All six are of Somali descent. Daud is a permanent resident, and Guled is a naturalized citizen. The others were born in the U.S.

Luger said that in this case, there was no "master recruiter" in Minnesota's Somali community, but rather this group of family and friends engaged in "peer-to-peer" recruiting. They also helped each other with funding taking money out of their own accounts or, in one case, trying to sell a car.

They had help from Abdi Nur, another friend who was successful in getting to Syria last May and had become a "de facto foreign fighter recruiter for those in Minnesota," Luger said.

"What this case shows is that the person radicalizing your son, your brother, your friend, may not be a stranger," Luger said. "It may be their best friend, right here in town."

He said Nur, who was charged late last year, had regular contact with the men in the group and served as a source of inspiration for those who wanted to follow his path.

All six were arrested Sunday. Adnan Farah, Abdurahman, Musse and Omar were arrested in Minneapolis. They entered no plea, as is standard, during an initial court appearance Monday and were ordered held pending detention hearings Thursday.

Mohamed Farah and Daud were arrested Sunday in San Diego and appeared in court there. They were also ordered held pending hearings Friday and are expected to be returned to Minnesota to face charges.

Minneapolis FBI Special Agent in Charge Richard Thornton said the pair had gone to San Diego to pick up fraudulent travel documents with the intent of going to Mexico, then on to Syria.

An FBI affidavit says they traveled with another man who was cooperating with authorities. Luger said this man was once part of the conspiracy but changed his mind and began recording conversations.

Longtime community activist Omar Jamal, who is working with families, said many Somali community members believe the young men were entrapped.

Abdihamid Farah Yusuf, the father of brothers Adnan Farah and Mohamed Farah, said he doesn't believe his sons did what authorities allege.

Guled Omar's older brother, Ahmed Ali Omar, was among those who joined al-Shabab, leaving Minnesota in December 2007, according to the FBI affidavit. Ahmed Omar remains a fugitive. The court documents also say when agents went to Omar's house in November, another brother, Mohamed Ali Omar, threatened them. Mohamed Omar was convicted.

An FBI affidavit says Guled Omar had also tried to go to Somalia in 2012 to join al-Shabab.

Three of these newest defendants Mohamed Farah, Abdurahman and Musse were stopped at a New York City airport in November along with 19-year-old Hamza Ahmed, but they were not charged until now.

Ahmed was indicted on charges of lying to the FBI during a terrorism investigation, conspiring to provide material support to IS, and attempting to provide material support. He has pleaded not guilty.

Mohamud Noor, executive director of the Confederation of Somali Community in Minnesota, said he is saddened by the arrests. He said one of the young men came to him and asked for help, and Noor didn't have the resources to intervene before it was too late.

___

Follow Amy Forliti on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/amyforliti

    ]]>
Raptors Lou Williams wins NBA Sixth Man Award http://www.dailyastorian.com/raptors-lou-williams-wins-nba-sixth-man-award-da-ap-webfeeds-news-pro-sports5a51f7a8880b413284ddc5ebf828937e http://www.dailyastorian.com/raptors-lou-williams-wins-nba-sixth-man-award-da-ap-webfeeds-news-pro-sports5a51f7a8880b413284ddc5ebf828937e#Comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 18:01:46 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2015304209844 TORONTO (AP) What started as a song has become reality for Raptors guard Lou Williams.

Williams won the NBA Sixth Man Award on Monday, honored as the league's best reserve after averaging a career-best 15.5 points in his 10th season and helping Toronto win a franchise-record 49 games.

"It couldn't happen at a better time for me," Williams said as he picked up the award in a ceremony at a downtown hotel with several teammates, his mother, brother, two daughters and his former high school coach watching. "Everything is right in the world."

Williams was mentioned in the lyrics of the song "6 Man" by Toronto rapper Drake, who is also the Raptors' global ambassador. The song came out in February, right around the NBA's All-Star weekend.

"Drake got it right," Raptors forward Patrick Patterson said. "He made the song for a reason. He predicted the future."

Williams, who also appeared in the song's video, called the experience "cool."

"I have a soundtrack to go with the award," he said.

What did Drake give him for his efforts?

"I got like 100,000 Instagram followers," Williams said, laughing.

The first Raptor to win the award, Williams received 78 first-place votes and 502 points from a panel of 130 sports writers and broadcasters throughout the U.S. and Canada. Isaiah Thomas of the Boston Celtics finished second with 324 points (33 first-place votes). Two-time winner Jamal Crawford of the Los Angeles Clippers was third with 131 points (eight first-place votes).

Teammate DeMar DeRozan praised Williams for the spark he gave Toronto's offense.

"He's a lethal dude to have coming off the bench" DeRozan said. "He'll affect the game so much by getting to the free throw line, drawing fouls, getting teams in the penalty and running off 12 or 13 points in eight minutes."

Williams came off the bench in all 80 of his appearances and averaged 25.2 minutes. He led or tied for the team lead in scoring 18 times, second-most in the league for a reserve. The Raptors went 14-4 in those games.

"Without him, we'd have been in trouble," Raptors coach Dwane Casey said.

For Williams, the award is especially meaningful because it proves he has put two injury-plagued seasons behind him.

"Today is a special day just to commemorate everything I've been through," he said.

It's a day Williams wasn't sure he'd ever see after tearing a ligament in his right knee in January 2013 while playing for Atlanta.

"That was the closest I felt to retirement," Williams said. "It's scary."

While his knee now feels stronger than ever, the injury robbed Williams of much of his explosiveness.

"I can't jump and I can't run," he laughed. "Those are two very important things in basketball."

Fortunately, he can still shoot. Williams led the Raptors in free throw percentage (86.1) and made a career-high 152 3-pointers. He said 3-point shooting was something he worked on last summer as he struggled to overcome the injury, "knowing that I wasn't going to be able to beat guys off the dribble as I once was."

Raptors general manager Masai Ujiri called Williams "a spectacular player."

"He's done far and beyond what we expected," Ujiri said.

"Nobody kind of knew what he was going to bring to the table," Casey said, "whether he was damaged goods or whatever. He's proved to everybody that he's the old Lou Williams."

Acquired from the Hawks along with backup center Lucas Nogueria for John Salmons and a second-round draft pick, Williams becomes a free agent this summer but said he's comfortable in Toronto.

"In my 10-year career, I've never been over to my different teammates' homes as much as I have with this group," he said. "We sit around, we watch games, we break down games, we talk about our team. Just the camaraderie and the bond that these guys have is completely different than I've experienced on other teams."

]]>
Doerr, Guirgis among Pulitzer winners in arts http://www.dailyastorian.com/doerr-guirgis-among-pulitzer-winners-in-arts-da-ap-webfeeds-news-entertainmentd75adc52d223421ab9710c9b91348982 http://www.dailyastorian.com/doerr-guirgis-among-pulitzer-winners-in-arts-da-ap-webfeeds-news-entertainmentd75adc52d223421ab9710c9b91348982#Comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 18:02:21 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2015304209819 NEW YORK (AP) Anthony Doerr's "All the Light We Cannot See," an emotional and intimate World War II novel that has been one of the top-selling literary works of the past year, has won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction.

Pulitzer judges on Monday cited Doerr's "short, elegant chapters that explore human nature and the contradictory power of technology." Doerr's book alternates between a blind French girl and young Nazi soldier, with radio a means of resistance and propaganda.

Doerr, fittingly, was in Paris when the award was announced. A resident of Boise, Idaho, Doerr needed more than a decade to complete "All the Light We Cannot See," more time than the war itself. He told The Associated Press that there were days when he thought he "would never finish the book," which has been on best-seller lists for months, and was especially surprised by his Pulitzer since the story "contains no Americans."

The $10,000 prize is given "for distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life."

"Obviously, it's wonderful," the 41-year-old Doerr said of the Pulitzer, adding that he was enjoying ice cream with his family when his editor called to share the news.

Fiction finalists included previous Richard Ford for "Let Me Be Frank with You," post-Hurricane Sandy stories featuring his longtime protagonist Frank Bascombe, the main character of his 1996 Pulitzer recipient "Independence Day."

Also Monday, Stephen Adly Guirgis's "Between Riverside and Crazy" won the Pulitzer Prize for drama, with judges hailing the New York playwright for using "dark comedy to confront questions of life and death." The play tells of a cantankerous ex-cop who owns a piece of real estate on the Upper West Side and makes it a refuge for the hard-luck orphans who have become his surrogate family.

Guirgis, who has been a member of the off-Broadway LAByrinth Theatre Company since 1994, had a critical hit on Broadway in 2011 with the searing recovery story "The Motherf---- With the Hat," starring Chris Rock.

His other plays include "Jesus Hopped the 'A' Train," ''Our Lady of 121st Street," ''In Arabia We'd All Be Kings" and "The Last Days of Judas Iscariot."

"He never forgets about the people that much of society has left behind. I feel like he has a belief in real people and their ability for redemption," said Neil Pepe, the artistic director of Atlantic Theater Company, where "Between Riverside and Crazy" made its world premiere starring Stephen McKinley Henderson.

The Pulitzer for general nonfiction went to "The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History," by Elizabeth Kolbert, whose work was praised by judges as "an exploration of nature that forces readers to consider the threat posed by human behavior to a world of astonishing diversity."

Kolbert, a staff writer for The New Yorker, was working on an article for the magazine in a small town in Bavaria when she got the news.

"I'm one of those people who didn't even know the Pulitzers were being announced today," she said. "But I heard my email going ding ding ding and I knew something was up."

Kolbert said she'd worked for four and a half years on the best-seller, and attributed its success in part to some famous supporters: Jon Stewart, who highlighted the book on "The Daily Show" and former vice president and leading environmentalist Al Gore, who recommended "The Sixth Extinction" in a New York Times review. "That was huge," she said.

David I. Kertzer's "The Pope and Mussolini: The Secret History of Pius XI and the Rise of Fascism in Europe" won for biography-autobiography, and "Encounters at the Heart of the World: A History of the Mandan People " by Elizabeth A. Fenn, won for history.

Kertzer, a professor of social science, anthropology and Italian studies at Brown University, has written often about Italy and about church and state. He felt compelled to write "The Pope and Mussolini" after the Vatican opened its archives more than a decade ago.

"They really allowed for new perspectives," Kertzer said of the archives. "And the Fascist archives are incredibly juicy, not least because Mussolini had his famous surveillance system."

Fenn's book profiles the Mandans, who live in what today is North Dakota, and among whom the Lewis and Clarke expedition camped in its first winter of 1804-1805. The Mandan people numbered about 15,000 in the year 1500, Fenn said; her work profiles them through a terrible small pox epidemic in 1837-38 and up to 1845.

"My pitch is that stories like this need to be a part of the early American canon," Fenn said. "We need to think of early America as far bigger and more interesting than the 13 English colonies, or the Russian colonies, the Spanish colonies and the French colonies."

The poetry prize was given to Gregory Pardlo's "Digest" and Julia Wolfe's "Anthracite Fields" won for music.

Pardlo, a resident of Brooklyn and associate editor for the literary journal Callaloo, drew upon his "loving, but complex" relationship with his father as an inspiration for "Digest."

Pardlo, 46, said that the book was a process that "took a lot out of me. I was feeling frustrated with my work, and this book was a Hail Mary. I took some risks. It was scary for me to face some of my demons."

Wolfe's work, described by judges as a "powerful oratorio for chorus and sextet," was composed after a year's study of the Pennsylvania coal mining industry at the turn of the 20th Century, near where Wolfe grew up in Montgomeryville, Pennsylvania.

"I'm definitely shell-shocked," Wolfe, 56, said from her home in New York City. She describes herself as a musical renegade, with inspirations that come from folks, classical and rock, and said she hopes the award can inspire other musicians to follow dreams that follow unconventional paths.

____

Associated Press reporters David Bauder, Mark Kennedy and Jocelyn Noveck contributed to this report.

    ]]>
Doerr, Guirgis among Pulitzer winners in arts http://www.dailyastorian.com/doerr-guirgis-among-pulitzer-winners-in-arts-da-ap-webfeeds-news-northwestd75adc52d223421ab9710c9b91348982 http://www.dailyastorian.com/doerr-guirgis-among-pulitzer-winners-in-arts-da-ap-webfeeds-news-northwestd75adc52d223421ab9710c9b91348982#Comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 18:00:34 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2015304209827 NEW YORK (AP) Anthony Doerr's "All the Light We Cannot See," an emotional and intimate World War II novel that has been one of the top-selling literary works of the past year, has won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction.

Pulitzer judges on Monday cited Doerr's "short, elegant chapters that explore human nature and the contradictory power of technology." Doerr's book alternates between a blind French girl and young Nazi soldier, with radio a means of resistance and propaganda.

Doerr, fittingly, was in Paris when the award was announced. A resident of Boise, Idaho, Doerr needed more than a decade to complete "All the Light We Cannot See," more time than the war itself. He told The Associated Press that there were days when he thought he "would never finish the book," which has been on best-seller lists for months, and was especially surprised by his Pulitzer since the story "contains no Americans."

The $10,000 prize is given "for distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life."

"Obviously, it's wonderful," the 41-year-old Doerr said of the Pulitzer, adding that he was enjoying ice cream with his family when his editor called to share the news.

Fiction finalists included previous Richard Ford for "Let Me Be Frank with You," post-Hurricane Sandy stories featuring his longtime protagonist Frank Bascombe, the main character of his 1996 Pulitzer recipient "Independence Day."

Also Monday, Stephen Adly Guirgis's "Between Riverside and Crazy" won the Pulitzer Prize for drama, with judges hailing the New York playwright for using "dark comedy to confront questions of life and death." The play tells of a cantankerous ex-cop who owns a piece of real estate on the Upper West Side and makes it a refuge for the hard-luck orphans who have become his surrogate family.

Guirgis, who has been a member of the off-Broadway LAByrinth Theatre Company since 1994, had a critical hit on Broadway in 2011 with the searing recovery story "The Motherf---- With the Hat," starring Chris Rock.

His other plays include "Jesus Hopped the 'A' Train," ''Our Lady of 121st Street," ''In Arabia We'd All Be Kings" and "The Last Days of Judas Iscariot."

"He never forgets about the people that much of society has left behind. I feel like he has a belief in real people and their ability for redemption," said Neil Pepe, the artistic director of Atlantic Theater Company, where "Between Riverside and Crazy" made its world premiere starring Stephen McKinley Henderson.

The Pulitzer for general nonfiction went to "The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History," by Elizabeth Kolbert, whose work was praised by judges as "an exploration of nature that forces readers to consider the threat posed by human behavior to a world of astonishing diversity."

Kolbert, a staff writer for The New Yorker, was working on an article for the magazine in a small town in Bavaria when she got the news.

"I'm one of those people who didn't even know the Pulitzers were being announced today," she said. "But I heard my email going ding ding ding and I knew something was up."

Kolbert said she'd worked for four and a half years on the best-seller, and attributed its success in part to some famous supporters: Jon Stewart, who highlighted the book on "The Daily Show" and former vice president and leading environmentalist Al Gore, who recommended "The Sixth Extinction" in a New York Times review. "That was huge," she said.

David I. Kertzer's "The Pope and Mussolini: The Secret History of Pius XI and the Rise of Fascism in Europe" won for biography-autobiography, and "Encounters at the Heart of the World: A History of the Mandan People " by Elizabeth A. Fenn, won for history.

Kertzer, a professor of social science, anthropology and Italian studies at Brown University, has written often about Italy and about church and state. He felt compelled to write "The Pope and Mussolini" after the Vatican opened its archives more than a decade ago.

"They really allowed for new perspectives," Kertzer said of the archives. "And the Fascist archives are incredibly juicy, not least because Mussolini had his famous surveillance system."

Fenn's book profiles the Mandans, who live in what today is North Dakota, and among whom the Lewis and Clarke expedition camped in its first winter of 1804-1805. The Mandan people numbered about 15,000 in the year 1500, Fenn said; her work profiles them through a terrible small pox epidemic in 1837-38 and up to 1845.

"My pitch is that stories like this need to be a part of the early American canon," Fenn said. "We need to think of early America as far bigger and more interesting than the 13 English colonies, or the Russian colonies, the Spanish colonies and the French colonies."

The poetry prize was given to Gregory Pardlo's "Digest" and Julia Wolfe's "Anthracite Fields" won for music.

Pardlo, a resident of Brooklyn and associate editor for the literary journal Callaloo, drew upon his "loving, but complex" relationship with his father as an inspiration for "Digest."

Pardlo, 46, said that the book was a process that "took a lot out of me. I was feeling frustrated with my work, and this book was a Hail Mary. I took some risks. It was scary for me to face some of my demons."

Wolfe's work, described by judges as a "powerful oratorio for chorus and sextet," was composed after a year's study of the Pennsylvania coal mining industry at the turn of the 20th Century, near where Wolfe grew up in Montgomeryville, Pennsylvania.

"I'm definitely shell-shocked," Wolfe, 56, said from her home in New York City. She describes herself as a musical renegade, with inspirations that come from folks, classical and rock, and said she hopes the award can inspire other musicians to follow dreams that follow unconventional paths.

____

Associated Press reporters David Bauder, Mark Kennedy and Jocelyn Noveck contributed to this report.

    ]]>
Sheriff, lawyer dispute whether 73-year-old deputy qualified http://www.dailyastorian.com/sheriff-lawyer-dispute-whether-73-year-old-deputy-qualified-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world1b6a00a0a4374648b6080c3c9586c37b http://www.dailyastorian.com/sheriff-lawyer-dispute-whether-73-year-old-deputy-qualified-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world1b6a00a0a4374648b6080c3c9586c37b#Comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 21:01:14 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2015304209777 OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) The Tulsa County volunteer deputy who shot and killed a suspect after mistaking his handgun for a stun gun was using an unauthorized weapon when he fired the fatal shot, lawyers for the dead man's family said Monday.

In separate news conferences, the county sheriff and lawyers for the man killed by 73-year-old Robert Bates disagreed on whether the reserve officer should have been on the streets with a badge and a gun.

Sheriff Stanley Glanz said Bates, his longtime insurance agent, had been properly trained and passed annual firearms certifications required by the state.

Dan Smolen, a lawyer for Harris' family, said the Tulsa County Sheriff's Office violated a number of its internal policies by letting Bates carry his personal handgun after training at the range on another weapon. Smolen also said the department failed to keep a permanent record of Bates' training, a violation of local policies.

Records Bates released during the weekend showed that the volunteer officer was trained on a .45, not the weapon used in Harris' death.

"None of those that are approved by the sheriff's office own policies include a .357 Smith and Wesson," Smolen said, while reviewing department records for reporters.

"Firearms training is a critical piece of this story. None of the records produced by the Tulsa County Sheriff's Office or Mr. Bates' attorney, whoever produced them, indicate that he was ever certified with a .357 revolver," Smolen said.

Harris died after running from a sting operation involving illegal gun sales. Bates, who has been charged with second-degree manslaughter, has said that he confused his handgun with his stun gun following a short chase.

The sheriff said it was proper to have Bates on the scene with eight other officers during an investigation into illegal gun sales.

"Mr. Bates has been to the range several times and is qualified, and that is documented," the sheriff said.

Smolen reviewed documents Bates released showing passing scores at the shooting range, though some efforts were marked below the 72 percent passing grade.

Using a slideshow, he said Tulsa sheriff's department policies require that guns used on-duty be the same as those used at the range, unless an officer is off-duty before being called to respond.

State law enforcement training standards do not require that the weapons be the same, but do allow counties and local police to set their own guidelines.

Under those same state standards, once people are certified as law officers they remain authorized to work as long as they maintain weapons skills and aren't de-certified for reasons as varied as being convicted of major crimes or involuntarily committed to a mental health facility.

"Whether they are hired by a particular department or meet that department's requirements ... that is up to the individual department, not CLEET," said James Wilson, the general counsel for the Council on Law Enforcement Education and Training. "If the Tulsa County Sheriff's Office wants to commission them, that's their business, as long as they're certified."

Bates, who sold his insurance business for $6 million in 1999, was trained to be a Tulsa Police Department patrolman in 1964 but left in 1965. He was out of law enforcement for 35 years, returning for volunteer work in Florida in 2000-01 doing ride-alongs before joining the Tulsa County force in 2008 and making a number of donations to the agency. He also was Glanz' campaign manager during the 2012 election.

There was no record of why Bates left the Tulsa Police Department. The agency said it destroys old personnel files after five years.

Glanz' office has said it, too, cannot find all of Bates' records. Monday, Glanz said some of those records could have been destroyed under a new state law that allows agencies to throw away old records after seven years.

"I don't doubt for a second that they can't find these records," said Sen. Brian Crain, a Republican from Tulsa who sponsored the bill. "It's a bureaucracy, and with any bureaucracy you're going to lose track of some records." He said he couldn't recall if it was Glanz or the state Sheriffs Association that asked for the bill.

Glanz, the local sheriff since 1989, was on the Commission of Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies from 2000 to 2005 and said he believed that age standards may be considered in response to Harris' death.

"We follow the national standards. I think that we will be reviewing the national standards for our reserves and age may be an element of that," Glanz said.

But Craig Hartley, CALEA's executive director, said Monday no one has asked for a review, and any mandatory retirement age might not survive a federal court challenge under equal employment laws.

Glanz also said Monday that action will be taken against two deputies at the scene, including one caught on video cursing at Harris as he lay dying. The sheriff said both have received threats and have been reassigned.

"We will review what those officers did and will take some administrative action," the sheriff said, but didn't provide specifics.

The FBI said Monday it had concluded that a civil rights investigation into Harris' death was not warranted "at this time."

The Tulsa World newspaper, citing unidentified sources, has reported that some of Bates' supervisors were told to certify him after he failed to meet some qualifications. Bates released his records Saturday in an effort to refute that claim.

The reporter and editor on the Tulsa World story have resigned "to pursue other opportunities," the newspaper said on its website. Another reporter also leaving the paper said the departure had been in the works for weeks, even before Bates shot Harris.

"We always intended to give notice this week," said former World reporter Cary Aspinwall, who is married to an AP reporter. "This all happened before he shot the guy."

___

Kissel reported from Little Rock, Arkansas. Associated Press writers Justin Juozapavicius in Tulsa and Allen Reed in Little Rock contributed to this report.

  ]]>
AC/DC drummer Phil Rudd pleads guilty to threatening to kill http://www.dailyastorian.com/acdc-drummer-phil-rudd-pleads-guilty-to-threatening-to-kill-da-ap-webfeeds-news-entertainmentbe71b410fcfb4d3fb2f4a23009a2aeba http://www.dailyastorian.com/acdc-drummer-phil-rudd-pleads-guilty-to-threatening-to-kill-da-ap-webfeeds-news-entertainmentbe71b410fcfb4d3fb2f4a23009a2aeba#Comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 18:03:12 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2015304209773 TAURANGA, New Zealand (AP) AC/DC drummer Phil Rudd pleaded guilty in a New Zealand court Tuesday to a charge of threatening to kill a man who used to work for him. He also pleaded guilty to possessing methamphetamine and marijuana.

Rudd faces up to seven years in prison on the threatening to kill charge, although his lawyer Craig Tuck said the prosecution case boils down to an angry phone call, and he is seeking a remedy that would involve no legal consequences for Rudd.

Rudd acknowledged in a court summary of facts that he'd offered large amounts of cash, vehicles and a house to an associate after asking him to have the victim "taken out" and that he'd also directly said to the victim he was going to kill him.

The 60-year-old drummer was released on bail pending a June sentencing hearing.

Rudd arrived at the Tauranga court house in a sports car wearing sunglasses and a red tie, and didn't say anything during his brief appearance other than to enter his guilty pleas.

It's unclear whether Rudd has a future with the Australian rock band he's been part of on-and-off for almost four decades. The band intends to use Welsh drummer Chris Slade for its upcoming "Rock or Bust" album tour but hasn't said if that's a long-term arrangement.

By agreeing with prosecutors to enter the guilty pleas, Rudd avoided the need for a trial which was due to begin Tuesday. Prosecutors agreed to drop a second charge of threatening to kill. Earlier, citing a lack of evidence, prosecutors had dropped a murder-for-hire charge.

According to the court summary, the dispute began in August on the night that Rudd released his solo album, "Head Job."

Rudd threw a party at his marina restaurant, Phil's Place, to celebrate the launch. He was the toast of the town that night, and even the mayor of Tauranga attended. But as the night progressed, Rudd became concerned that security wasn't tight enough.

"The defendant was angry that the album launch did not go well," the court summary said. "As a result he sacked a number of people from his employment and professional team. This included, among other people, the victim who he was particularly angry with."

About four weeks later, Rudd called an associate, who was on vacation in Australia. Rudd told the man he wanted the victim "taken out," according to the court summary. When asked to clarify, Rudd said he wanted the victim "taken care of."

In another call, according to the court summary, Rudd offered the associate "$200,000, a motorbike, one of his cars or a house," which the associate took to mean as payment "for carrying out his earlier request."

Two hundred thousand New Zealand dollars is equivalent to about $153,000 U.S. dollars.

The morning after calling his associate, Rudd called the victim directly, saying "I'm going to come over and kill you," according to the court summary. He tried to call the victim again a couple of times after that but the man didn't pick up.

"As a result of threats made by the defendant, the victim was genuinely very fearful of his safety," the summary of facts stated.

The summary also outlines the Nov. 6 search of Rudd's home when police found the drugs. When police arrived, Rudd was wearing jeans but no shirt, according to the summary.

"While being spoken to by the police, the defendant reached out to move a container containing cannabis crumbs from the coffee table and place it on the floor out of sight," the summary says.

Police found methamphetamine in Rudd's jeans pocket and in his bedroom and marijuana in several places, according to the court summary. In all, police found 0.48 grams (0.02 ounces) of methamphetamine and 91 grams (3.2 ounces) of marijuana, according to the summary.

Tuck said he would be seeking a discharge without conviction in the case.

An unusual loophole in New Zealand law gives a judge the discretion not to enter a conviction even in cases where a defendant has pleaded guilty. A judge can do this if he or she thinks the consequences of a conviction outweigh the seriousness of the crime, a move which can allow a defendant to keep a clean record.

The judge in the case, Robert Wolff, said he would not enter a conviction against Rudd before hearing Tuck's arguments.

Tuck, a human rights lawyer who has acted for Rudd before, took over the case after Rudd dropped his previous attorney, Paul Mabey.

Tuck said the case had done enormous damage to Rudd's reputation and he was looking into legal remedies for that.

 ]]>
Developments in tensions between police and communities http://www.dailyastorian.com/developments-in-tensions-between-police-and-communities-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world6bcec032a8e4426e8e767c9411c51ff6 http://www.dailyastorian.com/developments-in-tensions-between-police-and-communities-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world6bcec032a8e4426e8e767c9411c51ff6#Comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 21:00:45 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2015304209864 Killings of unarmed black men by white police officers in the past year have touched off a national debate about police conduct, which has only escalated as additional interactions between police and suspects lethal or otherwise are captured on video by law enforcement or civilians. Here are some recent developments.

___

DETROIT-AREA OFFICER CHARGED IN VIDEOTAPED BEATING

A prosecutor filed charges Monday against a police officer who pulled a man from his car during a Detroit-area traffic stop and beat him.

Wayne County Prosecutor Kym Worthy said public confidence in law enforcement is "eroded" when officers abuse citizens.

Inkster officer William Melendez, who was recently fired, is charged with mistreatment of a prisoner and assault. Melendez has said "there are always two sides to every story."

Floyd Dent, 57, was bloodied by repeated punches to the head during the January traffic stop, which came to light in March when a TV station obtained the police dashcam video.

Meanwhile, no charges will be filed in a separate videotaped incident involving officers from Grosse Pointe Park and Highland Park. Carjacking suspect Andrew Jackson was kicked and punched while on the ground during an arrest in Detroit.

___

POLICE: BALTIMORE MAN WHO DIED ARRESTED 'WITHOUT FORCE'

A Baltimore man who died a week after his spine was nearly severed while in custody had been arrested "without force or incident," police said in court documents obtained Monday.

The officers had asked before 25-year-old Freddie Gray died of his injuries that he be charged with carrying a switchblade, punishable by a year in prison and a $500 fine, according to court records. One record says he suffered a medical emergency on April 12 while being taken to the station in a van and was rushed to the hospital.

Civilian video showed Gray being loaded into the van, but not the entire encounter. Police also released videos Monday showing Gray's arrest, but not what happened in the van.

Deputy Commissioner Jerry Rodriguez said the officers have been suspended. He added the autopsy shows that Gray suffered "a significant spinal injury that led to his death," but investigators don't know the cause.

"When Mr. Gray was put in that van, he could talk, he was upset, and when he was taken out of that van, he could not talk and he could not breathe," Rodriguez said.

___

TULSA SHERIFF: VOLUNTEER DEPUTY'S TRAINING RECORD NOT FALSIFIED

Tulsa County Sheriff Stanley Glanz said Monday he doesn't believe training records for a volunteer deputy were falsified.

Insurance executive Robert Bates, 73, is charged with second-degree manslaughter in the death of Eric Harris, who was shot April 2 after running from officers during a sting investigation. Bates mistook his handgun for a stun gun.

Glanz said that Bates, his longtime insurance agent, was properly trained and passed annual state-mandated firearms certifications. Glanz also said that action will be taken against two deputies at the scene, including one caught on video cursing at Harris as he lay dying. The sheriff didn't specify what that action may entail.

Glanz said he's known Bates for about 25 years. He added the FBI had determined Bates didn't violate Harris' civil rights.

Dan Smolen, a lawyer for Harris' family, said Monday that the sheriff's office violated a number of its internal policies by letting Bates carry his personal handgun after training at the range on another weapon.

The Tulsa World newspaper, citing unidentified sources, has reported some of Bates' supervisors were told to certify him after he failed to meet some qualifications. Bates has disputed those reports.

___

EXPERT: CLEVELAND OFFICER WRONG TO FIRE FINAL SHOTS IN 2 SUSPECTS' KILLING

Prosecutors' paid use-of-force expert said Monday a Cleveland police officer acted unreasonably when he climbed onto a police cruiser and the hood of a car to fire fatal shots at two unarmed suspects after a high-speed chase in November 2012.

The expert testified at the voluntary manslaughter trial of patrolman Michael Brelo, who is on unpaid administrative leave. Prosecutors say he fired the final 15 rounds of a 137-shot barrage.

The expert said officers had reason to think their lives were in danger after the suspects' car backfired, a sound that was mistaken for a gunshot. But he says the car had stopped and no longer posed a threat when Brelo fired.

___

PENNSYLVANIA ATTORNEYS SPAR OVER RELEASING VIDEO IN MOTORIST'S SHOOTING DEATH

A hearing is set for Tuesday on whether to bar the release of video in the case of the central Pennsylvania police officer charged in the shooting death of a motorist.

The video is from a camera mounted on a stun gun. District Attorney Edward Marisco Jr. called the video the strongest evidence in the case. Defense attorney Brian Perry has argued releasing the video could taint the jury pool.

Authorities say the video shows Hummelstown police officer Lisa Mearkle firing two bullets into the back of David Kassick, 59, as he lay face down after a traffic stop. Mearkle said she feared Kassick was reaching into his jacket for a gun.

Mearkle, charged with criminal homicide in the Feb. 2 incident, waived her preliminary hearing Monday.

     ]]>
Utah woman gets up to life in prison in deaths of 6 newborns http://www.dailyastorian.com/utah-woman-gets-up-to-life-in-prison-in-deaths-of-6-newborns-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world6e29a61e7e6c4b1d9cd72f94e4e62967 http://www.dailyastorian.com/utah-woman-gets-up-to-life-in-prison-in-deaths-of-6-newborns-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world6e29a61e7e6c4b1d9cd72f94e4e62967#Comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 21:01:23 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2015304209866 PROVO, Utah (AP) A mother who killed six of her newborn babies and hid their bodies in her garage was sentenced to up to life in prison Monday at an emotional hearing in which a prosecutor depicted her as an "incredibly indifferent and callous" murderer.

The judge imposed a sentence against Megan Huntsman that went beyond what was called for in a plea deal because he was so repelled by the killings. Judge Darold McDade said that he heard about the case before it came to his courtroom and hoped it wouldn't be assigned to him.

Huntsman, 40, told police she was too addicted to methamphetamine to care for more children during the decade when the babies were killed. Police said she concealed her pregnancies, gave birth at home and choked and strangled the children with her own hands just minutes after they were born. She killed six babies, and a seventh body of a newborn found in her garage was found to be stillborn.

Police found the bodies wrapped in cloth, put in plastic bags and packed into boxes. She eventually moved out of the house and left the decomposing remains behind. She thought about moving the bodies, but said she couldn't think of a way to do it without getting caught.

It remains unclear how Huntsman concealed the pregnancies, births and murders from family members and friends.

"These were very cold, calculated killings," prosecutor Jeff Buhman. "She was a woman who was remarkably, unbelievably, incredibly indifferent and callous."

Family members sobbed in the courtroom as Pleasant Grove police Detective Dan Beckstrom spoke about the killings.

He said the first body was discovered by one of the couple's daughters as she cleaned out the garage with her father, Darren West, shortly after he finished an eight-year federal prison stint on meth charges in April 2014. He lived with Huntsman during the decade when the babies were killed, but police have said they aren't investigating him in the deaths.

Huntsman has three surviving children, and Huntsman opted to not kill one of them because people found out about the pregnancy, Buhman said.

Still, her family painted a picture of a shy, quiet person in a bad marriage who didn't know how to speak up for herself but was a good mother to her three other children.

Huntsman said in a statement she couldn't explain the deaths to herself. She could be seen dabbing at her eyes during the hearing, but she showed little other visible emotion.

"I know I didn't feel strong enough to be a mother to those tiny babies, and in some small way I wanted to help them avoid the terrible life I would have given them," said defense attorney Anthony Howell, reading from a letter she wrote.

Sister Jamie Huntsman read letters from two of Huntsman's other children, who described their mother as smiling and laughing.

"This is not the mom I know," she read. "I remember the mom I know, the one that made dinner for us every night, cleaned our house and loved not only her kids but kids in general."

The description contrasted sharply with new details revealed by police Monday.

Buhman said she gave birth at home, twice when other people were in the house.

"She made sure the bathroom, or the bedroom, was cleaned before anyone got home and the baby was wrapped up quickly and thoroughly and stored in the garage before anyone would know," Buhman said.

Over the years, she could smell their decomposing bodies in the garage but never moved them, he said.

West spoke briefly to reporters outside the courtroom Monday, saying that the details about the babies' deaths were difficult to hear.

She agreed to plead guilty rather than go to trial under an agreement that reduced her minimum possible sentence to five years but left fewer options for appeal. Prosecutors said it would have been hard to prove the case against her at trial if she hadn't cooperated with police.

McDade departed from that deal Monday, giving Huntsman a longer minimum sentence. "I really thought I'd seen it all until this case came along," he said.

A parole board will make the final decision on how much time Huntsman spends in prison.

The sentence brings closure to a case that shocked residents of Pleasant Grove, the mostly Mormon community about 35 miles south of Salt Lake City where Huntsman stored her babies' tiny bodies for more than a decade.

         ]]>
Chargers' Woodhead, Dunlap deflect talk of LA, Rivers trade http://www.dailyastorian.com/chargers-woodhead-dunlap-deflect-talk-of-la-rivers-trade-da-ap-webfeeds-news-pro-sports88d4eb04257d4c3d8c2c5386eea2efba http://www.dailyastorian.com/chargers-woodhead-dunlap-deflect-talk-of-la-rivers-trade-da-ap-webfeeds-news-pro-sports88d4eb04257d4c3d8c2c5386eea2efba#Comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 17:01:35 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2015304209774 SAN DIEGO (AP) The Chargers are still in San Diego and Philip Rivers is still their quarterback.

That's all Danny Woodhead and King Dunlap were concerned about as the Chargers who for the time being remain Southern California's only NFL team began offseason workouts Monday amid uncertainty on two fronts.

Woodhead said he's been tuning out talk of the Chargers possibly moving to Los Angeles, as well as rumors that Rivers, who's entering the final year of his contract, could be traded to Tennessee so the Chargers can draft Marcus Mariota.

"He's on our team and he's our quarterback. We definitely like having him as our quarterback. As far as I know he's still on our team, right?" Woodhead said with a laugh. "I think that's more fun for you guys to talk about."

The workout was closed and Rivers did not address the media.

"He's a leader, is what he does," Woodhead added about Rivers. "He's one of the best in the league at his position and we're very fortunate to have him on the field on Sundays and we're fortunate to have him working out with us. He's a great player."

Rivers has said that with so much uncertainty surrounding the team, he's likely to play out his current contract rather than agreeing to an extension, and he seems unenthused about the possibility of having to move to Los Angeles.

The Chargers and their biggest rivals, the Oakland Raiders, in February announced plans to build a $1.7 billion stadium in the Los Angeles suburb of Carson if they don't get new stadiums in their current hometowns.

The AFC West foes were responding to the possibility of the St. Louis Rams moving to Los Angeles. Rams owner Stan Kroenke is part of a joint venture that wants to build an 80,000-seat stadium in the L.A. suburb of Inglewood.

There have been rumors that the Chargers could trade Rivers to Tennessee for the second pick overall and use it on Mariota, the Heisman Trophy winner from Oregon.

Dunlap, the left tackle, hopes he gets to continue to protect Rivers' blind side.

"That's our quarterback. I mean, he's one of the elite quarterbacks in the league," Dunlap said. "What he brings, not a lot of guys have. Him being the guy is, we're out there working for him to help him to do his job better, especially up front. If we do our job as offensive linemen, it helps him do his job a lot better and he can be the elite quarterback that he is and produce like he does, like he has for the past 10, 11 years."

Said new receiver Stevie Johnson: "Rumors is rumors. He's here now."

Johnson said he watched Rivers highlights on YouTube shortly after he signed with the Chargers in the offseason.

While team ownership doesn't want to be in Qualcomm Stadium, Johnson said he wants to score a touchdown there. He was with Buffalo when it played at Qualcomm in 2011 and he failed to score.

As for Los Angeles, Woodhead said he hasn't done much thinking about a possible move north if the Chargers can't get a stadium deal out of San Diego.

"I'm a day-by-day guy, I'm an in-the-present guy. I'm trying to focus on getting ready for 2015," he said. "I'm signed up to play football. That's what I'm supposed to do. I'm focusing on that."

Woodhead said there hasn't been a lot of talk about L.A. among his teammates.

"If you've been in this business long enough, you know that tomorrow's not guaranteed," he said. "People lose their jobs very quickly, very often. You're more concerned about going out there every day and approaching your job the same way. ... Our approach is, hey, let's get better every day. Whenever stuff like that is decided, it'll be decided. But that's totally out of our control. What's in our control is trying to get better as a football player. I know it's a boring answer, but that's the truth."

___

Follow Bernie Wilson on Twitter at http://twitter.com/berniewilson

___

Online: http://pro32.ap.org/poll and http://twitter.com/AP_NFL

]]>
Chiefs' Houston skips report date for offseason program http://www.dailyastorian.com/chiefs-houston-skips-report-date-for-offseason-program-da-ap-webfeeds-news-pro-sports753e7052453040c484f6d52726c87718 http://www.dailyastorian.com/chiefs-houston-skips-report-date-for-offseason-program-da-ap-webfeeds-news-pro-sports753e7052453040c484f6d52726c87718#Comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 17:01:39 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2015304209800 KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) The Kansas City Chiefs reported for the start of their offseason program on Monday.

Well, most of them did.

The most notable absence was All-Pro linebacker Justin Houston, who was given the franchise tag after a record-setting sack season. Houston still has not signed his tender as the Chiefs and his representatives try to reach an agreement on a long-term deal.

"I'm hopeful they'll get it worked out," Chiefs coach Andy Reid said. "I think both sides want to be here for whatever's sake. I know the jockeying. I've been around long enough to understand how it works out, particularly when you're doing negotiations with good players."

The Chiefs and Houston began talking about a long-term deal last offseason, but were unable to make much headway. Houston ended up playing under the final year of his rookie deal, and finished with 22 sacks to break the franchise single-season record held by Derrick Thomas.

His performance only drove his asking price up, and the Chiefs could need to get creative to meet it. In the meantime, they've slapped the franchise tag on Houston he has yet to sign the tender that would mean a one-year deal worth more than $13 million.

"They'll come to a number that works out for both sides and he'll be here for a long time," Reid said. "I know on the other side, Justin is going to work his tail off, because that's the way he's wired, to make sure he's ready to go when the time comes."

Fellow linebacker Derrick Johnson also sounded optimistic Houston will arrive eventually.

"Probably shouldn't talk about guys who aren't here," Johnson said, "but when the season hits, we'll have all our bullets. Put it like that."

In other news, Johnson said he was nearly 100 percent after missing nearly all of last season with a torn Achilles tendon. Johnson has been taking part in full workouts for a while, but said that he won't know for sure where he's at until teams can begin on-field work.

"It's not in the back of my mind," he said of the injury. "Mentally, it's been awhile since my injury, and that has to go away for you to succeed and get back to where you left off."

Defensive tackle Mike DeVito, who also tore his Achilles tendon in last season's opener, also reported for the start of the voluntary workouts and pronounced himself ready to go.

"I think I would have considered retirement if I had to go through that myself," said DeVito, who worked side by side with Johnson on his rehab. "But working with a guy like DJ, day-in and day-out, getting in there and going through this, we really felt that bond."

The first phase of the offseason program allows players to lift weights and do conditioning at the team facility, and coaches to work with players in the classroom. It also allows quarterbacks to throw passes to wide receivers as they begin to build some chemistry.

Alex Smith, who missed last season's finale with a lacerated spleen, was able to get onto the field for the first time with Jeremy Maclin, who signed a five-year, $55 million deal with Kansas City in the offseason. They ran a couple of routes in the indoor facility nothing too fancy but both of them could already tell that chemistry would be no problem.

"It's our job to get it done, to get it done as efficient as possible and as fast as possible," Maclin said. "We're going to continue to work over the course of the offseason, but the way Alex carries himself, the way I carry myself, we'll be just fine."

Smith said he's been medically cleared to take part in workouts, and that the only thing the spleen injury prevented him from doing last season was taking a hit.

"Literally a few weeks after our season, that was the timeline they had given me that I would be fine," Smith said. "It didn't restrict me. Normal life. I could work out, run, do everything I needed to do. Just kind of went about my business, and this point, it's felt great for a while."

___

Online:

AP NFL website: www.pro32.ap.org and www.twitter.com/AP_NFL

]]>
Family spokesman: Alabama woman leaves to join ISIS in Syria http://www.dailyastorian.com/family-spokesman-alabama-woman-leaves-to-join-isis-in-syria-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world91b3bf93ee304e928bfa998ff97bb15d http://www.dailyastorian.com/family-spokesman-alabama-woman-leaves-to-join-isis-in-syria-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world91b3bf93ee304e928bfa998ff97bb15d#Comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 17:01:28 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2015304209776 BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) A spokesman for a Muslim couple in Alabama says their 20-year-old daughter fled a Birmingham suburb to join ISIS militants in Syria after being recruited on the Internet.

Attorney Hassan Shibly spoke at a Birmingham mosque on Monday on behalf of the parents of the young woman, whom he identified only as Hoda.

Shibly said Hoda left in November after being "brainwashed" for an undetermined length of time. He says the woman's actions go against the family's wishes and against the teachings of Islam.

The spokesman added that Hoda's family has been in contact with U.S. law enforcement and government officials since she disappeared.

Members of the Birmingham Muslim community were meeting on Monday evening to discuss how to protect other children from the influence of violent extremists.

]]>
Oregon bill would prohibit charges for filming police http://www.dailyastorian.com/oregon-bill-would-prohibit-charges-for-filming-police-da-ap-webfeeds-news-northwest095d30711e224d69864f11b7c5ac6d9b http://www.dailyastorian.com/oregon-bill-would-prohibit-charges-for-filming-police-da-ap-webfeeds-news-northwest095d30711e224d69864f11b7c5ac6d9b#Comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 17:00:20 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2015304209784 SALEM, Ore. (AP) The Oregon Legislature is looking to make it legal for citizens to film the police, as long as they don't interfere.

The House Judiciary Committee approved a bill Monday that says merely videotaping a police, parole or probation officer does not constitute the crime of interfering with the official's duties.

The committee's 7-2 vote sends the measure to a vote in the full House.

The American Civil Liberties Union, which supports the bill, says Oregon law isn't clear on the legality of videotaping police officers. The ACLU says people who document arrests and the use of force shouldn't be subject to arrest and prosecution.

Critics of the bill worry about protecting officers' privacy and ensuring people can't surreptitiously record tactical conversations.

]]>
Judge returns ultra-rich club founder Tim Blixseth to jail http://www.dailyastorian.com/judge-returns-ultra-rich-club-founder-tim-blixseth-to-jail-da-ap-webfeeds-news-northwest51ed879ee14a4bc197ee3e474adc9c9d http://www.dailyastorian.com/judge-returns-ultra-rich-club-founder-tim-blixseth-to-jail-da-ap-webfeeds-news-northwest51ed879ee14a4bc197ee3e474adc9c9d#Comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 17:00:23 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2015304209874 HELENA, Mont. (AP) A federal judge ordered the founder of a luxury Montana mountain resort back to jail Monday, saying he failed to disclose what happened to $13.8 million from the sale of a resort in Mexico.

Former billionaire Tim Blixseth, 64, was taken into custody by the U.S. Marshals Service after a contempt hearing in Helena.

U.S. District Judge Sam Haddon found Blixseth had not complied with orders requiring a complete accounting of how the money was spent.

The case stems from the bankruptcy of the Yellowstone Club near Big Sky, a private ski and golf resort, which boasts a $300,000 entry fee.

Authorities say Blixseth misappropriated $270 million from the club before he gave up control as part a 2008 divorce and that he purchased the Tamarindo resort in the Mexican state of Jalisco with some of the money.

After a bankruptcy judge ordered him not to sell it, Blixseth sold the property anyway, for $13.8 million, funds Haddon said should go to creditors in the bankruptcy case.

Creditors, however, allege Blixseth used the money to pay for trips to Europe, luxury aircraft and boats, and tens of thousands of dollars in fine wine.

Haddon said Blixseth would remain jailed until he provides a full accounting of the money from the sale in compliance with three previous court orders. He said he would not entertain any requests for variances or petitions for release.

Blixseth attorney Philip Stillman said he planned to file an emergency motion with the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals seeking his client's release. Stillman the judge hadn't made clear what Blixseth needed to do. "Tim Blixseth has produced every single scrap of paper he was ordered to produce and could produce," Stillman said.

Haddon, however, said Blixseth has been provided with clear and unequivocal directions throughout.

Haddon previously jailed Blixseth for a week in December after finding him in contempt for not giving up details on the sale. Blixseth was freed after seven days by an appeals court.

Haddon, speaking angrily at times, noted Monday that Blixseth's attorneys made a "document dump" Saturday night, filing more than 200 more pages that "left it entirely for this court to figure out what it all means." He said Blixseth still hasn't provided records from his personal bank accounts.

The Yellowstone Club went bankrupt after Blixseth turned it over to his ex-wife in 2008. It's been under new ownership since 2009.

Montana revenue officials say he owes almost $74 million in back taxes, penalties and interest in the state, after diverting the money from the club to buy luxury cars, jets and high-priced properties in Mexico, Scotland and elsewhere.

Blixseth, of Medina, Washington, has judgments against him for more than $250 million from the liquidating trust.

Blixseth has denied wrongdoing and fought the allegations at every turn.

___

Brown reported from Billings.

]]>
More copies of Laura Ingalls Wilder memoir being printed http://www.dailyastorian.com/more-copies-of-laura-ingalls-wilder-memoir-being-printed-da-ap-webfeeds-news-entertainment83bdf8a03183407cbbf4694aa19147d7 http://www.dailyastorian.com/more-copies-of-laura-ingalls-wilder-memoir-being-printed-da-ap-webfeeds-news-entertainment83bdf8a03183407cbbf4694aa19147d7#Comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 17:01:51 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2015304209772 SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) South Dakota's state-owned publishing house is printing more copies of the best-selling memoir by prairie author Laura Ingalls Wilder.

"Pioneer Girl: The Annotated Autobiography," edited by Pamela Smith Hill, was released in November. It has proved to be a blockbuster for the South Dakota Historical Society Press. It's in its fourth week on the New York Times Best Sellers list and as of early May will have 125,000 copies in print.

"We were anticipating we would print 5,000," Nancy Tystad Koupal, director of the South Dakota Historical Society Press, told the Argus Leader newspaper (http://argusne.ws/1HL0PTX ).

Wilder penned the popular children's series of "Little House on the Prairie" books, but her autobiography was written for an adult audience and gives a more realistic, grittier view of frontier living.

"We knew we had a perennially popular author, Laura Ingalls Wilder," Koupal said. "We had a book that we had worked very hard to make sure it was readable and accessible not one academic talking to another. We knew we had a readable book and a popular author, but we didn't think best-seller."

Books from fourth and fifth printing runs will be shipped to distributors, online booksellers and bookstores by early May, according to Jeff Mammenga, media coordinator for the State Historical Society. A sixth print run likely will come in late summer or early fall in preparation for Christmas.

"But who knows?" Koupal said. "Every time I guess on this it just goes crazy. I have no idea what will really happen. It has been amazing."

___

Information from: Argus Leader, http://www.argusleader.com

]]>
Winning numbers drawn in 'Pick 4 4PM' game http://www.dailyastorian.com/winning-numbers-drawn-in-pick-4-4pm-game-da-ap-webfeeds-news-northwest84375d8e78c44a048f92d3dc0ea7be15 http://www.dailyastorian.com/winning-numbers-drawn-in-pick-4-4pm-game-da-ap-webfeeds-news-northwest84375d8e78c44a048f92d3dc0ea7be15#Comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 17:00:24 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2015304199864 PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) The winning numbers in Monday afternoon's drawing of the Oregon Lottery's "Pick 4 4PM" game were:

2-2-9-1

(two, two, nine, one)

]]>
Little 9: Cavaliers bench players boosting team's "Big 3" http://www.dailyastorian.com/little-9-cavaliers-bench-players-boosting-teams-big-3-da-ap-webfeeds-news-pro-sports0fd79412a41a481b878f0f9f72ba6b5d http://www.dailyastorian.com/little-9-cavaliers-bench-players-boosting-teams-big-3-da-ap-webfeeds-news-pro-sports0fd79412a41a481b878f0f9f72ba6b5d#Comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 18:01:49 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2015304209768 INDEPENDENCE, Ohio (AP) For all their talent and celebrity, the Cavaliers' "Big 3" can't win an NBA title by themselves.

Not without help from Cleveland's reserves those other guys.

Although they may not have the catchy nickname of their three famous teammates, Cleveland's two other starters J.R. Smith and Timofey Mozgov and the team's supporting cast of bench players have had a huge impact on the Cavaliers' season and are off to a strong start in the playoffs.

While LeBron James, Kyrie Irving and Kevin Love did their usual damage, combining for 69 points in Sunday's 113-100 win over the Boston Celtics, it was Cleveland's backups who came through in Game 1.

James Jones made two huge shots in the third quarter to stop Boston's comeback; Tristan Thompson scored 12 points and crashed the boards; Iman Shumpert played his usual stifling defense; Matthew Dellavedova brought energy; Shawn Marion made the most of his 56 seconds and Kendrick Perkins gave an impassioned pregame speech to his new teammates.

"It's what we need. Those guys did a heckuva job," James said Monday as the Cavs prepared for Game 2 in the best-of-7 series on Tuesday night.

Cleveland's "Little 9" have been doing it all season, helping the Cavs overcome a sluggish start to finish with the No. 2 seed in the Eastern Conference. But doing it during the regular season is totally different than in the playoffs when every possession is magnified. The Cavs showcased the depth they'll need in order to win a championship.

And just as James, Irving and Love had to make personal sacrifices, Cleveland's second-stringers have forgone individual accolades for team success.

"It's like a company. You have your janitor, your CEO. You have your secretaries," said Thompson, who said his job is to bring energy as a reserve. "I don't mind being the cleanup guy, punching the clock. I'll do all the little things."

Jones came up big in Game 1.

After the Celtics scored 14 consecutive points to trim Cleveland's lead to six, Jones, forced to play more than usual because J.R. Smith was in foul trouble, hit a back-down, turnaround jumper just his 12th two-point basket of the season and then drained a 3-pointer at the horn to give the Cavaliers a 15-point lead.

Once his long-range jumper splashed through the hoop, Jones, who won two titles while getting little playing time with James in Miami, raised his arms and soaked in the screams and applause of 20,000 fans.

James said Jones has been waiting for the playoffs.

"I know what he's capable of doing," James said. "For him to have a moment like that last night, I was extremely happy for him."

Jones understands the Cavs will only go as far as the "Big 3" take them. But the trades that brought Smith, Shumpert and Mozgov made Cleveland a more complete team.

"They added another dynamic: youth, speed, athleticism, shooting, all the things we needed to interject into this mix," Jones said. "They are a very big reason for why we've been playing well."

James laughed when asked if he taught Jones the post-up move that led to his clutch basket.

"No, man," James said with a laugh. "J.J was actually a post-up player in college. He said he got to Indiana and Rick Carlisle told him, 'If you want to be on the floor, you need to go over there and shoot with Reggie (Miller).' So that's when he became a shooter."

Thompson has gladly accepted his reserve role, and he finished fifth in voting for the NBA's Sixth Man Award. Thompson doesn't need the glory. He's more than happy to roll up his sleeves and do whatever's necessary.

"I'll be a janitor forever," he said. "There's nothing wrong with that. Everyone has their place in the factory. I don't mind doing the little things. That's what it takes to win and be great."

]]>
Little 9: Cavaliers bench players boosting team's "Big 3" http://www.dailyastorian.com/little-9-cavaliers-bench-players-boosting-teams-big-3-da-ap-webfeeds-news-entertainment0fd79412a41a481b878f0f9f72ba6b5d http://www.dailyastorian.com/little-9-cavaliers-bench-players-boosting-teams-big-3-da-ap-webfeeds-news-entertainment0fd79412a41a481b878f0f9f72ba6b5d#Comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 17:01:56 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2015304209795 INDEPENDENCE, Ohio (AP) For all their talent and celebrity, the Cavaliers' "Big 3" can't win an NBA title by themselves.

Not without help from Cleveland's reserves those other guys.

Although they may not have the catchy nickname of their three famous teammates, Cleveland's two other starters J.R. Smith and Timofey Mozgov and the team's supporting cast of bench players have had a huge impact on the Cavaliers' season and are off to a strong start in the playoffs.

While LeBron James, Kyrie Irving and Kevin Love did their usual damage, combining for 69 points in Sunday's 113-100 win over the Boston Celtics, it was Cleveland's backups who came through in Game 1.

James Jones made two huge shots in the third quarter to stop Boston's comeback; Tristan Thompson scored 12 points and crashed the boards; Iman Shumpert played his usual stifling defense; Matthew Dellavedova brought energy; Shawn Marion made the most of his 56 seconds and Kendrick Perkins gave an impassioned pregame speech to his new teammates.

"It's what we need. Those guys did a heckuva job," James said Monday as the Cavs prepared for Game 2 in the best-of-7 series on Tuesday night.

Cleveland's "Little 9" have been doing it all season, helping the Cavs overcome a sluggish start to finish with the No. 2 seed in the Eastern Conference. But doing it during the regular season is totally different than in the playoffs when every possession is magnified. The Cavs showcased the depth they'll need in order to win a championship.

And just as James, Irving and Love had to make personal sacrifices, Cleveland's second-stringers have forgone individual accolades for team success.

"It's like a company. You have your janitor, your CEO. You have your secretaries," said Thompson, who said his job is to bring energy as a reserve. "I don't mind being the cleanup guy, punching the clock. I'll do all the little things."

Jones came up big in Game 1.

After the Celtics scored 14 consecutive points to trim Cleveland's lead to six, Jones, forced to play more than usual because J.R. Smith was in foul trouble, hit a back-down, turnaround jumper just his 12th two-point basket of the season and then drained a 3-pointer at the horn to give the Cavaliers a 15-point lead.

Once his long-range jumper splashed through the hoop, Jones, who won two titles while getting little playing time with James in Miami, raised his arms and soaked in the screams and applause of 20,000 fans.

James said Jones has been waiting for the playoffs.

"I know what he's capable of doing," James said. "For him to have a moment like that last night, I was extremely happy for him."

Jones understands the Cavs will only go as far as the "Big 3" take them. But the trades that brought Smith, Shumpert and Mozgov made Cleveland a more complete team.

"They added another dynamic: youth, speed, athleticism, shooting, all the things we needed to interject into this mix," Jones said. "They are a very big reason for why we've been playing well."

James laughed when asked if he taught Jones the post-up move that led to his clutch basket.

"No, man," James said with a laugh. "J.J was actually a post-up player in college. He said he got to Indiana and Rick Carlisle told him, 'If you want to be on the floor, you need to go over there and shoot with Reggie (Miller).' So that's when he became a shooter."

Thompson has gladly accepted his reserve role, and he finished fifth in voting for the NBA's Sixth Man Award. Thompson doesn't need the glory. He's more than happy to roll up his sleeves and do whatever's necessary.

"I'll be a janitor forever," he said. "There's nothing wrong with that. Everyone has their place in the factory. I don't mind doing the little things. That's what it takes to win and be great."

]]>
De la Renta unveils first bridal line since designer's death http://www.dailyastorian.com/de-la-renta-unveils-first-bridal-line-since-designers-death-da-ap-webfeeds-news-entertainment795d4bce8bbd47f1a3516a74c6dc5c13 http://www.dailyastorian.com/de-la-renta-unveils-first-bridal-line-since-designers-death-da-ap-webfeeds-news-entertainment795d4bce8bbd47f1a3516a74c6dc5c13#Comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 18:03:17 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2015304209817 NEW YORK (AP) Peter Copping had hoped to work alongside Oscar de la Renta, but it was not to be: Just days after Copping was hired last October as artistic director of the luxury label, the legendary de la Renta passed away from cancer.

In February, Copping presented his debut collection at New York Fashion Week, and on Saturday barely two months later he showed his first bridal line, a big occasion for a label known for dressing high-profile brides like Amal Clooney.

Luckily for Copping, who is British, the New York weather on Saturday was decidedly summery perfect for brides. His collection retained much of the classic de la Renta glamour lots of tulle and organza but added a few more modern-looking silhouettes, some new takes on fabric work, and some silvery sequins. One of the most versatile looks came last, a white tiered ballgown in tulle with two bottom layers that were removable, to form a stylish minidress for dancing into the night.

Backstage after the show, Copping reflected on the collection. (The interview has been edited for length.)

AP: You showed your first collection in February, and now this. Has it been a whirlwind?

Copping: Yes, it's tough to get it done in the time you have. But I did take some of the elements from the fall collection and brought them through into this one. Some of the ways we were working with fabrics for fall seemed really appropriate for bridal, so I thought it would be nice to use that as a stepping stone. For example, one dress was formed from lots of strips of organza; there was something very similar in a bordeaux (color) in the last show. So we did it in a lighter fabric here and we added lace as well.

AP: You've spoken of the need to both preserve tradition in your new post, but also add in your own new touches. Did you do that here?

Copping: Yes, I think the way we treated some of the embroidery, and some of the silhouettes; you know it's just small touches, but small things can go a long way.

AP: Anything absolutely new for you here?

Copping: I haven't done a lot of tulle like this, so that's quite new for me. I do think there a lot of women that do want that sort of princess gown. So that's really important, to cater to that clientele. And this (last gown) we also made it very versatile, the two layers underneath can be removed and you end up with a very ballerina, swanlike dress. So that can be perfect for later in the evening when she wants to let loose and party. Also new is a lot of the ways lace is used sometimes using strips of it. We were playing around with it a bit.

AP: Do you feel there's less freedom in a bridal collection?

Copping: There are certain restrictions, but that's not a bad thing. I like to work within parameters sometimes. For example, not having to really worry about color! It was white or ivory, with little touches of silver. That's why we played around with the shoes, putting color there, and on some of the ribbons on the clothes.

AP: It's still your first year at the label. Are you getting more comfortable?

Copping: Well, coming up is resort and then after that is the spring-summer collection. I think it's only going to be once I've done an entire year of collections that I'll really get a good handle on things.

AP: Are you enjoying the move to New York?

Copping: I am. After 20 years in Paris, I quite surprised myself with how much I've settled in and am enjoying the city.

                        ]]>
7-hour hearing set for bill expanding background checks http://www.dailyastorian.com/7-hour-hearing-set-for-bill-expanding-background-checks-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world9e1c076ec6e44db9a7c9da3a85b7c3d8 http://www.dailyastorian.com/7-hour-hearing-set-for-bill-expanding-background-checks-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world9e1c076ec6e44db9a7c9da3a85b7c3d8#Comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 18:00:55 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2015304209770 SALEM, Ore. (AP) A seven-hour hearing has been scheduled for a bill expanding background checks to cover most private gun sales.

The House Committee on Rules set the public hearing for Wednesday. They'll also hold a two-hour informational meeting prior to hearing public testimony.

If the bill passes, most gun transfers between people who aren't close relatives would have to take place in front of a licensed gun dealer who can perform a background check.

Critics say the proposal would do little to curb gun violence. Proponents argue it's needed to stop people from buying firearms online without a background check.

A two-hour Senate committee public hearing on the bill drew criticism from Republican lawmakers who said it didn't allow enough time for everyone to testify.

___

SB 941

]]>
7-hour hearing set for bill expanding background checks http://www.dailyastorian.com/7-hour-hearing-set-for-bill-expanding-background-checks-da-ap-webfeeds-news-northwest9e1c076ec6e44db9a7c9da3a85b7c3d8 http://www.dailyastorian.com/7-hour-hearing-set-for-bill-expanding-background-checks-da-ap-webfeeds-news-northwest9e1c076ec6e44db9a7c9da3a85b7c3d8#Comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 17:00:27 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2015304209783 SALEM, Ore. (AP) A seven-hour hearing has been scheduled for a bill expanding background checks to cover most private gun sales.

The House Committee on Rules set the public hearing for Wednesday. They'll also hold a two-hour informational meeting prior to hearing public testimony.

If the bill passes, most gun transfers between people who aren't close relatives would have to take place in front of a licensed gun dealer who can perform a background check.

Critics say the proposal would do little to curb gun violence. Proponents argue it's needed to stop people from buying firearms online without a background check.

A two-hour Senate committee public hearing on the bill drew criticism from Republican lawmakers who said it didn't allow enough time for everyone to testify.

___

SB 941

]]>