The Daily Astorian | http://www.dailyastorian.com The Daily Astorian Mon, 25 Jul 2016 23:17:53 -0400 en http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/staticimage/images/rss-logo.jpg The Daily Astorian | http://www.dailyastorian.com White Sox ace Sale to start Thursday at Cubs http://www.dailyastorian.com/white-sox-ace-sale-to-start-thursday-at-cubs-da-ap-webfeeds-news-pro-sports4fa83802294e4fb7a00777f03d3fed4c http://www.dailyastorian.com/white-sox-ace-sale-to-start-thursday-at-cubs-da-ap-webfeeds-news-pro-sports4fa83802294e4fb7a00777f03d3fed4c#Comments Mon, 25 Jul 2016 22:50:43 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016307259632 CHICAGO (AP) — White Sox ace Chris Sale told MLB.com on Monday he got upset with the team when he felt it placed more emphasis on a promotion than winning.

Sale will start Thursday against the crosstown Cubs in his first appearance since the ace left-hander was punished by the team for destroying collared throwback uniforms it was scheduled to wear.

"I'm going to show up on Thursday and do what I've always done. That's get ready to play baseball and put everything I got into winning that game," Sale told the website . "I know my teammates are, too. So that's all that matters to me. It's unfortunate it got to this point."

Speaking before Monday night's 5-4 victory over the Cubs, manager Robin Ventura said he doesn't think he needs to meet with Sale before the outing at Wrigley Field.

"Not necessarily. He's going to pitch," Ventura said. "That's what he does."

The 27-year-old Sale was scratched from his scheduled start Saturday night against Detroit and sent home after he cut up an unknown number of jerseys before the game. The 1976-style jerseys were navy and sported unusual collars on a hot and humid night. Sale called the uniforms "uncomfortable and unorthodox."

"When I saw that there was something in the way of that 100 percent winning mentality, I had an issue," Sale said in the interview with MLB.com. "I tried to bring it up and say, 'Hey listen, these are my thoughts and concerns,' and they got pushed away because of the business deal that was set in place. I'll never understand why we need to do something on the business side on the field that might impede us winning a game."

The suspension cost Sale $250,000 of his $9.15 million salary. He also was fined about $12,700 — the cost of the destroyed jerseys — according to a person familiar with the penalty. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because no statements were authorized.

"Robin is the one who has to fight for us in that department," Sale said. "If the players don't feel comfortable 100 percent about what we are doing to win the game, and we have an easy fix — it was as easy as hanging up another jersey and everyone was fine. For them to put business first over winning, that's when I lost it."

Sale apologized to fans that went to Saturday's game to see him pitch, but stood by his decision to protest the throwback jerseys.

"I have regret, because I play 33 times a year at most in the regular season. So I put a lot of emphasis on when I play and I take a lot of pride in work that I do," Sale said. "When I can't or don't do that, yeah, I have disappointment in myself for not being there for my guys.

"Do I regret standing up for what I believe in? Absolutely not. Do I regret saying business should not be first before winning? Absolutely not."

Sale is 14-3 with a 3.18 ERA this year. There is a possibility he could be traded before the Aug. 1 non-waiver deadline, but Sale told MLB.com he doesn't want to be dealt. It would take quite an offer to get the White Sox to move him.

Ventura also announced that right-hander Anthony Ranaudo, who was promoted from Triple-A Charlotte on Sunday to take Sale's spot on the roster, will start Wednesday against the Cubs. Right-hander Jacob Turner, who allowed four runs and five hits in 3 1/3 innings in his last start Friday against Detroit, will move to the bullpen.

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AP Baseball Writer Ronald Blum and AP freelance reporter Mike Cranston contributed to this report.

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Jay Cohen can be reached at http://www.twitter.com/jcohenap

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Cubs get closer Aroldis Chapman in trade with Yankees http://www.dailyastorian.com/cubs-get-closer-aroldis-chapman-in-trade-with-yankees-da-ap-webfeeds-news-pro-sports6988c08848e848078409c31948a66223 http://www.dailyastorian.com/cubs-get-closer-aroldis-chapman-in-trade-with-yankees-da-ap-webfeeds-news-pro-sports6988c08848e848078409c31948a66223#Comments Mon, 25 Jul 2016 22:21:19 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016307259698 CHICAGO (AP) — Before the Chicago Cubs completed a trade for Aroldis Chapman, owner Tom Ricketts and president of baseball operations Theo Epstein decided they had to hear from the closer himself about a domestic violence allegation in the offseason.

So Ricketts and Epstein asked Major League Baseball for a window to speak with the left-hander, and they got him on the phone Monday. When the conversation was over, the blockbuster deal was on.

Chasing their first World Series title since 1908, the Cubs addressed one of their few weaknesses by sending a pricey package of four players to the New York Yankees for Chapman, one of the most dominant relievers in the game, but one who also comes with some risk for a franchise riding a positive wave.

"This is a game-changer. Aroldis Chapman is a game-changing-type pitcher in the postseason," Epstein said. "As you sit around and game plan how you're going to win a big game or how you're going to win a postseason game, it makes it look a lot easier when you see him there on your lineup card."

Chapman is expected to join the Cubs for Tuesday night's game at the crosstown White Sox.

For the Yankees, it was a rare July trade that saw the best player in the deal leaving New York. But Chapman is eligible for free agency after this season, New York also has All-Stars Andrew Miller and Dellin Betances in the bullpen, and its haul included top shortstop prospect Gleyber Torres, versatile pitcher Adam Warren and minor league outfielders Billy McKinney and Rashad Crawford.

"This was an easy call, and this was the right call," general manager Brian Cashman said. "Easy because we traded from an area of strength and we are excited about the players that we've received for someone that obviously was only under control for two more months."

The Yankees (51-48) are three games over .500 for the first time this season, but they still face long odds of getting to the playoffs. They made the decision to trade Chapman after his agents said he would not agree to a new contract that would start in 2017, a person familiar with the talks said. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because no public statement on those talks was authorized.

If New York slips back any further, it could engage in a rare sell-off for the franchise. Miller, signed through 2018, also could be traded. All-Star outfielder Carlos Beltran, first baseman Mark Teixeira and pitcher Ivan Nova are eligible for free agency after the season and could be sought by contenders.

"I think that when the right buy-or-sell circumstance presents itself, then this department will be making recommendations to ownership and then they will direct me on what they want," Cashman said.

The 28-year-old Chapman went 3-0 with a 2.01 ERA and 20 saves in 31 games for New York. He threw a 105.1 mph fastball to Baltimore's J.J. Hardy last week, matching the fastest since Major League Baseball began tracking speeds in 2008.

With lefty-batting sluggers Bryce Harper of Washington and Brandon Belt of San Francisco possibly looming in the playoffs, the addition of Chapman gives Cubs manager Joe Maddon one of the majors' top assets when in need of a late strikeout.

"The Cubs have been playing really good baseball," Chapman said through a translator before he left Houston to travel to Chicago. "I think they're probably one of the better teams in both leagues right now. They have a good rhythm right now. They're fighting to get that ring, so it might be a good experience for me to be there."

Chapman, who threw the 62 fastest pitches in the majors last season, was traded from Cincinnati to New York last December after a deal with the Los Angeles Dodgers fell through when it was learned Florida police investigated an accusation of domestic violence involving the Cuban pitcher.

Prosecutors declined to file charges, citing conflicting accounts, and Chapman was suspended for the first 29 games of the season, losing $1,856,557 of his $11,325,000 salary. He was the first player penalized a finite number of games under Major League Baseball's domestic violence policy.

"I regret that I did not exercise better judgment and for that I am truly sorry," Chapman said Monday in a statement released by the NL Central-leading Cubs. "Looking back, I feel I have learned from this matter and have grown as a person. My girlfriend and I have worked hard to strengthen our relationship, to raise our daughter together, and would appreciate the opportunity to move forward without revisiting an event we consider part of our past."

Epstein said the club thoroughly investigated the situation. But it wasn't until they spoke with Chapman on Monday that they were ready to complete the deal.

"There was genuine sorrow, regret," Epstein said before Monday night's 5-4 loss to the White Sox. "He's open about the fact that he's learned from the incident and that he feels he's grown as a person and will continue to grow as a person and that was important to us."

Asked if the Cubs spoke with Chapman's girlfriend or someone close to her, Epstein said they "took efforts" to make sure they looked at the issue from every possible side.

Warren was drafted by New York and made his major league debut with the Yankees in 2012. He was traded to Chicago in the December deal that moved infielder Starlin Castro from the Cubs to the Yankees.

But the centerpiece of the Yankees' package is the 19-year-old Torres, one of the top infield prospects in baseball.

"We're disappointed we swung and missed in our efforts to sign him as an international free agent back in the 2013 class, but certainly you keep your eyes on players you've liked in the past and he was definitely a target for us," Cashman said.

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AP Baseball Writer Ronald Blum in New York and AP Sports Writer Kristie Rieken in Houston contributed to this report.

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Jay Cohen can be reached at http://www.twitter.com/jcohenap

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Celebrity birthdays for the week of July 31-Aug. 6 http://www.dailyastorian.com/celebrity-birthdays-for-the-week-of-july-31-aug-6-da-ap-webfeeds-news-entertainmentd300828d50754ccfb3e28f8f41cddb42 http://www.dailyastorian.com/celebrity-birthdays-for-the-week-of-july-31-aug-6-da-ap-webfeeds-news-entertainmentd300828d50754ccfb3e28f8f41cddb42#Comments Mon, 25 Jul 2016 22:10:29 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016306289916 July 31: Actor Don Murray is 87. Jazz guitarist Kenny Burrell is 85. Actress Susan Flannery ("Bold and the Beautiful") is 77. Actress France Nuyen ("South Pacific") is 77. Singer Lobo is 73. Singer Gary Lewis of Gary Lewis and the Playboys is 71. Singer-guitarist Daniel Ash (Love and Rockets, Bauhaus) is 59. Actor Dirk Blocker ("Brooklyn Nine-Nine") is 59. Drummer Bill Berry (R.E.M.) is 58. Actor Wesley Snipes is 54. Country singer Chad Brock is 53. Musician Fatboy Slim is 53. Guitarist Jim Corr of The Corrs is 52. "Harry Potter" author J.K. Rowling is 51. Actor Dean Cain is 50. Actor Jim True-Frost ("American Odyssey," ''The Wire") is 50. Actress Eve Best ("Nurse Jackie") is 45. Actor Robert Telfer ("Saved by the Bell") is 39. Country singer Zac Brown of Zac Brown Band is 38. Actor B.J. Novak ("The Office") is 37. Actor Rico Rodriguez ("Modern Family") is 18.

Aug. 1: Singer Ramblin' Jack Elliott is 85. Blues musician Robert Cray is 63. Singer Joe Elliott of Def Leppard is 57. Rapper Chuck D of Public Enemy is 56. Guitarist Suzi Gardner of L7 is 56. Rapper Coolio is 53. Singer Adam Duritz of Counting Crows is 52. Guitarist Charlie Kelley (Buffalo Club) is 48. Actress Tempestt Bledsoe ("The Cosby Show") is 43. Actor Jason Momoa ("Game of Thrones") is 37. Singer Ashley Parker Angel (O-Town) is 35.

Aug. 2: Keyboardist Garth Hudson of The Band is 79. Actor Max Wright ("Alf," ''Norm") is 73. Actress Joanna Cassidy is 71. Actress Kathryn Harrold is 66. Actor Butch Patrick ("The Munsters") is 63. Music producer and Garbage drummer Butch Vig is 61. Singer Mojo Nixon is 59. Actress Victoria Jackson is 57. Actress Apollonia is 57. Actress Cynthia Stevenson ("Men in Trees," ''Hope and Gloria") is 54. Actress Mary-Louise Parker is 52. Director-actor Kevin Smith ("Clerks," ''Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back") is 46. Actor Sam Worthington ("Terminator Salvation") is 40. Actor Edward Furlong is 39. Singer Charli XCX is 24. Actress Hallie Eisenberg is 24.

Aug. 3: Singer Tony Bennett is 90. Actor Martin Sheen is 76. Singer Beverly Lee of The Shirelles is 75. Lifestyle guru Martha Stewart is 75. Bassist B.B. Dickerson of War is 67. Movie director John Landis is 66. Actor Jay North ("Dennis the Menace") is 65. Guitarist Randy Scruggs is 63. Actor John C. McGinley ("Scrubs") is 57. Bassist Lee Rocker (Stray Cats) is 55. Singer-guitarist James Hetfield of Metallica is 53. Singer Ed Roland of Collective Soul is 53. Actor Isaiah Washington ("Grey's Anatomy," ''Soul Food") is 53. Keyboardist Dean Sams of Lonestar is 50. Guitarist Stephen Carpenter of Deftones is 46. Musician Spinderella of Salt-N-Pepa is 45. Actor Michael Ealy ("Think Like a Man," ''Barbershop") is 43. Violinist Jimmy De Martini of Zac Brown Band is 40. Actress Evangeline Lilly ("Lost") is 37. Singer Holly Arnstein of Dream is 31. Actress Georgina Haig ("Once Upon a Time") is 31. Bassist Brent Kutzle of OneRepublic is 31.

Aug. 4: Actor-comedian Richard Belzer ("Law and Order: Special Victims Unit," ''Homicide") is 72. Actor Billy Bob Thornton is 61. Drummer Rob Cieka of Boo Radleys is 48. Actor Daniel Dae Kim ("Hawaii Five-O," ''Lost") is 48. Rapper Yo-Yo ("Miss Rap Supreme") is 45. Singer-actor Marques Houston of Immature is 35. Singer Tom Parker of The Wanted is 28. Actors Dylan and Cole Sprouse ("Big Daddy," ''Grace Under Fire") are 24.

Aug. 5: Actress Loni Anderson is 71. Actress Erica Slezak ("One Life to Live") is 70. Singer Rick Derringer is 69. Guitarist Eddie Ojeda of Twisted Sister is 61. Actress Maureen McCormick ("The Brady Bunch") is 60. Guitarist Pat Smear (Foo Fighters) is 57. Actor Mark Strong ("The Imitation Game") is 53. Actor Jonathan Silverman ("The Single Guy") is 50. Country singer Terri Clark is 48. Cellist Eicca Toppinen of Apocalyptica is 41. Drummer Will Sellers of Old Dominion is 38. Actor Jesse Williams ("Grey's Anatomy") is 36. Actor Albert Tsai ("Dr. Ken") is 12.

Aug. 6: Actor-director Peter Bonerz is 78. Actress Louise Sorel ("Days of Our Lives") is 76. Actress Catherine Hicks ("Seventh Heaven") is 65. Singer Pat MacDonald of Timbuk 3 is 64. Actress Stepfanie Kramer is 60. Actress Faith Prince is 59. Singer Randy DeBarge of DeBarge is 58. Actress Michelle Yeoh ("Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon") is 54. Country singers Peggy and Patsy Lynn of The Lynns are 52. Actor Jeremy Ratchford ("Cold Case") is 51. Country singer Lisa Stewart is 48. Writer-director M. Night Shyamalan ("The Sixth Sense") is 46. Singer Geri Halliwell (Spice Girls) is 44. Actor Jason O'Mara ("Life on Mars") is 44. Actress Vera Farmiga is 43. Actress Melissa George ("Alias," ''Grey's Anatomy") is 40. Singer Travis McCoy of Gym Class Heroes is 35. Actor Leslie Odom Jr. (stage: "Hamilton," TV: "Smash") is 35. Bassist Eric Roberts of Gym Class Heroes is 32.

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Cubs get closer Aroldis Chapman in trade with Yankees http://www.dailyastorian.com/cubs-get-closer-aroldis-chapman-in-trade-with-yankees-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world6988c08848e848078409c31948a66223 http://www.dailyastorian.com/cubs-get-closer-aroldis-chapman-in-trade-with-yankees-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world6988c08848e848078409c31948a66223#Comments Mon, 25 Jul 2016 21:40:49 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016307259684 CHICAGO (AP) — Before the Chicago Cubs completed a trade for Aroldis Chapman, owner Tom Ricketts and president of baseball operations Theo Epstein decided they had to hear from the closer himself about a domestic violence allegation in the offseason.

So Ricketts and Epstein asked Major League Baseball for a window to speak with the left-hander, and they got him on the phone Monday. When the conversation was over, the blockbuster deal was on.

Chasing their first World Series title since 1908, the Cubs addressed one of their few weaknesses by sending a pricey package of four players to the New York Yankees for Chapman, one of the most dominant relievers in the game, but one who also comes with some risk for a franchise riding a positive wave.

"This is a game-changer. Aroldis Chapman is a game-changing-type pitcher in the postseason," Epstein said. "As you sit around and game plan how you're going to win a big game or how you're going to win a postseason game, it makes it look a lot easier when you see him there on your lineup card."

Chapman is expected to join the Cubs for Tuesday night's game at the crosstown White Sox.

For the Yankees, it was a rare July trade that saw the best player in the deal leaving New York. But Chapman is eligible for free agency after this season, New York also has All-Stars Andrew Miller and Dellin Betances in the bullpen, and its haul included top shortstop prospect Gleyber Torres, versatile pitcher Adam Warren and minor league outfielders Billy McKinney and Rashad Crawford.

"This was an easy call, and this was the right call," general manager Brian Cashman said. "Easy because we traded from an area of strength and we are excited about the players that we've received for someone that obviously was only under control for two more months."

The Yankees had won six of eight heading into Monday night's game at Houston, but they still face long odds of getting to the playoffs. They made the decision to trade Chapman after his agents said he would not agree to a new contract that would start in 2017, a person familiar with the talks said. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because no public statement on those talks was authorized.

If New York slips back any further, it could engage in a rare sell-off for the franchise. Miller, signed through 2018, also could be traded. All-Star outfielder Carlos Beltran, first baseman Mark Teixeira and pitcher Ivan Nova are eligible for free agency after the season and could be sought by contenders.

"I think that when the right buy-or-sell circumstance presents itself, then this department will be making recommendations to ownership and then they will direct me on what they want," Cashman said.

The 28-year-old Chapman went 3-0 with a 2.01 ERA and 20 saves in 31 games for New York. He threw a 105.1 mph fastball to Baltimore's J.J. Hardy last week, matching the fastest since Major League Baseball began tracking speeds in 2008.

With lefty-batting sluggers Bryce Harper of Washington and Brandon Belt of San Francisco possibly looming in the playoffs, the addition of Chapman gives Cubs manager Joe Maddon one of the majors' top assets when in need of a late strikeout.

"The Cubs have been playing really good baseball," Chapman said through a translator before he left Houston to travel to Chicago. "I think they're probably one of the better teams in both leagues right now. They have a good rhythm right now. They're fighting to get that ring, so it might be a good experience for me to be there."

Chapman, who threw the 62 fastest pitches in the majors last season, was traded from Cincinnati to New York last December after a deal with the Los Angeles Dodgers fell through when it was learned Florida police investigated an accusation of domestic violence involving the Cuban pitcher.

Prosecutors declined to file charges, citing conflicting accounts, and Chapman was suspended for the first 29 games of the season, losing $1,856,557 of his $11,325,000 salary. He was the first player penalized a finite number of games under Major League Baseball's domestic violence policy.

"I regret that I did not exercise better judgment and for that I am truly sorry," Chapman said Monday in a statement released by the NL Central-leading Cubs. "Looking back, I feel I have learned from this matter and have grown as a person. My girlfriend and I have worked hard to strengthen our relationship, to raise our daughter together, and would appreciate the opportunity to move forward without revisiting an event we consider part of our past."

Epstein said the club thoroughly investigated the situation. But it wasn't until they spoke with Chapman on Monday that they were ready to complete the deal.

"There was genuine sorrow, regret," Epstein said. "He's open about the fact that he's learned from the incident and that he feels he's grown as a person and will continue to grow as a person and that was important to us."

Asked if the Cubs spoke with Chapman's girlfriend or someone close to her, Epstein said they "took efforts" to make sure they looked at the issue from every possible side.

Warren was drafted by New York and made his major league debut with the Yankees in 2012. He was traded to Chicago in the December deal that moved infielder Starlin Castro from the Cubs to the Yankees.

But the centerpiece of the Yankees' package is the 19-year-old Torres, one of the top infield prospects in baseball.

"We're disappointed we swung and missed in our efforts to sign him as an international free agent back in the 2013 class, but certainly you keep your eyes on players you've liked in the past and he was definitely a target for us," Cashman said.

___

AP Baseball Writer Ronald Blum in New York and AP Sports Writer Kristie Rieken in Houston contributed to this report.

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Jay Cohen can be reached at http://www.twitter.com/jcohenap

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After turmoil, Sanders, Mrs. Obama, Warren thrill convention http://www.dailyastorian.com/after-turmoil-sanders-mrs-obama-warren-thrill-convention-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world45a30889ac464f01ac02a47a3bb4b073 http://www.dailyastorian.com/after-turmoil-sanders-mrs-obama-warren-thrill-convention-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world45a30889ac464f01ac02a47a3bb4b073#Comments Mon, 25 Jul 2016 21:40:17 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016307259890 PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Seeking to bridge deep Democratic divides, Bernie Sanders robustly embraced his former rival Hillary Clinton Monday night as a champion for the same economic causes that enlivened his supporters, signaling it was time for them, too, to rally behind her in the campaign against Republican Donald Trump.

"Any objective observer will conclude that — based on her ideas and her leadership — Hillary Clinton must become the next president of the United States," he declared in a headlining address on the opening night of the Democratic convention.

Sanders joined a high-wattage lineup of speakers, including first lady Michelle Obama who made a forceful, impassioned case for the Democratic nominee. Mrs. Obama's address all but wiped away earlier tumult in the convention hall that had exposed lingering tensions between Clinton and Sanders supporters.

Mrs. Obama, who has spent nearly eight years in the White House avoiding political fights, took numerous swipes at Trump, all while avoiding mentioning him by name.

"This election and every election is about who will have the power to shape our children for the next four or eight years of their lives," she said. "There is only one person I trust with that responsibility, only one person I believe is truly qualified to be president of the United States, and that is Hillary Clinton."

While Sanders had endorsed Clinton previously, his remarks Monday marked his most vigorous and detailed praise of her qualifications for the presidency. It came at a crucial moment for Clinton's campaign, on the heels of leaked emails suggesting the party had favored the former secretary of state through the primaries despite a vow of neutrality.

Sanders scored the resignation of party chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz, a nemesis in the primaries, but that wasn't enough to quell the anger of supporters. As the convention opened, they still erupted in chants of "Bernie" and booed Clinton the first several times her name was mentioned. Outside the convention hall, several hundred marched down Philadelphia's sweltering streets with signs carrying messages such as "Never Hillary."

Behind the scenes, Sanders and Clinton aides joined forces to try to ease tensions. Clinton's campaign quickly added more Sanders' supporters to the speakers lineup. Sanders sent urgent messages to supporters asking them not to protest.

By the time Sanders took the stage for the night's closing address, much of the anger had been overshadowed by speeches promoting party unity. Sanders did his part, imploring his supporters to consider a country under Trump's leadership.

"If you don't believe this election is important, if you think you can sit it out, take a moment to think about the Supreme Court justices that Donald Trump would nominate and what that would mean to civil liberties, equal rights and the future of our country," he said.

President Bill Clinton, watching from the audience, leapt to his feet and applauded, as did most of the delegates filling the convention arena.

Sanders spoke just after Massachusetts. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a favorite of liberals who has emerged as one of the Democrats' toughest critics of Trump.

"Donald Trump has no real plans for jobs, for college kids, for seniors," she said in the keynote address. "No plans to make anything great for anyone except rich guys like Donald Trump."

Mrs. Obama was one of the night's standouts. While she has often avoided overt politics during her nearly eight years in the White House, her frustration with Trump's rise was evident. She warned that the White House couldn't be in the hands of someone with "a thin skin or a tendency to lash out" or someone who tells voters the country can be great again.

"This right now, is the greatest country on earth," she said.

Clinton's campaign hoped the nighttime line-up would overshadow a tumultuous start to the four-day convention. The hacked DNC emails fed the suspicion of Sanders' supporters and sapped Clinton's campaign of some of its energy following a well-received rollout Saturday of her running mate, Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine.

Campaigning in North Carolina, Trump seemed to revel in the Democrats' commotion, telling supporters that Clinton made a mistake by not choosing a more liberal running mate to appease Sanders' base. "Crazy Bernie's going crazy right now," he said.

But in Philadelphia, Delegates waved "Love Trumps Hate" signs and cheered as immigration supporters, gay rights advocates, and labor leaders took the stage.

Comedian-turned-Sen. Al Franken, a Clinton supporter, and actress Sarah Silverman, a Sanders supporter, made a joint appearance to promote party unity.

"I am proud to be part of Bernie's movement," Silverman said as the crowd roared. "And a vital part of that movement is making absolutely sure Hillary Clinton is our next president of the United States."

Trump was a frequent target throughout the night, though the jabs were often more mocking than mean. The tone was a sharp contrast to the Republican convention, where the attacks against Clinton was bitingly personal, including chants of "Lock her up."

Wasserman Schultz had planned to be among those taking the stage, despite the email hacking controversy. But she stepped aside, bowing to pressure from Democrats who feared the mere sight of her on stage would prompt strong opposition.

The outgoing chairwoman did watch the gathering from a private suite at the arena.

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Associated Press writers Kathleen Hennessey, Catherine Lucey, Kathleen Ronayne and Julie Bykowicz in Philadelphia, Lisa Lerer in Charlotte, North Carolina, contributed to this report.

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On Twitter follow Julie Pace at http://twitter.com/jpaceDC and Ken Thomas at http://twitter.com/kthomasdc

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With Turkey in turmoil, EU migrant deal back under fire http://www.dailyastorian.com/with-turkey-in-turmoil-eu-migrant-deal-back-under-fire-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world666d05b4c3da4c02bcd418fbc70495af http://www.dailyastorian.com/with-turkey-in-turmoil-eu-migrant-deal-back-under-fire-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world666d05b4c3da4c02bcd418fbc70495af#Comments Mon, 25 Jul 2016 21:21:03 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016307259639 ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Even before Turkey was thrown into crisis by a coup attempt, its deal with the European Union to stop migration westward was under strain: Turks did not get the visa-free travel they were promised, and Greece was overwhelmed with asylum claims that have halted deportations for weeks.

Now critics of the agreement argue Turkey is even more unsafe, and warn the arrangement might collapse altogether — heightening anxiety in neighboring Greece, the main gateway for migrants into the EU.

Amnesty International says it has gathered evidence that people who have been detained in President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's sweeping purge of suspected sympathizers of the attempted coup on July 15-16 are being beaten and tortured.

"With allegations of torture in detention, a crackdown on freedom of expression and a general roll back of rights, the EU cannot expect to outsource its refugee responsibilities to Turkey," the rights group's deputy Europe director Gauri van Gulik told the AP.

"Amnesty and other groups have already demonstrated Turkey is not a safe country to return refugees to. And the events of last week are only likely to exacerbate the situation."

More than a million migrants crossed into the continent last year, mostly from Turkey to nearby Greek islands. The number of arrivals fell dramatically after Ankara reached an agreement with the EU in March, sweetened with hefty financial support and promises to ease European travel restrictions for Turks. NATO was allowed to patrol the eastern Aegean, while migrants arriving after March 20 were detained for deportation.

Migration expert Brad Blitz said that as far sending refugees back, the deal is now probably doomed.

"Quite honestly, I don't see how anyone could claim that Turkey is a safe country. I didn't think it was a safe country beforehand in terms of returning people, but this (purge) is so blatant with thousands of people arrested and allegations of torture ... The situation there is so unstable that you might see Turkey journalists and academics coming across the Aegean with migrants," said Blitz, a professor of international politics at Middlesex University in London.

"It will put more pressure on Greece," he said.

More than 57,000 migrants are stranded in Greece, with 8,500 of them awaiting possible deportation on Lesbos, Chios and other islands facing Turkey. So far, fewer than 500 have been sent back, and none since mid-June as authorities remain bogged down by asylum applications.

According to government data, migrant arrivals have increased slightly to about 100 a day — roughly double the number seen in recent weeks, but still far lower that massive levels seen last fall when daily arrivals topped 3,000.

In past weeks, violence has repeatedly broken out at overcrowded deportation camps on the islands, where some locals have staged protests, angered by the effect of the crisis on tourism.

In Brussels, EU officials have said little about the prospects of the migration agreement.

EU Commission spokesman Margaritis Schinas told reporters Friday that "it goes without saying that the commission monitors the situation in Turkey."

"For the time being, we maintain our position. The guarantees (provided by Ankara) are valid," he said.

The upheaval in Turkey is likely to be felt in Greece in the next two months, argues Thanos Dokos, director of the Hellenic Foundation for European and Foreign Policy, an Athens-based think tank.

"Now we now have a chilling of relations between the EU and Turkey because of the purges and the debate about the death penalty and I suspect Mr. Erdogan will not be in any mood to make the life of EU countries easier when it comes to the refugee situation," Dokos said.

"So we might see in the next couple of months a return to the situation of late 2015 and early 2016 when larger numbers of people were crossing the Aegean every day. Saying larger numbers, I don't think we will go back to the 3,000 people per day."

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Becatoros reported from Istanbul, Turkey. Raf Casert in Brussels contributed. Follow them at http://www.twitter.com/dgatopoulos , http://www.twitter.com/ElenaBec and http://twitter.com/rcasert

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Mom of slain Florida teen warned son of nightclub shootings http://www.dailyastorian.com/mom-of-slain-florida-teen-warned-son-of-nightclub-shootings-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world64cec4857ebb4cbdadccc9ab2483fd3a http://www.dailyastorian.com/mom-of-slain-florida-teen-warned-son-of-nightclub-shootings-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world64cec4857ebb4cbdadccc9ab2483fd3a#Comments Mon, 25 Jul 2016 20:53:25 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016307259863 FORT MYERS, Fla. (AP) — With the Orlando massacre still fresh on everyone's mind, the mother of a young man who was slain at a nightclub early Monday had warned her son about what to do if there were a shooting: "hit the floor, find a table."

But when gunfire erupted at the Club Blu parking lot, 18-year-old Stef'an Strawder didn't have anywhere to hide. He was killed along with a 14-year-old boy, and 17 other people ranging in age from 12 to 27 were wounded during a swimsuit-themed party for teens.

"I told him to look for all the exits if any kind of shooting would go off, to hit the floor, find a table and get out of the way ... because I thought about the people in Orlando. That was a big thing," Strawder's mother, Stephanie White, told The Associated Press.

Since the shooting happened in the parking lot, "He didn't have that chance," she said.

Florida is again reeling from a mass shooting at a nightclub, but instead of being committed by an extremist spouting Islamist ideology, this rampage may have started with an argument over a rap performance. Police have not yet released a motive.

The shooting at a venue tucked in a strip mall also left 14-year-old Sean Archilles dead, and a state and its governor grappling with another tragedy. The massacre at Orlando's Pulse nightclub last month killed 49 and wounded dozens of others.

"The positive is we are at a 45-year low in our crime rate. The negatives - I can't imagine this happening to any person in our state. I don't want this to happen to anybody in my state. The 20 million people who live here, the probably 150 million people who visit here. We just want everybody to be safe," Gov. Rick Scott told reporters at a news conference in Fort Myers.

He said gun laws are not to blame. "The Second Amendment has never shot anybody. The evil did this."

Fort Myers interim Police Chief Dennis Eads said the shooting was not an act of terror. Police detained three people and were searching for others, he added. He declined to give a motive for the shooting or discuss details, saying the investigation is ongoing. Hours after the shooting, police had marked more than two dozen shell casings in the parking lot outside the club.

The shooting happened about 12:30 a.m. Monday, just as the club was closing and parents were picking up their children.

Security guard Brandy Mclaughlin, who was hired for the event, said she saw someone with a semi-automatic rifle open fire, with the attack sounding like "firecrackers." Her car was hit in the spray of bullets.

"The rapper was upset, someone not being able to perform," she said. "It wasn't targeted, terrorist or gays, or anything like that. It wasn't a black or white situation. It was an idiot. An idiot with a firearm."

Club owner Cheryl Filardi, who said she was in the back room when the shots rang out, said at least 10 security guards were hired for the party — two in the parking lot, one or two at the door and the rest floating inside.

She said the club has had four or five teen parties over the past half-dozen years, and this was the second one this summer. She said the parties are something positive for a rough and often-violent neighborhood.

"To be honest with you, every day someone's getting shot in this area. These days in Lee County, somebody's always shooting," Filardi said. "If we do teen parties, we always have a ton of security and we've never had a problem."

State records show this wasn't the first time violence had broken out at Club Blu.

Department of Business and Professional Regulation records show two separate shootings occurred just outside the club on the same night in May 2015. Two men were each shot in the leg but told police they did not want to press charges.

Although beer posters still hung in its windows, Club Blu's alcohol license was revoked June 7 because of issues related to its business records, regulators said.

There were bullet holes in concrete planters and wooden support beams outside the club. Sheriff's evidence markers were still affixed to the holes. The letter "A'' was attached near a post, while nearby "L," ''M," ''N" and "O'' were marked near a planter filled with scraggly foliage.

The youngest to die, Archilles, lived about a mile from the nightclub, and loved to play football and basketball, said his father, Jean Archilles.

"He liked to make people laugh. He's a funny kid. He's always joking," Jean Archilles said.

Strawder starred on the Lehigh High School basketball team, averaging more than 15 points a game as a junior.

His sister also was at the party and was shot in the leg. She's home from the hospital.

"She didn't know she was shot because she was looking for her brother."

All around the home in the Fort Myers suburb of Lehigh Acres were testaments to Strawder's athletic ability. From the baby photo of him with a football on his lap — a ball nearly as big as he was — to the photos of him over the years on the court, to the dozens of trophies lining the cabinets, it was clear that his family adored him and his abilities.

He was the kind of guy who, even if he didn't have much money, he'd pay for meals for teammates, his mother said.

White clutched photos of her son while sitting in a chair in her home. The television was on, loud, and turned to the local news. A story came on about the shootings.

"My son," said White, waving a hand at the television. "There's another picture of him."

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Kennedy report from Fort Lauderdale. Also contributing were Tamara Lush and Josh Replogle in Fort Myers; Jennifer Kay and Curt Anderson in Miami and Gary Fineout in Tallahassee.

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This story has corrected the hospital official's title to chief administrative officer, not CEO. It also has corrected the victim's first name to Stef'an, not Ste'fan, and notes that he, not Archilles, was a star on the high school basketball team.

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Die-hard Sanders' backers divided on backing Clinton http://www.dailyastorian.com/die-hard-sanders-backers-divided-on-backing-clinton-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world063aa8104e5344199dfdf2c911c393e6 http://www.dailyastorian.com/die-hard-sanders-backers-divided-on-backing-clinton-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world063aa8104e5344199dfdf2c911c393e6#Comments Mon, 25 Jul 2016 20:53:13 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016307259879 PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Bernie Sanders tried to calm tensions among his delegates Monday at the Democratic National Convention but some weren't in a listening mood, seething over a lengthy primary campaign and a damaging email disclosure.

Sanders' delegates chanted the Vermont senator's name during the start of the convention and booed lustily at early mentions of rival Hillary Clinton. When Sanders took the stage as the night's final speaker, he acknowledged that many of his supporters were disappointed. "I think it's fair to say that no one is more disappointed than I am," he said.

Drawing loud cheers throughout, Sanders offered a detailed comparison of Clinton and Republican Donald Trump on an array of policy issues, portraying the election as a simple choice.

"Hillary Clinton will make an outstanding president and I am proud to stand with her here tonight," he said.

Behind the scenes, Sanders and his campaign pleaded with his delegates not to disrupt the proceedings. In an email earlier in the day to delegates, he said the credibility of his movement would be "damaged by booing, turning of backs, walking out or other similar displays."

Yet many die-hard backers of Sanders they weren't ready to coalesce around Clinton's presidential bid despite his pleas.

Their frustration was on display a day after Democratic party chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz announced she would step down at the end of the convention. Sanders' loyalists heckled her at a Florida delegation breakfast and many expressed dismay that Clinton had given the Florida congresswoman the position of honorary chair of the campaign's "50-state program." She did not appear at the convention podium and later watched the proceedings from a private suite.

"I'm really annoyed," said Michigan delegate Bruce Fealk. "I want to support Bernie, but I also want to voice my displeasure with the Democratic Party."

Fealk said he viewed the emergence of hacked DNC emails, which suggested favoritism of Clinton, as a revelation and evidence of the party's disrespect for progressives. Others said they simply couldn't support Clinton.

"No, never, not in a million years, no. I wouldn't vote for her for dog catcher," said Melissa Arab, of Shelby Township, Michigan.

From the podium, however, some of Sanders' allies noted their progress in influencing the party's platform and moving to reduce the influence of superdelegates, party leaders and elected officials who help decide the nomination.

"I stand with my Democratic family in making sure we win this fall," said Maine lawmaker Diane Russell, a Sanders supporter. "We are all in this together and we will all have a voice in the Clinton administration."

Earlier, at a raucous meeting with his delegates, Sanders implored them to get behind Clinton and her running mate, Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine, and defeat Trump. But his appeals elicited a mix of boos and cheers, as delegates shouted, "We want Bernie!"

Sanders' appeal was enough for Deborah Adams, of Cheraw, South Carolina, who served as a whip for the 14 Sanders delegates from her state's delegation.

"I think every delegate should follow Senator Sanders' request," Adams said. "We've worked hard as a movement. It gives us a black eye if we don't control our emotions."

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Associated Press writers Kathleen Ronayne and Erica Werner contributed to this report.

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What political news is the world searching for on Google and talking about on Twitter? Find out via AP's Election Buzz interactive. http://elections.ap.org/buzz

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Mexico finds water tunnel under Pakal tomb in Palenque http://www.dailyastorian.com/mexico-finds-water-tunnel-under-pakal-tomb-in-palenque-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worldd9ff761a55414e42ab459e8671818733 http://www.dailyastorian.com/mexico-finds-water-tunnel-under-pakal-tomb-in-palenque-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worldd9ff761a55414e42ab459e8671818733#Comments Mon, 25 Jul 2016 20:40:19 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016307259731 MEXICO CITY (AP) — Archaeologists at the Mayan ruin site of Palenque said Monday they have discovered an underground water tunnel built under the Temple of Inscriptions, which houses the tomb of an ancient ruler named Pakal.

Archaeologist Arnoldo Gonzalez said researchers believe the tomb and pyramid were purposely built atop a spring between AD 683 and 702. The tunnel led water from under the funeral chamber out into the broad esplanade in front of the temple, thus giving Pakal's spirit a path to the underworld.

Attention has focused on the heavily carved stone sarcophagus in which Pakal was buried, and which some erroneously believe depict the Maya ruler seated at the controls of a spaceship.

But Gonzalez said carvings on a pair of stone ear plugs found in the grave say a god "will guide the dead toward the underworld, by submerging (them) into the water so they will be received there."

Pakal, in other words, didn't fly off into space; he went down the drain. "There is nothing to do with spaceships," Gonzalez said.

The tunnel, which connects to another, is made of stone and is about two feet (60 centimeters) wide and tall.

The director of archaeology for the National Institute of Anthropology and History, Pedro Sanchez Nava, said the theory makes sense in light of other pre-Hispanic peoples, such as those who lived at Teotihuacan, near Mexico City, where another water tunnel was found.

"In both cases there was a water current present," said Sanchez Nava. "There is this allegorical meaning for water ... where the cycle of life begins and ends."

The dig began in 2012, when researchers become concerned about underground anomalies detected with geo-radar under the area in front of the pyramid's steps.

Fearing a hole or geological fault that could cause the pyramid to settle or collapse, they dug at the spot — and uncovered three layers of carefully fitted stone covering the top of the tunnel.

Gonzalez said the same type of three-layered stone covering has been found in the floor of Pakal's tomb, within the pyramid.

He said there appears to be no shaft or connection between the tomb and the tunnel, but adds the conduit hasn't been fully explored yet because it is too small to crawl through.

Researchers had to send a robot with a camera down to view much of the underground horizontal shaft.

Francisco Estrada-Belli, an assistant professor of archaeology at Boston University who was not involved in the dig, wrote, "I believe that building a tomb over a canal certainly does fit with the belief that water and water bodies were entrances to the underworld."

"Several cases of temples (and the associated tombs) are known to be built over natural caves that may or may not have held water," Estrada-Belli wrote.

Author Erich von Daniken suggested in his 1968 book "Chariots of the Gods?" that Pakal's stance in the engraving on the stone sarcophagus lid resembled the position of astronauts and that he appeared to be seated in a contraption with flames coming out of it and controls.

Experts say that the "flames" are in fact depictions of the Maya's "World Tree" or "Tree of Life," whose roots were believed to reach into the underworld.

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The Latest: Russian diplomat scoffs at DNC hack allegations http://www.dailyastorian.com/the-latest-russian-diplomat-scoffs-at-dnc-hack-allegations-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world82f9f2ec87ee468085407de0008029c5 http://www.dailyastorian.com/the-latest-russian-diplomat-scoffs-at-dnc-hack-allegations-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world82f9f2ec87ee468085407de0008029c5#Comments Mon, 25 Jul 2016 20:51:20 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016307259840 PHILADELPHIA (AP) — The Latest on the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia (all times EDT):

11:27 p.m.

Russia's top diplomat is declining to fully comment on allegations that Russia was behind the hack of Democratic National Committee emails.

Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov (SEHR'-gay LAHV'-rahf) is suggesting a proper response would involve vulgar language.

Lavrov was about the allegations as he began a meeting on Tuesday in Laos with Secretary of State John Kerry.

Lavrov answered in English: "Well, I don't want to use four-letter words."

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11:25 p.m.

Bernie Sanders says Hillary Clinton will make — in his words — "an outstanding president."

Sanders, who battled Clinton in the Democratic primaries, says he's known Clinton since she was first lady almost a quarter-century ago.

He credits Clinton with leading the fight for universal health care. He says Clinton, as a senator, was a "fierce advocate" for children's rights.

And Sanders is ending his speech at the Democratic National Convention by saying: "I am proud to stand with her tonight."

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11:23 p.m.

Many of Bernie Sanders' have disrupted the Democratic National Convention on Monday.

But the Vermont senator says he's going to "do all that I can" to ensure a Hillary Clinton presidency, along with a Democratic Senate and a Democratic House of Representatives.

Both chambers of Congress are now held by Republicans.

He said that "it is no secret that Hillary Clinton and I disagree on a number of issues" and that is what democracy is about.

But he said the two campaigns have produced together what is "by far, most progressive platform in the history of the Democratic party."

He said the platform calls for several of his priorities, including opposition to the Trans Pacific Partnership trade agreement.

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11:20 p.m.

Bernie Sanders says the presidential election should be about bringing people together, "not dividing us up."

He says presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton understands that diversity is one of her party's greatest strengths.

Sanders says in his speech at the Democratic National Convention that the United States becomes stronger when "black and white, Latino, Asian-American, Native American — when all of us stand together."

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11:10 p.m.

Bernie Sanders says the country has made much progress under President Barack Obama but there's more work to be done.

He says the 2016 presidential election is about the candidate who understands the "real problems" the country is facing and can offer solutions.

Sanders tells the Democratic National Convention that "by these measures, any objective observer will conclude that — based on her ideas and her leadership — Hillary Clinton must become the next president of the United States. The choice is not even close."

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10:50 p.m.

Bernie Sanders says no one is more disappointed than he is over not being the Democratic presidential nominee.

But the Vermont senator is urging his supporters to take "enormous pride" in the political revolution to transform America that they've started.

Sanders says in his speech at the Democratic National Convention that election days come and go.

But, he says, "the struggle of the people to create a government which represents all of us and not just the 1 percent - a government based on the principles economic, social, racial and environmental justice - that struggle continues."

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10:45 p.m.

Bernie Sanders is thanking his supporters and political donors whose contributions averaged what he says were $27 apiece.

Sanders is telling the Democratic National Convention that he's looking forward to receiving his 1,900 delegates' votes during Tuesday night's roll call.

The Vermont senator is underscoring his tough campaign against Hillary Clinton by recounting that he received 13 million votes, 46 percent of the total cast in Democratic primaries and caucuses.

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10:45 p.m.

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren says Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has excited Americans who are rightfully angry. But she says he's offering no solutions for their problems.

She tells the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia that Trump can see voter anger "from the top of Trump Tower" and tells voters that "he and he alone can fixed the rigged system."

Warren says the only actual clear policy proposal Trump offered in his own nomination acceptance last week was "a stupid wall" that "will never get built." Trump wants to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

But she says there was nothing in his speech about improving children's education, increasing incomes or creating

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10:43 p.m.

Elizabeth Warren is taking aim at Donald Trump's business record, and she says he's never "lifted a finger to help working people."

The Massachusetts senator is using her speech at the Democratic National Convention to highlight Trump's comments about benefiting from the 2008 housing crash — and she's noting his business bankruptcies.

Warren is asking: "What kind of a man acts like this? What kind of a man roots for an economic crash?"

She adds, "What kind of a man cheats students, cheats investors, cheats workers? A man who must never be president of the United States."

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10:40 p.m.

Elizabeth Warren is offering a harsh assessment of an American economy that she says is tilted against working people.

The liberal favorite and Massachusetts senator says "there's lots of wealth in America" but "it isn't trickling down to families like yours."

Instead, she tells delegates at the Democratic National Convention on Monday night, the "system is rigged" as "Americans bust their tails" while "wages stay flat."

Warren rejects those who say such an economy is a result of a Congress that isn't working. She says Congress works fine when corporations and the wealthy seek tax breaks and favorable regulations.

But she says, "try to do something for working people," and the "gridlock" ensues.

Warren says GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump's "whole life has been about taking advantage of that rigged system."

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10:30 p.m.

Elizabeth Warren says the choice in the presidential election is clear, and she says Republican nominee Donald Trump "cares about himself every minute of every day."

The Massachusetts senator is a favorite among liberals, and she's speaking at the Democrat National Convention on Monday night as the party tries to unite around Hillary Clinton after a divisive primary.

Warren tells the crowd: "I'm with Hillary. This choice is personal. It's about who we are as a people."

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10:20 p.m.

Michelle Obama says she wants a president who knows issues "cannot be boiled down to 140 characters."

Once again she's not mentioning Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump by name in her speech at the Democratic National Convention.

But she is citing his penchant for communicating on Twitter and says she wants someone who understands that issues aren't always clear.

And, she adds, "That's why in this election. I'm with her."

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10:15 p.m.

Michelle Obama says Hillary Clinton is advancing the cause for women so "all our sons and daughters now take for granted that a woman can be president of the United States."

The first lady also is linking Clinton's quest to be the first woman elected president and Barack Obama's historic tenure in the White as the first black president.

Michelle Obama recalls the history of black Americans who "felt the lash of bondage" and the "sting of segregation."

Michelle Obama says that now, she gets to "watch my daughters, two intelligent black young women, play with their dog on the White House lawn."

The first lady also is pushing back on Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's slogan to "make America great again."

She says, "Don't let anyone ever tell you that this country isn't great. That somehow we need to make it great again. Because this right now is the greatest country on earth."

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10:12 p.m.

California delegates backing Bernie Sanders are sitting still as Michelle Obama speaks at the Democratic National Convention, rather than starting chants as they did over other speakers.

Several yelled "no" when the first lady declared "I'm with her," a slogan for Clinton backers.

But the response is far more muted than the backlash that greeted other speakers. The California delegation has been one of the loudest on Monday night in expressing their opposition to Clinton.

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10:10 p.m.

Michelle Obama is offering an unequivocal endorsement for Hillary Clinton.

The first lady says Clinton — a former secretary of state, senator and first lady herself — is the "one person who I truly believe is qualified to be president of the United States."

Michelle Obama says in her speech at the Democratic National Convention that Clinton "never buckles under pressure." She says Clinton would be the kind of president that she wants for her own daughters.

Michelle Obama notes Clinton's reaction to her 2008 Democratic primary loss t Barack Obama. Michelle Obama says Clinton "didn't get angry or disillusioned" and "did not pack up and go home."

She says Clinton has "never quit on anything in her life."

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10:05 p.m.

Michelle Obama is calling out Donald Trump in her remarks at the Democratic National Convention.

The first lady says that "when someone is cruel or acts like a bully, we don't stoop to their level."

She's not mentioning the Republican presidential nominee by name, but she's is decrying what she calls "hateful language." She says that goes against what she tries to teach her children.

Her message? She says, "When they go low, we go high."

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9:50 p.m.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump seems to be reveling in the drama at the Democratic National Convention as he campaigns with running mate Mike Pence.

"What a mess they have going," Trump tells supporters Monday night at a rally in North Carolina.

Trump says rival Hillary Clinton made a mistake by not choosing a more liberal running mate to appease Bernie Sanders' supporters.

Trump says: "Crazy Bernie's going crazy right now."

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9:40 p.m.

A warmup speaker at a Donald Trump rally is calling President Barack Obama a racist.

Mark Burns is a black pastor who often speaks at Trump events, and last week he had a prime-time speaking slot at the Republican National Convention.

Burns said at a Trump event in North Carolina on Monday that "President Obama is the racist."

Burns also says Democrats should be ashamed for inviting the mother of Michael Brown to speak at their convention.

Michael Brown was the unarmed black 18-year-old who was shot to death by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri.

Burns contends the invitation reaffirms that blacks should be afraid of police.

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9:25 p.m.

Comedian Sarah Silverman isn't mincing words in her message to die-hard Bernie Sanders supporters.

Here's what she says Monday night at the Democratic convention: "Can I just say to the Bernie or bust people, you're being ridiculous."

Silverman was one of a number of prominent entertainers who backed Sanders in the Democratic primary against Hillary Clinton. But Silverman is telling the crowd in Philadelphia — and a national television audience — that she plans to vote for Clinton.

The crowd broke into chants of "Bernie, Bernie," but Silverman quickly shot back with her quip.

As the crowd roared in applause, Minnesota Sen. Al Franken — standing next to Silverman — joked, "Listen to what you did."

Franken noted that because he was a Clinton backer and Silverman was with Sanders, they were forming a bridge.

"We're like a bridge over troubled water," he said, and they next went on to introduce singer Paul Simon.

___

9:10 p.m.

Al Franken went to Harvard University, but at the Democratic National Convention, he's claiming a degree from Trump University instead.

The former "Saturday Night Live" comedian — who's now a Minnesota senator — jokes that he's a "world-renowned expert on right-wing megalomaniacs: Rush Limbaugh, Bill O'Reilly and now, Donald Trump."

Franken adds: "Now a little about my qualifications. I got my doctorate in megalomaniac studies from Trump University."

Trump — the Republican presidential nominee — faces lawsuits accusing him of defrauding customers at the now-defunct Trump University, which sold real estate seminars.

Franken asked the crowd of delegates if they knew that "Trump University's School of Ripping People Off is ranked second in the nation, right behind Bernie Madoff University?"

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8:50 p.m.

Democrats at their national convention are going after Donald Trump's business record.

Sen. Bob Casey of Pennsylvania is questioning where the Republican presidential nominee's products were made.

Here's what Casey says: "Dress shirts - Bangladesh. Furniture - Turkey. Picture frames - India. Wine glasses - Slovenia. Neck ties - China."

He adds, "Why would Donald Trump make his products in every corner of the globe but not in Altoona, Erie or here in Philadelphia?"

And Sen. Kristen Gillibrand of New York recalls Trump's comments about U.S. wages being too high.

She says Democrat Hillary Clinton "knows that in the richest country in the world, it's unacceptable that a mom with two kids working full time still lives in poverty."

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8:40 p.m.

Debbie Wasserman Schultz is in the building.

The outgoing Democratic Party chairwoman is watching Monday's opening night of the national convention from a private suite at the Wells Fargo Arena in Philadelphia.

The Florida congresswoman's resignation from the party post will take effect Friday.

She stepped down after the release of hacked emails suggested staff at the Democratic National Committee favored Hillary Clinton over Bernie Sanders in party's presidential primaries.

Wasserman Schultz was heckled Monday morning when speaking to her home state's delegation at breakfast. She later decided against gaveling in the convention amid concerns she'd draw more ire from Sanders supporters.

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8:25 p.m.

Hillary Clinton was campaigning in Las Vegas earlier this year when she heard directly from a young girl who was worried because her parents are living in the United States illegally.

Now 11-year-old Karla Oritz has told her story to a national audience — from the stage at the Democratic National Convention.

Karla's an American citizen who appeared with her mother at the Philadelphia gathering. Karla says she worries about what might happen if she comes home and finds her house empty.

That conversation she had with Clinton in Las Vegas ended up as part of a television ad for the Clinton campaign.

Karla says she remember how Clinton called her brave. The youngster says she wants to grow up to be a lawyer, so that "I can help other families like us."

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8:15 p.m.

Liberal stalwart Elizabeth Warren is using her Democratic convention speech to make clear her view that Americans won't fall for Donald Trump's plan to fan what she calls "the flames of fear and hatred."

The Massachusetts Democrat says in excerpts of a speech she plans to deliver later Monday that the Republican presidential nominee is peddling an old story of "divide and conquer."

Warren says Trump thinks he can win votes "by turning neighbor against neighbor" and by persuading voters that the source of their problems is "people who don't look like you, or don't talk like or don't worship like you."

She says bankers, oil companies and giant corporations benefit "when we turn on each other."

Warren says a divided America can't "fight back against a rigged system." She says "the American people are not falling for" Trump's divisive rhetoric.

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8:05 p.m.

Cory Booker is calling for the Democratic party to unite around Hillary Clinton — and the Democratic senator from New Jersey says Clinton would be a champion for the poor as president.

Remarks of Booker's speech at the party's convention have come out before his remarks later Monday. He says Clinton would measure America's greatness not by the number of millionaires and billionaires, but by how few people are living in poverty.

Booker says the country doesn't always have to agree, but the U.S. can't became a place "where our highest aspiration is that we just tolerate each other."

Booker also champions debt-free college, which he says represents the best of the Democratic party.

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7:55 p.m.

Singer Demi Lovato is belting out her hit "Confident" at the Democratic National Convention.

Lovato performed for presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Iowa during the campaign, and she's one of the first bold-faced names to appear on the convention stage.

The convention opened with a performance from Boyz II Men. Paul Simon is set to perform later Monday, and delegates are set to hear from actress and activist Eva Longoria.

Before performing, Lovato told the crowd of delegates at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia that "like millions of Americans, I am living with mental illness."

She says, "But I am lucky. I had the resources and support to get treatment at a top facility." She says Hillary Clinton will help Americans in need of care get the treatment they require.

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6:50 p.m.

"I wouldn't vote for her for dog catcher."

That's the sentiment of a Bernie Sanders delegate when talking about whether she'd support Hillary Clinton.

"No, never in a million years" — Melissa Arab of Shelby Township, Michigan, is making abundantly clear.

She says she's going to work as hard as she can to make Sanders the Democratic nominee for president.

She says "that's what I'm pledged to do and that's what Bernie told me to do."

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5:50 p.m.

Bernie Sanders may have asked his supporters as a "personal courtesy" not to protest at the Democratic convention — but not everyone's willing to heed that request.

Michigan delegate Bruce Fealk says he understands Sanders' position and understands why the Vermont senator is making the request.

But Fealk also says: "I'm really annoyed. ... I haven't decided yet. I want to support Bernie, but I also want to voice my displeasure with the Democratic Party."

Fealk says he sees the hacked party emails as a revelation, and says they show the party's disrespect for progressives.

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5:25 p.m.

A Democratic official says Bernie Sanders' campaign has urgently reached out to Hillary Clinton's team to express concerns that tensions are still raw among Sanders delegates.

They're fuming about hacked party emails that already have led to the ouster of the head of the Democratic National Committee, Debbie Wasserman Schultz.

Aides to Clinton and Sanders have met in hopes of forming a plan to avoid excessive disruptions on the convention floor.

The Democratic official spoke on condition of anonymity in order to discuss the private discussions.

Sanders has sent out a text message and an email to delegates urging them not to engage in protests on the floor as a "personal courtesy" to him.

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Sarah Silverman: Bernie-or-bust Dems 'being ridiculous' http://www.dailyastorian.com/sarah-silverman-bernie-or-bust-dems-being-ridiculous-da-ap-webfeeds-news-entertainment514d8e74aa6444c290fb75fd02307738 http://www.dailyastorian.com/sarah-silverman-bernie-or-bust-dems-being-ridiculous-da-ap-webfeeds-news-entertainment514d8e74aa6444c290fb75fd02307738#Comments Mon, 25 Jul 2016 20:40:55 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016307259671 Comic Sarah Silverman joined Sen. Al Franken Monday night to urge Democratic National Convention delegates to unite — then stirred up Bernie Sanders die-hards with some choice words: "To the Bernie or bust people, you're being ridiculous."

As a Sanders supporter herself, Silverman said she would now vote for Hillary Clinton "with gusto" as she continues to be "inspired and moved to action by the ideals set forth by Bernie, who will never stop fighting for us."

She spoke on the convention's opening day just before Paul Simon stood at a microphone and crooned the Simon and Garfunkel classic "Bridge Over Troubled Water."

Singer Demi Lovato got personal at the podium, touching on her struggle with mental illness, including eating and bipolar disorders. She urged an end to the stigma of those afflicted and called on politicians to support better access to health care for all.

"Like millions of Americans, I am living with mental illness," the 23-year-old Lovato said. "But I am lucky. I had the resources and support to get treatment at a top facility. Unfortunately, too many Americans from all walks of life don't get help, whether they fear the stigma or cannot afford treatment." Lovato closed with a performance of her hit "Confident."

Actress Eva Longoria of "Desperate Housewives" trashed Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump for his statements on Mexican immigrants.

Longoria, a Latina from a small town in south Texas, said she is ninth-generation American from a place once owned by Mexico.

"My family never crossed a border. The border crossed us," she said, adding: "When Donald Trump calls us criminals and rapists, he is insulting American families. My father is not a criminal or rapist. In fact, he's a United States veteran."

Fans and fashionistas, meanwhile, waited patiently for the dress reveal of first lady Michelle Obama, who spoke late Monday night. She wore a bright blue, A-line, cap-sleeve custom dress from American designer Christian Siriano. It was made of silk crepe and included high-belt detailing.

Earlier Monday, Triumph the insulting, cigar-chomping puppet dog joined sweltering street protesters while actress Rosario Dawson urged Bernie Sanders supporters to "listen" to their man.

Actor and activist Danny Glover of the "Lethal Weapon" film franchise addressed the convention's black caucus, describing Trump as a fascist and urging caucus members to "listen to new voices that demand speaking truth to power."

Glover and actresses Shailene Woodley and Susan Sarandon joined more than 1,000 people for a climate rally, vowing to keep up the fight on environmental issues even though Sanders, their preferred presidential candidate, would not be in charge. Woodley urged Sanders supporters to remain calm and Sarandon thanked him for "igniting this spark."

Boyz II Men performed on the convention stage, while Grammy winner Alicia Keys, who founded a social justice organization called We Are Here, appeared on a panel on criminal justice reform and civil rights.

Asked about remarks Hillary Clinton made as first lady about urban gangs with "super-predators" — which she later walked back — Keys said: "It's obvious that that was a big mistake. ... If we can admit to our mistakes, that's the beginning, and the question is not only just admitting to the mistake but what are we going to do about it."

Looking ahead to Tuesday, actresses Lena Dunham of "Girls" and America Ferrera of "Superstore" were among the notables expected to attend a bash hosted by Glamour magazine.

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The Latest: Darby downgraded as Oahu cleans up sewage spills http://www.dailyastorian.com/the-latest-darby-downgraded-as-oahu-cleans-up-sewage-spills-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world46eadb1bae874a42a5cb9f7320142d5d http://www.dailyastorian.com/the-latest-darby-downgraded-as-oahu-cleans-up-sewage-spills-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world46eadb1bae874a42a5cb9f7320142d5d#Comments Mon, 25 Jul 2016 20:32:46 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016307259617 HONOLULU (AP) — The Latest on a tropical storm near Hawaii (all times local):

5:30 p.m.

The National Weather Service says a tropical depression has been downgraded to a remnant low as it moves further away from Hawaii.

As of late Monday afternoon, Post-Tropical Cyclone Darby was about 130 miles west (215 km) of the island of Kauai.

Meanwhile, city crews are dealing with at least nine sewage spills across Oahu caused by heavy rains. The spills include more than 1,000 gallons near Ala Moana Center and 42,000 gallons at the Kailua Wastewater Treatment Plant.

Brown-water advisories have been issued for coastal water off Oahu, the Big Island and Kauai from storm and flood runoff. Not all waters may be affected, but officials advise staying out of the water if it's brown.

___

5 p.m.

The Honolulu Fire Department says it responded to at least 79 weather-related incidents over the weekend while Hawaii contended with a tropical storm.

Capt. David Jenkins says the incidents include 59 water evacuations or flooded conditions.

Heavy rains also led to a series of sewage spills across Oahu, including more than 1,000 gallons near Ala Moana Center and 42,000 gallons at the Kailua Wastewater Treatment Plant.

Brown-water advisories have been issued for coastal water off Oahu, the Big Island and Kauai from storm and flood runoff. Not all waters may be affected, but officials advise staying out of the water if it's brown.

___

4:50 p.m.

City crews are busy dealing with at least nine sewage spills across Oahu because of heavy rains from Tropical Depression Darby.

Honolulu Department of Environmental Services spokesman Markus Owens says that's how many sewage spill reports the city received as of Monday afternoon.

The spills include more than 1,000 gallons near Ala Moana Center and 42,000 at the Kailua Wastewater Treatment Plant.

Brown-water advisories have been issued for coastal water off Oahu, the Big Island and Kauai from storm and flood runoff. Not all waters may be affected, but officials advise staying out of the water if it's brown.

Darby was downgraded Monday from a tropical storm, but it is still expected to bring 1 to 3 inches of additional rainfall over parts of the islands.

___

3 p.m.

City and state officials are busy dealing with a series of sewage spills across Oahu because of heavy rains from Tropical Depression Darby.

Watson Okubo, a supervisor with the state Department of Health's Clean Water Branch, says there have been six spills as of Monday.

He says the spills include more than 1,000 gallons near Ala Moana Center and 42,000 at the Kailua Wastewater Treatment Plant.

Brown-water advisories have been issued for coastal water off Oahu, the Big Island and Kauai from storm and flood runoff. Not all waters may be affected, but officials advise staying out of the water if it's brown.

Darby was downgraded Monday from a tropical storm, but it is still expected to bring 1 to 3 inches of additional rainfall over parts of the islands.

___

1:45 p.m.

The Hawaii Tourism Authority says it's "business as usual" for the islands as Tropical Depression Darby leaves the state.

The authority notes that all airports, highways and roads are open Monday. Parks statewide that were closed for safety reasons because of Tropical Storm Darby will be reopening Monday and throughout the week. Visitors are encouraged to check on the status of a park before planning an excursion.

Darby was downgraded Monday from a tropical storm, but it is still expected to bring 1 to 3 inches of additional rainfall over parts of the islands.

Brown water advisories have been issued for coastal water off Oahu, the Big Island and Kauai's Hanalei Bay from storm and flood runoff. Not all waters may be affected but officials advise staying out of the water if it's brown.

___

9:15 a.m.

The National Weather Service says Tropical Depression Darby is weakening as it moves away from Hawaii.

Darby was downgraded Monday from a tropical storm but is still expected to bring 1 to 3 inches of additional rainfall over parts of the islands.

Forecasters expect Darby to dissipate by Wednesday.

Heavy rains Sunday led to problems for motorists. A major portion of Honolulu's H-1 freeway was closed in both directions because of flooding. The freeway is now open in both directions, but some surface streets remain closed because of mud and debris.

Brown water advisories have been issued for Oahu and Big Island coastal water from storm and flood runoff. Not all waters may be affected but officials advise staying out of the water if it's brown

___

4:15 a.m.

Tropical storm warnings for Oahu and Kauai have been called off as the system moves away from Hawaii, but flash flood watches are still in effect.

The National Weather Service said early Monday that heavy rain is still a threat and surf on the two islands' eastern shores could reach up to 8 feet.

Officials say moderate to heavy downpours were occurring and flooding was expected to persist until the rain eases later in the morning.

Honolulu police had urged drivers to stay off roadways as some flooding occurred late Sunday on the H-1 Freeway and some other major thoroughfares.

Tropical Storm Darby, which is about 65 miles northwest of Lihue, Kauai, is expected to keep getting weaker and become a tropical depression later Monday.

The Kauai mayor's office says no road closures or damage have been reported.

___

11:45 p.m.

Heavy rains from a tropical storm passing near Hawaii caused driving woes on Oahu.

The National Weather Service had issued a flash flood warning for the island.

The Honolulu Police Department called on drivers to stay off many area roadways due to high waters.

The department said late Sunday that there was flooding and ponding on the H-1 Freeway and some other major thoroughfares.

According to KHON-TV, the Honolulu Fire Department said that as of 10 p.m. its crews had responded to dozens of weather-related incidents.

It said that those incidents included 59 calls for help for water evacuation due to flooded conditions.

Firefighters say 30 of those calls were from Kalihi and 10 from the Nuuanu area.

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More than 50 pro-Sanders demonstrators cited by police http://www.dailyastorian.com/more-than-50-pro-sanders-demonstrators-cited-by-police-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worldc7943abb2dff4a93a076f9e1675258cb http://www.dailyastorian.com/more-than-50-pro-sanders-demonstrators-cited-by-police-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worldc7943abb2dff4a93a076f9e1675258cb#Comments Mon, 25 Jul 2016 20:51:23 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016307259929 PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Police briefly detained more than 50 people after they tried to storm the barricades outside the Democratic National Convention on Monday in a show of anger over Bernie Sanders' treatment by party leaders, even as he urged his supporters to fall in line behind Hillary Clinton.

Several hundred Sanders supporters and other demonstrators converged in the sweltering heat on Broad Street and made their way 4 miles to the convention site as the gathering was being gaveled to order, chanting "Nominate Sanders or lose in November!" and "Hey, hey, ho, ho, the DNC has got to go!" They carried signs reading, "Never Hillary," ''Just Go to Jail Hillary" and "You Lost Me at Hillary."

As tensions mounted outside the Wells Fargo Center, police moved metal fences into place and closed the nearest subway station to arriving trains. Fifty-five people were issued citations for disorderly conduct when protesters tried to climb over police barricades at the edge of the security zone surrounding the convention, police said.

The anger reflected the widening rift inside the Democratic Party and the convention hall between Sanders' supporters and Clinton's. Debbie Wasserman Schultz resigned as Democratic Party chairwoman on Sunday over leaked emails suggesting the supposedly neutral Democratic National Committee played favorites during the primaries by siding with Clinton and bad-mouthing Sanders.

Addressing the convention Monday night, Sanders urged his supporters to vote for Clinton, generating a chorus of boos and chants of, "Bernie! Bernie!"

"Based on her ideas and her leadership, Hillary Clinton must become the next president of the United States," Sanders said. "The choice is not even close."

The protests took shape amid a punishing heatwave, with oppressive humidity and temperatures in the mid-90s. Heavy rain and thunderstorms rolled through the area Monday evening, scattering most of the protesters. Forty-one people were treated for heat-related issues or other injuries, including from falls, during protests, fire officials said.

Protester Destine Madu, of Maplewood, New Jersey, said it doesn't matter if Sanders, a Vermont U.S. senator, is calling on his backers to support Clinton.

"He's like a Moses," she said. "He led us to the promised land."

The citations capped a day of demonstrations around the city on the opening day of the convention, at which Clinton is expected to receive the party's nomination for president.

About 100 Sanders supporters made their way into Philadelphia by marching across the Ben Franklin Bridge from Camden, New Jersey. Among them was Jim Glidden, a salesman from Batavia, New York. He carried a big sign saying the DNC stands for "Dishonest Nefarious Corrupt."

"Only one guy is telling the truth out there," he said, referring to Sanders. "And the DNC shut him up with lies and cheating."

Another participant in the bridge march, Deborah Armstrong, of Spokane, Washington, said she and her husband went bankrupt because of his health problems, which required a heart transplant.

"I'm Bernie or bust," she said. "I'm not going to have Trump held up to our head like a gun."

The demonstrators espoused a variety of causes, including economic justice, socialism and marijuana legalization. With Sanders out of the race, some of them were backing Green Party candidate Jill Stein.

Tensions rose when about 50 marchers sat down on Broad Street and refused to move unless the Mississippi state flag, which features the Confederate emblem, was taken down from a lamppost. The flags of all 50 states fly from light poles on the street.

Two officers stood in front of the lamppost, not allowing anyone to climb it, as hecklers jeered, "Think for yourself. Be a real man."

City officials later removed the flag.

"The Confederate flag raises strong feelings in our city and across the country," said the city's first deputy managing director, Brian Abernathy.

The four-day convention is far removed from City Hall and the skyscrapers of Center City.

In contrast, the Republican convention, which took place last week in Cleveland, was held in a bustling part of the city. A heavy police presence and fewer than expected protesters helped authorities maintain order. Only about two dozen arrests were made.

___

This story has been corrected to show the Green Party candidate is named Stein, not Streen.

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Trump's new derisive nickname for Clinton _ 'Rotten' http://www.dailyastorian.com/trumps-new-derisive-nickname-for-clinton--rotten-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world208b4c005c0d41609302f40b418f936d http://www.dailyastorian.com/trumps-new-derisive-nickname-for-clinton--rotten-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world208b4c005c0d41609302f40b418f936d#Comments Mon, 25 Jul 2016 20:20:58 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016307259637 ROANOKE, Va. (AP) — Donald Trump has a new, derisive nickname for his Democratic rival: Hillary "Rotten" Clinton.

Addressing backers Monday in an overly warm ballroom in Roanoke, Virginia, the Republican presidential nominee lashed out at Clinton as low-energy and needing naps. He argued that she dropped her maiden name, Rodham, because it sounds like "rotten."

"Why did she get rid of it? Hillary Rotten Clinton, Rotten Clinton. Hillary Rotten Clinton, right?" Trump told the crowd. "Maybe that's why, it's too close."

Trump has repeatedly referred to Clinton as "Crooked Hillary."

The event was held in the home state of Clinton's new running mate, Sen. Tim Kaine, whom Trump derided as a "weird little dude" and a political "hack." Trump argued that Clinton made a mistake when she chose Kaine, describing the well-liked former governor and senator as the opposite of the sort of fiery liberal that supporters of Clinton's former rival Bernie Sanders may have been drawn to.

Many of Sanders' supporters at the Democratic National Convention remain deeply committed to their candidate, holding demonstrations in Philadelphia and booing mentions of Clinton on the convention floor.

Trump reveled in the drama as he campaigned with his running mate, Mike Pence.

Speaking Monday night at a rally in North Carolina during a rally that capped off his first day on the road since becoming his party's nominee, Trump repeatedly pointed to the commotion in Philadelphia.

"What a mess they have going," said Trump. "Crazy Bernie's going crazy right now."

During the Virginia rally, the billionaire businessman unleashed a barrage of attacks against Clinton in light of the latest scandal to overshadow her run for office. He accused Clinton of disloyalty for not protecting outgoing Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz following the release of hacked emails that suggest some DNC staffers favored Clinton over Sanders.

Trump claims Wasserman Schultz "worked very hard to rig the system" in Clinton's favor, and Clinton responded by throwing her "under the bus."

He also suggested at one point that China may have been involved in the DNC hack, despite no evidence to suggest the country's involvement.

"Little did she know that China, Russia — one of our many, many friends — came in and hacked the hell out of us," Trump said sarcastically, framing the words "friends" in air quotes.

After Democratic Party officials learned their systems were attacked in late April, they sought the help of the cybersecurity firm CrowdStrike Inc., which then discovered traces of at least two sophisticated hacking groups on the Democrats' network — both of which have ties to the Russian government.

The FBI said Monday it is investigating how the hack occurred.

In North Carolina, Trump dismissed suggestions that the Russians may be trying to influence the election in his favor because of his relatively friendly approach to the country's president, Vladimir Putin. He called the idea "one of the weirdest conspiracies."

Still, he asked: "Wouldn't it be nice if we actually did get along with Russia?"

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Most evacuations canceled for Southern California wildfire http://www.dailyastorian.com/most-evacuations-canceled-for-southern-california-wildfire-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worldaa9500b783214aaa90dcfc4a0ac04b7b http://www.dailyastorian.com/most-evacuations-canceled-for-southern-california-wildfire-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worldaa9500b783214aaa90dcfc4a0ac04b7b#Comments Mon, 25 Jul 2016 20:53:19 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016307259868 SANTA CLARITA, Calif. (AP) — The majority of some 20,000 people forced from their homes by a wildfire that exploded during the weekend were told they could return home Monday night, though an army of firefighters continued battling flames in the rugged hills and canyons northwest of Los Angeles.

Residents of two neighborhoods still under threat had to remain out of their homes, the U.S. Forest Service said, after a day when the fire grew only slightly to about 55 square miles (142.26 sq. kilometers). So far 18 residences were confirmed destroyed in the blaze that started Friday afternoon and quickly tore through drought-ravaged brush that hadn't burned in decades.

Laurent Lacore, a native of France who lives in Santa Clarita, was among those who evacuated on Saturday, the last of his family of four to leave as the fire bore down on his house.

"The flames were right behind our backyard," he said.

He returned Monday night delighted to find the house and everything around it had been saved, and could see a line of red fire retardant where a helicopter had stopped the fire's approach.

"Everything is fine," he said. "Even all of the trees are there."

Some 300 miles to the northwest a blaze in the scenic Big Sur region of the Central Coast had destroyed 20 homes and threatened 1,650 others as it burned 25 square miles (64.75 sq. kilometers), though firefighters made gains Monday and had it 10 percent contained.

The two blazes sent smoke as far away as Nevada, where officials issued air pollution warnings.

In Santa Clarita, the call for widespread evacuations brought frustration among fire officials as some residents refused the orders.

That meant firefighters having to help the holdouts to safety instead of putting out destructive flames, County Fire Chief Daryl Osby said.

Some firefighters "felt that they lost additional structures because they had to stop what they were doing to help citizens evacuate," Osby said.

U.S. Forest Service spokesman Justin Correll urged residents to leave quickly when evacuation orders are issued because their "property becomes secondary."

"We don't want firemen to become traffic directors," he said.

In Santa Clarita, 30 miles (48 kilometers) northwest of downtown Los Angeles, the fire broke out Friday, spreading through rugged mountains before making its way into canyons with sprawling neighborhoods.

By Sunday night, about 10 percent of Santa Clarita's 200,000 residents had been ordered out of their homes, before most were allowed to return Monday night.

The fire exploded Saturday like a "crazy storm," said Kara Franklin, who said sand driven by heavy winds hit her in the face as she tried to get a horse and donkey into a trailer so she could tow the animals away. From a ridgetop, she saw flames engulf a neighborhood.

When the blaze appeared to die down, she thought the worst was over and returned. Then it flared up again, and she and her son used a garden hose to put out embers that ignited spot fires on her property before fleeing.

"The heat was so intense," Franklin said Monday from a high school that had been turned into an evacuation center. "It was an inferno that was blazing ... just coming over the ridge."

A house two doors from hers was engulfed, providing a buffer that helped save her house.

Three Forest Service firefighters lost their homes at a remote fire station in the San Gabriel Mountains, including two who were fighting the fire at the time.

The fire destroyed film sets at Sable Ranch in Santa Clarita, which has Old West-style buildings used for movie locations. It also forced a nonprofit sanctuary for rescued exotic creatures to evacuate 340 of its more than 400 animals, including Bengal tigers and a mountain lion.

Investigators on Monday were trying to determine the cause of death of a man whose body was found in a car in the fire zone Saturday.

Nearly 3,000 firefighters were trying to put the Santa Clarita blaze out.

Firefighters saved about 2,000 homes in the fire's first three days, Los Angeles County Deputy Fire Chief John Tripp said.

One belonged to Ted Kellum, a defense contractor who moved in two years ago with his wife and four children. Kellum recalled Monday that he saw smoke pouring over a mountain ridge Friday and "scurried" with his family when a wall of flames and a cloud of smoke followed.

On Sunday, their 20-year-old son lied about going to see a girlfriend and instead crawled under a bridge and crept back into the neighborhood to check on their house.

Kellum and his wife, Helen, teared up as they recalled the joy of finding out the house they loved was still standing.

"It's like an Eden," Kellum said. "It's so beautiful except for the risk."

___

A previous version of this story said incorrectly that a $3 million home was destroyed. The figure was an estimate from a neighbor of how much some homes in the area are worth.

___

Melley reported from Los Angeles. Associated Press writers Kristin Bender and Olga R. Rodriguez in San Francisco and John Antczak in Los Angeles contributed to this report.

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At least 19 killed, about 20 injured in knifing near Tokyo http://www.dailyastorian.com/at-least-19-killed-about-20-injured-in-knifing-near-tokyo-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worldd6b5f7b2e68843f8bf6b1623383a2923 http://www.dailyastorian.com/at-least-19-killed-about-20-injured-in-knifing-near-tokyo-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worldd6b5f7b2e68843f8bf6b1623383a2923#Comments Mon, 25 Jul 2016 19:31:57 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016307259659 SAGAMIHARA, Japan (AP) — At least 19 people were killed and about 20 wounded in a knife attack Tuesday at a facility for the handicapped in a city just outside Tokyo in the worst mass killing in generations in Japan.

Police said they responded to a call at about 2:30 a.m. from an employee saying something horrible was happening at the facility in the city of Sagamihara, 50 kilometers (30 miles) west of Tokyo.

A man turned himself in at a police station about two hours later, police in Sagamihara said. He left the knife in his car when he entered the station. He has been arrested on suspicion of attempted murder and trespassing.

Officials in Kanagawa prefecture, which borders Tokyo, identified the suspect as Satoshi Uematsu, and said he had worked at the facility until February. Japanese media reports said he was 26 years old.

He entered the building about 2:10 a.m. by breaking a glass window on the first floor of a residential building at the facility, Shinya Sakuma, head of prefectural health and welfare division, said at a news conference.

Kanagawa Gov. Yuji Kuroiwa expressed his condolences to the victims.

The Sagamihara City fire department says that 19 people were confirmed dead in the attack. The fire department said doctors at the scene confirmed the deaths.

The death toll could make this the worst mass killing in Japan in the post-World War II era.

A woman who lives across from the facility told Japanese broadcaster NHK that she saw police cars enter the facility around 3:30 a.m.

"I was told by a policeman to stay inside my house, as it could be dangerous," she said. "Then ambulances began arriving, and blood-covered people were taken away."

Japanese broadcaster NTV reported that Uematsu was upset because he had been fired, but that could not be independently confirmed.

The facility, called the Tsukui Yamayuri-en, is home to about 150 adult residents who have mental disabilities, Japan's Kyodo News service said.

Television footage showed a number of ambulances parked outside, with medical and other rescue workers running in and out.

Mass killings are relatively rare in Japan, which has extremely strict gun-control laws. In 2008, seven people were killed by a man who slammed a truck into a crowd of people in central Tokyo's Akihabara electronics district and then stabbed passers-by.

In 2001, a man killed eight children and injured 13 others in a knife attack at an elementary school in the city of Osaka. The incident shocked Japan and led to increased security at schools.

More recently, 14 were injured in 2010 by an unemployed man who stabbed and beat up passengers on two public buses outside a Japanese train station in Ibaraki Prefecture, about 25 miles (40 kilometers) northeast of Tokyo.

A man who lives near the site of the latest attack said he was shocked such an attack happened in the quiet, semi-rural area near Mount Takao, a mountain popular with hikers.

"I never imagined such a horrible thing happening," said Chikara Inabayashi, who was tending his watermelon patch. "I was astonished, that's the only thing I can say."

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Associated Press writer Satoshi Sugiyama in Tokyo contributed to this story.

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After disputes, Dem stars turn their convention positive http://www.dailyastorian.com/after-disputes-dem-stars-turn-their-convention--positive-da-ap-webfeeds-news-entertainment45a30889ac464f01ac02a47a3bb4b073 http://www.dailyastorian.com/after-disputes-dem-stars-turn-their-convention--positive-da-ap-webfeeds-news-entertainment45a30889ac464f01ac02a47a3bb4b073#Comments Mon, 25 Jul 2016 19:03:25 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016307259709 PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Hillary Clinton's campaign joined forces with former primary rival Bernie Sanders and some of his supporters Monday in a scramble to tamp down a fresh burst of party disunity and give an upbeat tone to the opening night of the Democratic convention.

Sanders, one of the night's featured speakers, sent urgent messages to his backers urging them to avoid protests on the convention floor. The Clinton campaign opened up speaking spots for his supporters who touted his accomplishments, and warned that not backing Clinton would only help Republican Donald Trump.

An array of office holders and celebrities hammered home the call for unity, with singer Paul Simon singing his "Bridge Over Troubled Water" as delegates linked arms and swayed to the music.

Former President Bill "Clinton smiled and clapped from the audience.

First lady Michelle Obama was making her first appearance of the presidential campaign. Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a favorite of liberals and one of the party's toughest critics of Trump, was also taking the stage.

"Trump thinks he can win votes by fanning the flames of fear and hatred," Warren said in excerpts released ahead of her speech. "By turning neighbor against neighbor. By persuading you that the real problem in America is your fellow Americans — people who don't look like you, or don't talk like you, or don't worship like you."

Clinton's campaign hoped the nighttime line-up would overshadow a tumultuous start to the four-day convention. The release of hacked party emails revealed the Democratic National Committee had favored Clinton over Sanders in the primary, despite vows of neutrality. The uproar led to the forced resignation of party chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz.

While her ouster was a major victory for Sanders, it wasn't enough to ease the frustration of his supporters. Inside the arena, chants of "Bernie" echoed through the arena as the convention opened, and boos could be heard at times when Clinton's name was raised. Outside the convention hall, several hundred Sanders backers marched down Philadelphia's sweltering streets with signs carrying messages such as "Never Hillary."

Campaigning in North Carolina, Trump seemed to revel in the Democrats' commotion, telling supporters that Clinton made a mistake by not choosing a more liberal running mate to appease Sanders' base. "Crazy Bernie's going crazy right now," he said.

But in Philadelphia, Delegates waved "Love Trumps Hate" signs and leapt to their feet as immigration supporters, gay rights advocates, and labor leaders took the stage.

Comedian-turned-Sen. Al Franken, a Clinton supporter, and actress Sarah Silverman, a Sanders supporter, made a joint appearance to promote party unity.

"I am proud to be part of Bernie's movement," Silverman said as the crowd roared. "And a vital part of that movement is making absolutely sure Hillary Clinton is our next president of the United States."

Trump was a frequent target throughout the night, though the jabs were often more mocking than mean. The tone was a sharp contrast to the Republican convention, where the attacks against Clinton was bitingly personal, including chants of "Lock her up."

Wasserman Schultz had planned to be among those taking the stage, despite the email hacking controversy. But she stepped aside, bowing to pressure from Democrats who feared the mere sight of her on stage would prompt strong opposition from Sanders' backers.

The outgoing chairwoman did watch the gathering from a private suite at the arena.

Clinton's team hoped Wasserman Schultz's resignation — along with an apology from the DNC to Sanders and his supporters — would keep the convention floor calm.

Discussions between the two camps prompted Sanders to send emails and text messages to supporters asking them not to protest.

"Our credibility as a movement will be damaged by booing, turning of backs, walking out or other similar displays," Sanders wrote.

The party infighting had echoes of last week's Republican convention, where some major GOP leaders voiced their displeasure with Trump and others didn't even show up. Clinton promised a stark contrast to the GOP gathering, saying she planned to highlight "success stories" and flesh out details of her proposed policies.

Sanders was a relatively unknown Vermont senator when he decided to challenge for the Democratic nomination. He stunned the Clinton campaign with his broad support among young people and liberals, as well as his online fundraising prowess. But he struggled to appeal to black voters and couldn't match the former secretary of state's ties to the Democratic establishment.

Sanders previewed his remarks during an appearance earlier Monday before supportive delegates. He implored them to vote for Clinton, generating a chorus of boos.

"Brothers and sisters, this is the real world that we live in," Sanders said as he tried to quiet the crowd. "Trump is a bully and a demagogue."

The controversy over some 19,000 leaked DNC emails, however, threatened to complicate those plans. The correspondence, posted by WikiLeaks over the weekend, showed top officials at the supposedly neutral DNC favoring Clinton over Sanders in the presidential primaries.

Clinton campaign officials blamed the hack, which is now being investigated by the FBI, on Russian military intelligence agencies. The campaign also accused Moscow of trying to meddle in the U.S. election and help Trump, who has said he might not necessarily defend NATO allies if they are attacked by Russia.

A cybersecurity firm the Democrats employed found traces of at least two sophisticated hacking groups on their network — both of which have ties to the Russian government. Those hackers took at least a year's worth of detailed chats, emails and research on Trump, according to a person knowledgeable of the breach who wasn't authorized to speak publicly about the matter.

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Associated Press writers Kathleen Hennessey, Catherine Lucey, Kathleen Ronayne and Julie Bykowicz in Philadelphia, Lisa Lerer in Charlotte, North Carolina, contributed to this report.

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On Twitter follow Julie Pace at http://twitter.com/jpaceDC and Ken Thomas at http://twitter.com/kthomasdc

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Flight 370: With search suspended, a cold-case file awaits http://www.dailyastorian.com/flight-370-with-search-suspended-a-cold-case-file-awaits-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worldc2bab851b351423cbd656368b5fdd8f4 http://www.dailyastorian.com/flight-370-with-search-suspended-a-cold-case-file-awaits-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worldc2bab851b351423cbd656368b5fdd8f4#Comments Mon, 25 Jul 2016 18:22:34 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016307259685 BANGKOK (AP) — For two years and more, it has been a lost ship, a metal container carrying 239 souls that simply disappeared one late Asian night never to be seen again. And now, the search for the remains of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 likely will become a thing of memory, too.

With Friday's announcement that the meticulous ocean search for the missing jetliner will be suspended — in effect, called off — one of this decade's most tantalizing unanswered questions is headed toward becoming, in effect, a cold case.

"I am not surprised it's coming to an end without any answers," Tony Wong, a businessman in Kuala Lumpur, said Monday.

"People are slowly forgetting the incident," he said. "No one will ever know the truth."

The truth may be out there. The problem is, you have to know where to look. And that's been precisely the problem all along.

The Boeing 777-200ER vanished on a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing on March 8, 2014. Investigators believed it turned back west and then south before dropping into the Indian Ocean west of Australia, where the search has been concentrated. The Malaysian government has concluded that it was deliberately steered off course. Conspiracy theories, unsurprisingly, still abound in the vacuum of facts: Was it blown up? Steered into the sea? Diverted to a remote airstrip somewhere? Abducted by aliens?

For a long stretch, it seemed the world's biggest loose end — a global obsession for weeks, a niggling unsolved riddle for years. And behind the epic tale were the lost souls and the families they left behind, which expected maximum effort and, to hear many relatives tell it over the long months, a successful resolution.

They were not happy at the news that the search was being suspended. To varying degrees, they have accused investigators and searchers and the governments overseeing them of disingenuousness, incompetence and nefarious political agendas.

In China, relatives have roundly denounced the decision. They still don't seem ready to think about the finality of it all.

"They are actually just playing with words," Hu Xiulan, the mother of a Flight 370 passenger, said Monday. "'Suspension' means termination to us. We strongly demand a re-investigation into how the plane went missing, and there is no excuse for the suspension of the search."

The decision to suspend the search, which has endured through damaged equipment and punishing weather, was made jointly by the three countries conducting the operation: Malaysia, Australia and China, which lost the most people in the aircraft's disappearance. Together, they already have spent $135 million searching a 46,300-square-mile area.

The governments were delicate in their language Friday — they did not say outright that they were ending the search. But there is a general sense that it is unlikely to continue unless specific new evidence is found to suggest a particular location. And the search in its current incarnation will not end immediately; it could last into the winter months, officials have said.

Finding the plane would not just bring emotional closure to families. It also would hand investigators and the airline industry crucial information and tools to understand why Flight 370 might have gone down and how similar occurrences might be prevented.

A critical mass of actual wreckage beyond the few confirmed pieces that have turned up would also convey a sense of competence that we humans can go out and find our lost stuff in the depths of our oceans. Which in many ways, despite complex oceanographic models, we still can't.

"We can send spacecraft to Jupiter and Saturn and Mars to see their surface, but we can't send a craft to the bottom of the ocean to look at our own surface," Western Australia University oceanographer Charitha Pattiaratchi said.

The pressure on authorities, he said, suggests that a breather from the search might actually be the best approach.

"It's probably good to pause and then take stock of things," Pattiaratchi said. "They can try again if there's some better data or better technology."

In the meantime, the world goes on. The increased pace of the news cycle, the unremitting parade of minor violence and major cataclysm, pushes us away from this singular puzzle and into the more recent sad and lethal spectacles of Orlando and Nice, Dallas and Munich, Baghdad and Kabul.

It is so much, sometimes, that we might fail to remember one fundamental point in the story that was, and is, Flight 370: The world we call home swallowed a giant airplane and the people aboard it and, 871 days later, we have absolutely no idea what became of them.

There is an expectation, fueled by a modern world filled with technology and accomplishment, that if we want something enough, if we throw enough money and resources at it, there's nothing we can't do. And when that narrative of expectation is interrupted by something as strange and terrible as the unresolved disappearance of a giant metal machine, it doesn't go down easy.

"It's all a big fabrication, a big cover-up," said Sakinab Shah, the eldest sister of senior pilot Capt. Zaharie Ahmad Shah. "Things just don't add up."

Then she said something that echoed many people's comments in the first days after the disappearance, when the modern world's best machines and algorithms were brought to bear to find that plane and there were high hopes it would be found.

"With modern-day technology," Shah said, "how can there be a mystery?"

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EDITOR'S NOTE: Ted Anthony is the director of Asia-Pacific news for The Associated Press. Follow him on Twitter at http://twitter.com/anthonyted. Associated Press journalists Eileen Ng in Kuala Lumpur, Yu Bing in Beijing and Nick Perry in Wellington, New Zealand, contributed to this report.

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Comeback route: NFL reinstates wide receiver Josh Gordon http://www.dailyastorian.com/comeback-route-nfl-reinstates-wide-receiver-josh-gordon-da-ap-webfeeds-news-pro-sports93b0de11010d4434a796318f76e8ad04 http://www.dailyastorian.com/comeback-route-nfl-reinstates-wide-receiver-josh-gordon-da-ap-webfeeds-news-pro-sports93b0de11010d4434a796318f76e8ad04#Comments Mon, 25 Jul 2016 18:11:22 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016307259721 CLEVELAND (AP) — Josh Gordon's curious and complicated career has taken a new turn.

He's getting yet another chance.

The talented but troubled wide receiver has been reinstated on a conditional basis by NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, who met face to face with Gordon last week and said he believes the 25-year-old can "make the right choices" going forward.

Gordon has been banned since February 2015 for multiple violations of the league's drug policies. He will be suspended for the first four games of the 2016-17 season, but he's allowed to join the team in its upcoming training camp and can participate in meetings and conditioning work.

The league said once Gordon meets clinical requirements, he can take part in preseason activities, including practices and games. The Browns have their first practice of training camp Friday.

It's a fresh start for Gordon, who emerged as one of the league's rising stars in 2013 before several missteps led to his banishment.

Gordon expressed his gratitude in a message on Twitter.

"I'm blessed and grateful to be granted this opportunity," he wrote. "I can't wait to get back out there and play the game I love in front of the great fans of Cleveland.

"I want to thank the NFLPA, Commissioner Goodell, the Haslam family and Browns organization, my agent Drew Rosenhaus, as well as my mentors for their continuous support along the way.

"I've heard only good things from my teammates about the positive direction the organization is heading and I want to do everything I can to be there to help further that process not only for the team but to better myself as well."

As long as he stays clean, Gordon, who met with Goodell in New York on July 19, is eligible to return to the team on Oct. 3 and play in the Oct. 9 home game against New England. That's also the game in which Patriots quarterback Tom Brady will return following his suspension for Deflategate.

During his four-game suspension, Gordon may participate in team meetings and other activities, but can't practice or play in games.

The Browns said in a statement that would Gordon would be with the team for the start of training camp. "At that time, we will discuss directly with Josh the direction of our team, our expectations of our players and a plan to support him on and off the field," the statement said.

Gordon was suspended 10 games in 2014 and the entire 2015 season for substance violations, a pattern that began during his college career at Baylor and Utah. He was denied reinstatement in April after failing a drug test because of samples that also tested positive for marijuana.

In a letter to Gordon, Goodell made it clear the onus is on the former Pro Bowler to stay clean.

"As we discussed at our (July 19) meeting, as Commissioner, I want nothing more than to see you turn your circumstances around and succeed," Goodell said.

"Countless others including your agent, teammates and coaches, (owner) Jimmy Haslam and the leadership of the organization, the Program professionals and Jim Brown also have pledged to provide you with every resource at their disposal. But as you acknowledged, ultimately, your future is your responsibility. I have every belief that you can make the right choices, but it will be up to you to do so."

First-year coach Hue Jackson has mostly steered clear of discussing Gordon or the player's future during his first months with Cleveland.

Brown, the Hall of Fame running back and current team special advisor, had a prominent role in helping Gordon get back in good standing with the league.

Gordon had a breakout season in 2013, when he led the league with 1,646 yards receiving, scored nine touchdowns and averaged 117.6 yards per game. However, he has missed 27 of 32 games since and his off-the-field shortcomings have threatened to end a promising future.

With his situation unclear, the Browns selected Baylor wide receiver Corey Coleman in the first round of this year's draft. Gordon will also be reunited with former college teammate Robert Griffin III, who is expected to be Cleveland's starting quarterback this season.

During his ban, Gordon has continued to receive support from Browns cornerback Joe Haden, who tweeted, "Welcome back!!" to his friend.

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Online:

AP NFL website: www.pro32.ap.org and AP NFL Twitter feed: http://twitter.com/AP_NFL

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Congressional committee seeks gunman's VA record http://www.dailyastorian.com/congressional-committee-seeks-gunmans-va-record-da-ap-webfeeds-news-entertainmenta3f0e66292d34ec79182b87d5c2ee858 http://www.dailyastorian.com/congressional-committee-seeks-gunmans-va-record-da-ap-webfeeds-news-entertainmenta3f0e66292d34ec79182b87d5c2ee858#Comments Mon, 25 Jul 2016 17:21:20 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016307259635 ST. MARYS, Kan. (AP) — The chairman of the U.S. House Committee on Veterans Affairs has requested all VA medical records for the former Marine who killed three law enforcement officers in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Florida Rep. Jeff Miller sent a letter dated July 21 to the Department of Veterans Affairs requesting records for Gavin Long, an Iraq war veteran. The Republican also asked for a briefing about the VA services Long received, saying the committee would "not accept any restriction placed on the information."

VA spokeswoman Walinda West confirmed Monday that the department received Miller's letter, saying only that the VA would "respond directly to the chairman's office."

Long's mother, Corine Woodley, told PBS' Tavis Smiley that her son had post-traumatic stress disorder and unsuccessfully sought the VA's help. Woodley said her son received a letter from the VA denying his request for PTSD treatment in 2013, on grounds that it wasn't related to his military service. She has declined to talk to The Associated Press.

Kansas Rep. Tim Huelskamp, a member of the House committee, said Miller was pushing for the information but that VA officials often wait months to answer or "give you a non-answer."

"It seems there might be something there, but we don't yet know, and the VA is so far stonewalling," Huelskamp said after a town hall meeting Monday in St. Marys, Kansas.

Authorities say Long killed Baton Rouge police officers Montrell Jackson and Matthew Gerald, and East Baton Rouge Parish sheriff's deputy Brad Garafola during a shootout July 17. The attack followed protests sparked by the death of Alton Sterling, who was black, by white police officers. Investigators said they don't know if Long was responding to Sterling's death, but that Long deliberately targeted officers.

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Associated Press writer Michael Kunzelman contributed to this report from Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

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Follow John Hanna on Twitter at https://twitter.com/apjdhanna

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Activists protest no charges for Arizona officer in shooting http://www.dailyastorian.com/activists-protest-no-charges-for-arizona-officer-in-shooting-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world3027ee32efbc4f49b393868faf8d9e69 http://www.dailyastorian.com/activists-protest-no-charges-for-arizona-officer-in-shooting-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world3027ee32efbc4f49b393868faf8d9e69#Comments Mon, 25 Jul 2016 17:10:29 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016307259623 PHOENIX (AP) — A small group in Arizona on Monday protested a decision not to charge a police officer in the shooting death of a woman accused of shoplifting and threatening the lawman with scissors.

The shooting of 27-year-old Navajo woman Loreal Tsingine in March led tribal officials to urge the U.S. Justice Department to investigate the treatment of American Indians who live in towns that border the reservation.

Maricopa County prosecutor Bill Montgomery announced Friday that his office found no evidence of criminal conduct on the part of Winslow, Arizona, Officer Austin Shipley in Tsingine's death.

About 20 people chanted "Justice for Loreal" and "Shame on Bill Montgomery" outside the prosecutor's office in Phoenix as employees arrived for work Monday morning.

The Phoenix protest came amid a wave of demonstrations and racial tension over police shooting of black men as well as the fatal attacks on law enforcement officers.

Members of the Navajo Nation Council said in a statement they were appalled by Montgomery's decision and demanded a federal investigation.

A phone number listed for Austin Shipley was disconnected, and it's not clear whether he has an attorney.

Records show that at least two officers who trained Shipley had serious concerns about his work and that one recommended the police department not keep him on the force. The concerns included that he was too quick to go for his service weapon, ignored directives from superiors and falsified reports, according to records obtained by The Associated Press.

Tsingine's family has filed a $10.5 million notice of claim against the city, saying Shipley violated her civil rights and Winslow was negligent in "hiring, training, retaining, controlling and supervising" the police officer.

The wrongful-death claim, filed July 1, is a precursor to a lawsuit and seeks $2 million for Tsingine's husband and $8.5 million for her 8-year-old daughter.

"Our position remains that even though (Shipley) may not be held criminally liable, it was careless for the city of Winslow to give him a gun and a badge," said the Tsingine family's Phoenix-based attorney, Robert Pastor.

Lawyers for the city have declined comment on the claim, saying it's the city's policy not to talk about pending litigation.

Shipley is on paid administrative leave pending the outcome of an internal affairs investigation that will be conducted by the Mesa Police Department, Winslow officials said Friday.

Shipley fired five shots at Tsingine after responding to a shoplifting call at a Winslow convenience store.

According to a police report, Shipley attempted to detain Tsingine, but she resisted arrest and was taken to the ground.

The officer said Tsingine swung the scissors at him, and he retreated with his gun drawn and gave multiple commands for her to stop and drop the scissors.

The police report said Tsingine didn't comply and got up and aggressively ran at Shipley with scissors in hand before he fired. She was pronounced dead at the scene.

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Associated Press photographer Matt York contributed to this report.

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The Latest: City urges protesters to seek shelter from storm http://www.dailyastorian.com/the-latest-city-urges-protesters-to-seek-shelter-from-storm-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world1728b8d45c3244efb0e135ded6c0a4af http://www.dailyastorian.com/the-latest-city-urges-protesters-to-seek-shelter-from-storm-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world1728b8d45c3244efb0e135ded6c0a4af#Comments Mon, 25 Jul 2016 17:02:57 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016307259829 PHILADELPHIA (AP) — The Latest on protests on the first day of the Democratic National Convention (all times local):

7:20 p.m.

Philadelphia officials are urging those protesting in a park across from the site of the Democratic convention to seek shelter from a storm rolling through the area with thunderstorms and heavy rain.

The Philadelphia Office of Emergency Management urged those in FDR Park to seek shelter beneath an Interstate 95 underpass.

Organizers also recommended that media members evacuate a tent in the parking lot of the Wells Fargo Center arena Monday night, saying that it was not designed "to fully protect inhabitants in the event of a direct lightning strike."

The National Weather Service has issued a severe thunderstorm and flash flood warning in the city.

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7:10 p.m.

Philadelphia police say 55 people have been cited for disorderly conduct after demonstrators tried to climb barricades near the Democratic convention.

Police say no one was arrested in the crowd of largely pro-Bernie Sanders protesters.

Hundreds in the group had marched several miles to the convention site in South Philadelphia despite punishing afternoon temperatures that reached the high 90s.

Transit officials are now keeping anyone without a convention ticket from taking the Broad Street subway to the final stop at the arena. They say police requested the move to control crowds outside the site.

Sanders is to speak at the convention Monday night.

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6:50 p.m.

Transit officials are blocking anyone without a credential for the Democratic convention from traveling to the subway stop by the arena after dozens of demonstrators were detained outside.

A spokesman for the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority says police requested the move because of the crowds on the street near the Wells Fargo Center in South Philadelphia.

Septa spokesman Andrew Busch says that southbound passengers must have a credential to travel to the final stop on the Broad Street line near the convention site. He says there are no restrictions on the northbound route.

Hundreds of protesters supporting Bernie Sanders have marched about 4 miles to the area. It's not clear if any of those detained as they tried to climb over barriers will be charged or cited.

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5:50 p.m.

Authorities have begun detaining protesters who tried to climb over barricades manned by police at the edge of the security zone that surrounds the site of the Democratic convention.

Chief Inspector Joseph Sullivan says over 40 people have been detained Monday.

Other protesters sat down outside the entrance to the subway station where service to the arena had been suspended earlier Monday.

Officials say some people will be detained temporarily and receive citations, but won't be arrested.

A number of the protesters were affiliated with Democracy Spring, a group that wants to abolish superdelegates.

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5:40 p.m.

City officials in Philadelphia have removed Mississippi's state flag from a lamppost after demonstrators sat in a roadway in protest while marching down Broad Street ahead of the Democratic convention.

The flag includes the Confederate emblem.

Brian Abernathy, Philadelphia's first deputy managing director, says that the flag and a second one nearby have been taken down.

He says the city started to receive complaints from residents since the flags went back up as part of reinvigoration efforts of the so-called Avenue of the States ahead of the convention.

The flags of the 50 states have been adorning the light poles flanking Broad Street.

Philadelphia police were heckled when they kept protesters from climbing the pole to remove the flags.

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5:30 p.m.

A teenage soprano who drew rave reviews for his performance last year for Pope Francis has performed the national anthem at the Democratic National Convention.

Bobby Hill, of Philadelphia's Keystone State Boychoir, sang the anthem on Monday.

For Pope Francis' visit to Philadelphia last year, the 14-year-old sang Andrew Lloyd Webber's "Pie Jesu."

He also presented the pope with a rock that the choir brought back from its trip to Antarctica.

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4:50 p.m.

Philadelphia's transit agency has shut down service to the subway station that serves the arena where the Democratic convention is being held due to "security measures" as protesters marched outside.

The Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority said southbound service will end on the Broad Street line at Oregon Avenue, one stop before the final station, until further notice. The agency said there was northbound service from the convention site station.

Police were extending metal fences to the edge of the sidewalk outside of the station to keep protesters from advancing.

Protesters chanted "Nonviolent! Peaceful protest!" while trying to make their way over the fences.

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4:45 p.m.

Philadelphia police say they haven't issued a single citation to protesters marching through town on the first day of the Democratic convention.

Police Commissioner Richard Ross says no major problems have been reported from any of the demonstrations taking place across town.

The stifling heat with temperatures in the high-90s has led a few marchers to seek medical aid. And officials are keeping an eye on the threat of severe storms in the forecast Monday night.

Many of the protesters are gathering in an outdoor park near the convention site.

Hundreds of people marched several miles from City Hall to the park Monday afternoon to support former presidential candidate Bernie Sanders, the Green Party and other causes.

Sanders has met with his delegates in Philadelphia and asked them to support front-runner Hillary Clinton.

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4:30 p.m.

Philadelphia will remove Mississippi's state flag from lamppost after a group of about 50 protesters sat in a roadway in protest while marching down Philadelphia's Broad Street ahead of the Democratic convention.

The flag includes the Confederate emblem.

Brian Abernathy, Philadelphia's first deputy managing director, says that the flag and a second one nearby will be removed Monday night.

He says the city started to receive complaints from residents since the flags went back up as part of reinvigoration efforts of the so-called Avenue of the States ahead of the convention.

The flags of all 50 states fly from light poles flanking Broad Street.

Philadelphia police told the marchers they can't climb the pole and take the flag down. The crowd heckled the officers, telling them to think for themselves.

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This story has been corrected to fix a typo in Abernathy's title.

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4 p.m.

Activists Cornel West and Chris Hedges are helping lead a march against poverty and homelessness on the opening day of the Democratic convention in Philadelphia.

Monday's March for Our Lives also features Jill Stein, the Green Party's presidential candidate. She spoke to the crowd of hundreds, who chanted "Jill not Hill!" It was organized by The Poor People's Economic Human Rights Campaign.

The city initially denied the anti-poverty group's application for a permit to march. The American Civil Liberties Union filed the suit in June on the group's behalf, and the city settled by giving them a permit.

The group is marching to a park near the arena that is the site for the convention. Stein is set to have a rally for her campaign there.

Other events in FDR Park include a candlelight vigil organized by Bernie Sanders supporters who are mourning "The Death of Democracy."

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3:30 p.m.

A group of about 50 protesters have stopped their march down Philadelphia's Broad Street ahead of the Democratic convention and are sitting on the roadway refusing to move until Mississippi's state flag is taken down from a lamppost.

The flag includes the Confederate emblem. The marchers, mostly supporters of Bernie Sanders, say the DNC protects this type of mentality.

Philadelphia police are telling the marchers they can't climb the pole and take the flag down. The crowd is heckling the officers, telling them to think for themselves.

The flags of all 50 states fly from light poles flanking Broad Street.

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2:30 p.m.

Hundreds of protesters are marching south of Philadelphia's City Hall in support of former Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders and other causes despite high temperatures that have led a few people to seek medical help.

The Philadelphia Fire Department says that nine people in town for the Democratic convention have been treated by emergency responders. Three of them have been taken to hospitals for evaluation.

The National Weather Service says temperatures will hover in the mid- to upper-90s on Monday. With humidity, it will feel more like 105 degrees.

Some of the protesters marching down Broad Street are criticizing the Democratic Party a day after emails suggested a party bias against Sanders.

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1:55 p.m.

A Cleveland police union, with the help of local businesses, is sending two refrigerated trucks full of water, sports drinks and the city's famed corned beef sandwiches to Philadelphia for law enforcement officers providing security at that city's Democratic convention.

Cleveland Police Patrolmen's Association President Steve Loomis said Monday that the trucks would be headed to Philadelphia as soon as they're loaded.

Loomis says individuals dropped off thousands of cases of water and sports drink at the union hall last week for officers working security at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland. People also donated large amounts of non-perishable food like granola bars, as well as items such as suntan lotion and bug spray.

Loomis says volunteers distributed a truckload of bottled water each day during the four-day convention.

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1:30 p.m.

Actress and Bernie Sanders supporter Rosario Dawson says followers need to listen to the Vermont senator "and see how we can take this revolution to the next level."

Dawson spoke to a group of Sanders' delegates at an event before the Democratic convention on Monday.

Dawson, an outspoken Sanders supporter who starred in "Rent," says that it's important to make sure that liberal initiatives included in the Democrats' party platform are followed.

She says if it isn't, "then civil disobedience will follow."

Dawson opened for Sanders, who told supporters that they need to support presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton to defeat Donald Trump.

Dawson says that Clinton is a follower and not a leader and that "our revolution is depending on your time, your energy, your blood sweat and tears."

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1:15 p.m.

Bernie Sanders supporters who marched across a bridge from New Jersey into Philadelphia in the sweltering heat have arrived in the City of Brotherly Love ahead of the Democratic convention.

About 100 marchers chanting "We are the 99 percent" have made their way across the Ben Franklin Bridge and spilled onto the Philadelphia side.

They plan to meet up with a rally at Philadelphia's City Hall. The group will then march down Broad Street toward a park across the street from where the convention begins late Monday.

The heat wave hasn't keep protesters away from Monday's rallies, but Police Commissioner Richard Ross is urging marchers to be careful and not overestimate their abilities. Temperatures are in the high 90s but feel more like 105 degrees.

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12:30 p.m.

Danny Glover has told the Democratic National Convention's black caucus that it's important to push for "transformative change" and "listen to new voices that demand speaking truth to power."

The actor described Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump as a fascist and said citizens have to turn out to vote to defeat him.

Former NAACP President Ben Jealous, New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker, the Rev. Jesse Jackson and DNC Vice Chairwoman Donna Brazile were among the group that spoke to the group Monday.

Brazile says Bernie Sanders will "point the way forward" in his convention speech Monday night.

She apologized to those offended or betrayed by "ridiculous and insensitive" hacked emails from the Democratic Party that appeared to show the DNC favored Clinton over Sanders during the primaries.

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12:05 p.m.

Philadelphia's police commissioner says he was pleased with how police and protesters handled the first day of protests at the Democratic National Convention, but he compared Sunday to a "scrimmage game."

Commissioner Richard Ross said Monday that the protests around the city will only get bigger.

Ross stood outside City Hall as a group of Bernie Sanders supporters gathered, chanting "Nominate Sanders or lose in November!"

The commissioner says heat ranks high on his list of concerns as the city experiences an oppressive heat index above 100 degrees.

Ross says his officers on bikes were "hardcore" Sunday and he couldn't get them to take breaks in air conditioning. He says he hopes the officers will take breaks Monday to get water and spend some time in the shade.

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11:20 a.m.

Democratic National Convention protesters are gathering on the New Jersey side of a bridge leading to Philadelphia, preparing to march across it and possibly shut down traffic.

Busloads of activists are expected to march Monday across the Ben Franklin Bridge, most of them supporters of former Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders.

Organizer Gary Frazier says if the crowd is big enough, they'll try to shut down traffic on the bridge.

Frazier says the goal is to get the convention to nominate Sanders for president. He says if that doesn't happen, there will be a push to withdraw Sanders supporters from the Democratic Party.

Sanders has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president.

Sanders supporters are angry over hacked emails that reveal the DNC might have favored Clinton over Sanders during the party's presidential primaries.

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10 a.m.

Protesters are gearing up outside Philadelphia's City Hall for a long, hot day of marches and rallies on the opening day of the Democratic National Convention.

Members of Equality Coalition, which supports the beliefs of former Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders and Green Party candidate Jill Stein, are arranging to have hundreds of spray bottles filled with water to hand out to protesters. They're also preparing buckets full of ice and towels to help overheated marchers cool off.

The National Weather Service says temperatures will hover in the mid- to upper-90s on Monday. With humidity, it will feel more like 105 degrees.

Organizer Jenni Kelleher says she marched Sunday when temperatures were in the high 90s. She doesn't think the heat will keep protesters away.

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8:15 a.m.

After some early morning thunderstorms, the heat wave that's been steaming Philadelphia ahead of the Democratic National Convention is set to reach its peak.

The National Weather Service says temperatures will hover in the mid- to upper-90s on Monday, the first day of the convention. With humidity, it will feel more like 105 degrees.

Protester Tony Schuster is staying at a campground in New Jersey. The Bernie Sanders supporter from Michigan says despite all the thunder, it didn't rain too heavily there. He says campground conditions are good and it's not too muddy. Mostly, he says, it's just hot.

The city is under an excessive heat warning until 6 p.m.

Sanders is due to deliver Monday's closing address at the convention, where Hillary Clinton will receive the formal nomination for president.

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12:30 a.m.

The Democratic National Convention gets underway in Philadelphia on Monday.

The city is preparing for much bigger demonstrations than the Republican convention last week in Cleveland, and much higher temperatures.

In one of the largest rallies planned for the day, a pro-Bernie Sanders group is expected to walk across the Ben Franklin Bridge, which connects Camden, New Jersey, and Philadelphia.

The demonstrations, largely driven by Sanders supporters, have been peaceful, so far.

On Sunday, several protests were held around the city.

Volunteers will be handing out water all week to demonstrators as the region copes with an oppressive heat wave. The National Weather Service says it will hit a peak on Monday with temperatures in the city possibly reaching 100 degrees, but feeling like 108.

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OR Lottery http://www.dailyastorian.com/or-lottery-da-ap-webfeeds-news-northwest768433e7285a46629229c4c6b5e3a4cd http://www.dailyastorian.com/or-lottery-da-ap-webfeeds-news-northwest768433e7285a46629229c4c6b5e3a4cd#Comments Mon, 25 Jul 2016 22:10:54 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016307259681 PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) _ These Oregon lotteries were drawn Monday:


Lucky Lines

01-08-10-16-FREE-18-22-27-29

(one, eight, ten, sixteen, FREE, eighteen, twenty-two, twenty-seven, twenty-nine)

Estimated jackpot: $34,000


Mega Millions

Estimated jackpot: $15 million


Megabucks

03-22-23-28-34-35

(three, twenty-two, twenty-three, twenty-eight, thirty-four, thirty-five)

Estimated jackpot: $7.8 million


Pick 4 10PM

0-4-5-0

(zero, four, five, zero)


Pick 4 1PM

1-3-7-4

(one, three, seven, four)


Pick 4 4PM

2-8-4-8

(two, eight, four, eight)


Pick 4 7PM

3-2-8-1

(three, two, eight, one)


Powerball

Estimated jackpot: $422 million


Win for Life

06-37-41-67

(six, thirty-seven, forty-one, sixty-seven)

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AP Top Political News at 11:55 p.m. EDT http://www.dailyastorian.com/ap-top-political-news-at-1155-pm-edt-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worldabdbdebb35002efcf18b7a4d6414823e http://www.dailyastorian.com/ap-top-political-news-at-1155-pm-edt-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-worldabdbdebb35002efcf18b7a4d6414823e#Comments Mon, 25 Jul 2016 21:00:17 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016307259930 The Latest: Russian diplomat scoffs at DNC hack allegationsDie-hard Sanders' backers divided on backing ClintonVIEWER'S GUIDE: Tuesday's roll call says it allMore than 50 pro-Sanders demonstrators cited by policeWarren makes case for Clinton, derides Trump as selfishTrump's new derisive nickname for Clinton _ 'Rotten'At Dem convention, Obama seeks to counter GOP doom-and-gloomDemocratic emails: All about the hack, the leak, the discord]]> AP Top News at 11:51 p.m. EDT http://www.dailyastorian.com/ap-top-news-at-1151-pm-edt-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world0205c081f8febc73526c8b1bf162dce6 http://www.dailyastorian.com/ap-top-news-at-1151-pm-edt-da-ap-webfeeds-news-nation-world0205c081f8febc73526c8b1bf162dce6#Comments Mon, 25 Jul 2016 20:53:31 -0400 http://www.dailyastorian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2016307259922 More than 50 pro-Sanders demonstrators cited by policeDemocratic emails: All about the hack, the leak, the discord10 Things to Know for TuesdayAt least 19 killed, about 20 injured in knifing near TokyoIS attacker: Germans "won't be able to sleep peacefully"Flight 370: With search suspended, a cold-case file awaitsAPNewsBreak: Pfizer: Arkansas execution would 'misuse' drugHistoric solar flight marks first round-the-world journey]]>