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Water Under the Bridge: Oct. 11, 2017

From the pages of Astoria’s daily newspapers

Published on October 11, 2017 12:01AM

Gavin and Lady Irene Astor received Sunday an autographed copy of the book “Adventure at Astoria 1810-1814” during Astor Library dedicatory ceremonies. The author, Hoyt Franchere of Portland State college, could not attend the ceremonies due to ill health. The book is a new edition of the journal of Franchere’s ancestor Gabriel Franchere, a clerk with the Astor expedition.

The Daily Astorian/File

Gavin and Lady Irene Astor received Sunday an autographed copy of the book “Adventure at Astoria 1810-1814” during Astor Library dedicatory ceremonies. The author, Hoyt Franchere of Portland State college, could not attend the ceremonies due to ill health. The book is a new edition of the journal of Franchere’s ancestor Gabriel Franchere, a clerk with the Astor expedition.

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10 years ago this week — 2007

After months of wondering if the next season of “Shanghaied in Astoria” would perhaps be street theater, or a wandering minstrel show, the Astor Street Opry Company’s board of directors announced at a wrap party Saturday that it had found a new home for the annual musical melodrama.

Starting next summer, audiences can sigh with the heroine and boo at the villain in the building that formerly housed Roy’s Maytag, 129 W. Bond St.

Astoria’s Valley Bronze Art Gallery has closed its storefront at the corner of 12th and Commercial streets, where unique sculpture collections have been on display for the past three years.

On Friday, sales manager Malcolm Phinney packed up the artwork from the showroom and loaded it into moving vans to be taken to the Valley Bronze Gallery in Joseph, where the Valley Bronze Foundry makes metal art casting that ranges from small sculptures to multimillion-dollar projects.

The 12 years of efforts by various groups in Seaside are being recognized by the Oregon Recreation and Parks Association.

The Seaside Skate ‘N Ride Park is being awarded the 2007 Design of the Year. The park opened for use in June.

“All the things came together and it has really become a focal point in the community,” said Mary Blake, director of Sunset Empire Park and Recreation District. “This was a big project for a small community.”

50 years ago — 1967

The Astor family is proud of its ancestor John Jacob Astor and considers founding of Astoria his crowning achievement, Gavin Astor, his fifth generation descendant, told 350 people who crowded the new Astor Library for its dedication Sunday afternoon.

Astor, who came with his wife, Lady Irene, from London for the dedication ceremonies, shared speaking honors with Gov. Tom McCall, who flew from Salem.

“We are delighted to share in this library dedication, and congratulate all concerned,” Astor said. “This is really a lovely building.”

Astor noted that posting the U.S. flag at Astoria by his ancestor’s expedition was a major factor in establishing U.S. claims to the Oregon country and giving the United States a Pacific seaboard.

A self-styled spokesman for a group of county residents seeking answers to questions about the proposed $152 million Northwest Aluminum plant here accused the Port of Astoria commissioners of a “snow job” that could be removed by them answering the questions.

The commission in turn told Eben Carruthers of Warrenton that many of the questions were “silly and a waste of time” while they would attempt to answer those they felt appropriate after research. Carruthers was invited to attend the Port Commission’s meeting Nov. 14, during which answers to the questions will be given.

75 years ago — 1942

An inspection of Lower Columbia towns and highways by Army officers at the request of the Western defense command has exposed glaring weaknesses in local observation of the command’s proclamation ordering a dim-out, it was learned today from the state defense council headquarters.

The officers found that in Astoria, “requirements pertaining to cars driving in dim-out zones are not enforced; street lights painted on the seaward side are not blacked out, due to paint peeling off the lights; a large number of lighted windows visible from the sea did not have shades down.”

Scientific research is changing the face of the world and of everything we use, Edward F. Flynn, assistant to the vice president and general counsel for the Great Northern Railway Co., told the Astoria Rotary Club Wednesday. Flynn was introduced by Jack Wright, local manager of the Spokane, Portland and Seattle railway.

“It is no doubt safe to say that in a day or two at present, the world is spending as much to carry on its wars as the United States pays out in a year for research.

“If, when the war ends we shall spend in our country for research as much in one year as we now spend in one month for war, such great impetus will be given industry and the discovery of new sources of power and perfection and production of new medicines that will then be living in a really ‘new world.’ We will then not need to fear that any other nation will defeat us commercially or industrially in any part of the world.”

Chief of Police John Acton, acting upon receipt of complaints from motorists who are claiming pedestrians are careless in their travel over city streets in the dim-out, today issued a statement warning both foot and auto travelers that city police are prepared to enforce dim-out regulations with an iron hand.

“We are getting a good many complaints from motorists regarding this carelessness of pedestrians during dim-outs and wish to caution pedestrians that they must use extra caution in crossing the streets just as well as the drive must be extra cautious,” Acton said.



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