It was pouring rain and our friend Joe and his basset hound Columbo were stranded at our house in the storm. I offered them a ride home, but Joe politely declined.

I was baffled by his complete willingness to get soaked.

“Do you have an umbrella, perchance?” Joe asked.

Umbrella? Oregonians hate umbrellas, so I’d heard.

Joe was unabashed, so I poked around the trunk of the car and pulled out a collapsible blue umbrella, a remnant from our 3,000-mile cross-county journey last spring.

The magical whoosh of the umbrella as it opened —

Mission accomplished. Dog and owner were walkin’ in the rain in style.

On Manhattan streets, alas, umbrellas priced high and low are more often than not used to spear a pedestrian’s way through a storm, and metal sticks and shreds of umbrellas of all price points are routinely found poking out of trash bins upside down.

At Grand Central Station, people huddle under the awning when the rain starts to fall. Miraculously, on the corners, men of international descent magically appear selling $6 umbrellas. Those will get you from 42nd to 44th Street but then not much further.

At Brooks Brothers on Madison Avenue, you can like the “window-paned checked automatic” umbrella, priced at a reasonable $60. Nordstrom’s can supply you with an Italian-made Alexander McQueen bone handle umbrella for slightly more, $635, rain not included.

In China, the umbrella even became the inspiration for a political movement, inspiring democracy protesters in 2014. The umbrella not only protected protesters from the rain and sun, but served to deflect pepper spray and tear gas.

My favorite umbrella movie is “Les Parapluies de Cherbourg,” marked by the lilting and memorable Michel Legrand score. The melody “I Will Wait for You” plays throughout the movie as a young Catherine Deneuve makes young men swoon, all to the pitter-patter of raindrops and the subtext of the French/Algerian war.

Chicago’s Morton Salt girl, whose iconic umbrella is placed prominently along the Kennedy Expressway, is more than a century old.

Our son, who learned about rain at the University of Oregon, introduced us to Oregon’s anti-umbrella tone. There are no charming Morton Salt girls here, no umbrella democracy.

True Oregonians don’t use umbrellas, he averred, preferring to mummify themselves in rubber or latex or just flat-out get drenched. Maybe that’s why his Van’s sneakers were squeaking all the time.

We get it. While it’s been relatively dry since our arrival in May, even in the rain we haven’t had occasion to grab the umbrella. Standing on a look-out over Hug Point a couple of weeks ago in a windstorm was enough to set me straight. Gusts that can blow a car door off its hinges would churn an umbrella into bobby pins and shredded nylon with merely a breath.

Should you use an umbrella in Cannon Beach? The bigger the better, said Ann-Marie Radich of the gallery Found.

“For the most part day to day, wind and rain, umbrellas don’t do any good because they blow inside out,” Radich said last Sunday on the porch of Sleepy Monk. “We went to a Seaside Seagulls football last week. We thought we were prepared with stadium blankets — water repellent on the outside, fuzzy on the inside — rain gear, big-hooded Carhart rain coats, when it started to rain like nobody’s business. Somebody in front of us had a huge stadium umbrella my mom got to use. If you’re sitting still at a game where you can keep — I never would have thought — my mom had suggested we bring an umbrella — that would have been inside out before we were in our seats. But in that case, very smart.”

At the Stormy Weather Arts Festival this weekend, Cannon Beach once again jumps on — to mix a metaphor — the umbrella bandwagon.

Five artists will present four one-of-a-kind painted umbrellas to be auctioned off Friday, Nov. 6, but held in reserve until Saturday when they will be used in the Stormy Weather runway show, “Dancin’ in the Rain.”

Designing artists are Bonny Gorsuch, represented by the Cannon Beach Gallery; Dragon Fire’s Nancy Norman; Marianne Post, representing Primary Elements Gallery; Krista Guenther from the Coaster Theatre; and students from Seaside High School’s art class.

The brilliant 28th Annual Story Weather poster artwork was created by Ken Grant and presented by White Bird Gallery.

The event will help establish scholarships to local arts’ camps in Cannon Beach. the Cannon Beach Arts Association art camp for Kids, Coaster Theatre Theater Camp for kids, and Sea Ranch RV Resort and Music Camp for Kids.

The show is free and begins at 10:30 a.m., with clothing from Dena’s Shop on the Corner, La Luna Loca, Maggie & Henry’s, Fruffles and Dragon Fire Gallery. Refreshments are provided by Sleepy Monk Coffee and Sea Level Bakery.

“We wanted to make sure we had a really strong connection with the arts community with this,” Court Carrier of the Chamber of Commerce said.

We are delighted to see umbrellas finally getting their due. Their struggles against the elements in Cannon Beach are as iconic as the Rock.

Cannon Beach Photo has a website with 546 umbrella photos. Pelican Bay Brewing Co. brews an “Umbrella IPA.” Umbrellas. like kites, are magical museum creations — form and function majestically married to art and nature.

Just got word that my friend Joe just returned the little blue folding $6 umbrella. Use it in the rain? Fuggetaboutit. It’s a collector’s item!

Should you use an umbrella in Cannon Beach? The bigger the better, said Ann-Marie Radich of the gallery Found.

“For the most part day to day, wind and rain, umbrellas don’t do any good because they blow inside out,” Radich said last Sunday on the porch of Sleepy Monk. “We went to a Seaside Seagulls football last week. We thought we were prepared with stadium blankets — water repellent on the outside, fuzzy on the inside — rain gear, big-hooded Carhart rain coats, when it started to rain like nobody’s business. Somebody in front of us had a huge stadium umbrella my mom got to use. If you’re sitting still at a game where you can keep — I never would have thought — my mom had suggested we bring an umbrella — that would have been inside out before we were in our seats. But in that case, very smart.”

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