Astoria extends parks, pool closures

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Astoria is extending the closure of the Astoria Library, Astoria Aquatic Center and other parks facilities indefinitely amid efforts to limit the spread of the coronavirus.

The closures also include the Astoria Recreation Center, Lil’ Sprouts, Port of Play, playgrounds and sport courts. They were expected to end Wednesday, along with Gov. Kate Brown’s initial public school closures, which have since been extended through late April.

“Due to the constantly changing nature of the situation, the city has determined that the best course of action is to extend all closures to the public of facilities past (Wednesday), leaving reopen dates open-ended at this time,” the city said in a news release. “City staff are monitoring current conditions closely and are in regular contact with local, state and federal health authorities in order to be of most service during this emergency.”

City Hall will also extend its restriction of walk-in access, with admittance by appointment only. The city prefers business be conducted over the phone or through email as much as possible.

All scheduled meetings of the City Council, Planning Commission, Historic Landmarks Commission and Design Review Commission will be streamed live for video and audio. Visit www.astoria.or.us for the link and other updates.

Water bills, parking tickets, parking space reservations, renewals and more may be paid for over the phone. Customers may also place payments in the drop box outside of the main entrance to City Hall.

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