Check out these new arrivals at the Astoria Public Library, and visit the new Web site, www.astorialibrary.org

Although Lou Gehrig's record of 2,130 consecutive Major League games was broken in 1995, it is still a major achievement for any player. Jonathan Eig's biography, "Luckiest Man: The Life and Death of Lou Gehrig," shows that Gehrig was a misfit among a hard drinking and partying team led by Babe Ruth. His devotion to his mother and evidence that he was affected by ALS sooner than most knew is documented in this latest baseball bio.

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Dragon lore is alive and well in the hands of Anne McCaffrey's son, Todd. In "Dragonsblood," the dragons are threatened by Threadfall yet again. Two women, Lorana and Wind Blossom, separated by hundreds of years but bound by their passion for the dragons, search for a cure. "Dragonsblood" will appeal to Pern fans, yet is accessible to those new to the series.

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Fans of Richard North Patterson know how thought-provoking his novels can be. In "Conviction," he raises the question of capital punishment. Attorney Terri Paget finds evidence that Rennell Price should not be on death row. She has 59 days to convince the legal and political machinery of the truth. Ethics, politics and personal agendas are addressed in this intense, dramatic 13th novel.

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In Bill McKibben's "Wandering Home," he hikes from Mount Abraham in Vermont to Crane Mountain in New York's Adirondacks. Along the way, he discusses nature, wilderness and human habitation with various people. He also discusses living green with organic farmers and wineries, people producing biodiesel and beekeepers. This is another in the Crown Journeys series.

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Marjane Satrapi gathers her mother, grandmother, aunt, friends and neighbors for tea and conversation. The talk turns to those familiar subjects of men, sex, love and life in general. The lives of the women in "Embroideries" are by turns familiar, exotic and hilarious.

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As a child, Kathy lived a life of privilege and isolation at Hailsham, a private school. A reunion with two classmates brings up memories of discord and secrets. In "Never Let Me Go," Kazuo Ishiguro, author of "Remains of the Day," again creates emotional depth in a seemingly simple story.

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The food and meals of our childhood often create lasting memories. For Diana Abu-Jaber, food was an adventure. In "The Language of Baklava," she describes the food created by her immigrant Jordanian father in upstate New York and in Bedouin tents in the desert. Abu-Jaber includes recipes from the Jordanian and American sides of her family as a bonus to the reader.

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There are many aspects of the lower Columbia River that Lewis and Clark would recognize. Much of what has developed as a result of their exploration and Jefferson's goal of economic development of the Pacific Northwest would amaze them. "Two Centuries of Lewis and Clark: Reflections of the Voyage of Discovery," by William L. Lang and Carl Abbott, examine the effect of the voyage on the environment, people and landscape.

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In 1930, Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, a young Indian physicist, calculated that certain stars would explode and collapse "to virtually nothing." Sir Arthur Eddington, "one of the greatest astrophysicists of the day," thought Chandra's ideas ridiculous. "Empire of the Stars" is a dramatic story of astrophysics, black holes and clashing cultures. Arthur I. Miller explores the prejudice Chandra went through before receiving the Nobel Prize.

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"The Case for a Living Wage" asks some pertinent questions about the gap between the haves and the have-nots. Jerold Waltman examines the difference between a living wage and minimum wage, a fair wage and a just wage. Waltman compares the U.S. and U.K. approaches to the problem, the effect of society and religion on policy, and "explores the root causes of inequality and poverty."

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