Check out these new arrivals at the Astoria Public Library, and visit the Web site www.astorialibrary.org

Although definitely not a memoir, author Penelope Lively bases her new novel, "Making It Up," on her own life. When she examined the turning points in her eventful life, she chose to share with us the alternative stories that might have been had she made a different choice. Before and after each story, Lively gives us clues about her real life.

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Bill Merritt thought he had secured an acceptable job with lawyer Thaddeus Silk. The clientele were a bit odd, and the office chaotic, but Bill had faith. When Silk died unexpectedly, however, Bill had to pick up the pieces of this eccentric law firm. "A Fool's Gold: A Story of Ancient Spanish Treasure, Two Pounds of Pot and the Young Lawyer Almost Left Holding the Bag, a Biography," was written by Bill Merritt.

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Fantasy fills a new novel, "The 13 and 1/2 Lives of Captain Bluebear," by Walter Moers. In Zamonia, bluebears actually have 27 lives. But having met and dealt with hobgoblins, a spiderwitch, a troglotroll and numerous other creatures in his lives, Capt. Bluebear finds these 13 and 1/2 lives most interesting.

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Arapaho attorney Vicky Holden and Father John O'Malley are on the case in "Eye of the Wolf," by Margaret Coel. Three Shoshone bodies have been found on the site of an ancient Arapaho massacre. And Vicky's client, Frankie Montana, is the prime suspect in the killings.

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"In the Company of Crows and Ravens," by John M. Marzluff and Tony Angell, chronicles the many ways in which humans and crows live in our world. Crows and ravens are featured on the cave walls of Lascaux and feature prominently in literature. The authors discuss the historical and current aspects of how humans and crows interact.

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In his debut novel, "Immoral," author Brian Freeman has created a thrilling pursuit of a serial killer. Two beautiful teenage girls have disappeared from Duluth, Minn. Lt. Jonathan Stride is on the trail of the girls' suspected killer, but there are many illusions among the facts.

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Ruth Rendell chills her readers with "13 Steps Down." Mix Cellini, fascinated by a supermodel, has been stalking her to no avail. His elderly landlady has noticed his behavior is suspicious, and the supermodel is simply ignoring him. Mix seeks advice from his mentor, a serial killer dead these 50 years.

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It was a lovely evening when Katie Mackey took off on her bike. The weather was hot and muggy in the middle of summer in a small town in Indiana. What happened to Katie? And who in this small town is keeping such large and evil secrets? "The Bright Forever" was written by Lee Martin.

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"Kiss Tomorrow Hello," edited by Kim Barnes and Claire Davis, assembles essays and interviews by 25 women who are in midlife. Age can bring us change, wisdom and doubt. Love and sex, family secrets revealed, dealing with an aging body, letting go of your children and taking care of your aging parents are among the topics covered.

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Robert O'Harrow Jr. has a chilling tale to tell in "No Place To Hide." In a balanced and factual account, O'Harrow outlines how your personal information is being gathered on computers and sold for use. With GPS, grocery and prescription cards, cell phones and systems that allow you to contact a service from your car anywhere and anytime, Americans have given away their privacy in alarming ways.

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