Check out these new arrivals at the Astoria Public Library, and visit the new Web site, www.astorialibrary.org

Life isn't looking so good to Richard Winslow. He can't seem to find an optimistic thought. When a professional relationship with a student turns personal, the two take off in Winslow's classic Lincoln Town Car. During the trip, Winslow begins to see a glimpse of the promise of life. "Winslow in Love" was written by Kevin Canty.

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Oscar Wilde's "Intentions" was first published in 1891. In this new release, readers can again enjoy the insightful wisdom and brilliant writing. The essays center on art, literature, criticism and society. Wilde makes his case that the critic is as much an artist as the artist, serving as a virtuoso interpreter.

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Nineteen new essays by Wendell Berry are collected into a new book, "Citizenship Papers." Berry reminds us of our responsibility, and of the need for awareness of current issues. Can we trust that rational people are in charge in our corporations? Berry poses questions that should be carefully considered by all citizens, regardless of political affiliations.

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Covering the administrations of Theodore Roosevelt through George W. Bush, "Command of Office" details how war, secrecy and deception transformed the presidency. Stephen Graubard, Professor Emeritus at Brown University, analyzed the 18 men who have held office since Roosevelt's time. Graubard proposes that the dangerous concentration of power in one branch has diminished power in the other branches of government.

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Jon Katz moved to a rural farm in New York with 16 sheep, three dogs and two donkeys. In "The Dogs of Bedlam Farm," he describes how he expected his dogs to herd sheep gracefully. Instead, the dogs taught him that to have better dogs, he needed to become a better human. In large print.

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Often when a major sociological change takes place, we perceive it as sudden. But Malcolm Gladwell, author of "The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference," has a different concept. He believes that ideas, behavior, messages, products and our reactions spread out like a virus. Why was Sesame Street so successful? Why did people listen to Paul Revere?

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Kendra Ballantyne, fired from her L.A. law firm, takes up a new profession. "Sit, Stay, Slay" is the first title in a new series by Linda O. Johnston. Kendra becomes a pet-sitter, with a host of clients. The problem is that one of her clients has been murdered, and when a second client is murdered, Kendra is the prime suspect. In large print.

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Anne Marie Oliver and Paul Steinberg lived with a Palestinian family in the Gaza strip for six months. The intifada was beginning at that time and the authors spent the next six years researching and investigating the concept of suicide bombing. They have interviews with leaders and followers, and with a Hamas suicide bomber whose bomb failed to explode. "The Road to Martyr's Square" details their research.

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David Zinczenko, with Ted Spiker, tells you how to get that streamlined look in "The Abs Diet: The Six-Week Plan to Flatten Your Stomach and Keep You Lean for Life." Advocating exercise and a number of small meals per day using the 12 "powerfoods," the authors discuss fat and muscle and how each forms. In large print.

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