Check out these new arrivals at the Astoria Public Library, and visit the new Web site, www.astorialibrary.org

A classic text has been published in a new translation, "The Dhammapada." These teachings of the Buddha, translated in verse by Glenn Wallis, are divided into two sections. The verses are presented first, with an overview and notes on each following in the second half of the book.

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Hannah remembers her life in Wendell Berry's novel, "Hannah Coulter." She talks about the young husband who died at the Battle of the Bulge, about raising children, about watching the seasons turn. The story is set in Port William, Berry's fictional town.

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When Flight 800 fell from the sky in 1996, a couple was videotaping themselves on the beach. The last moments of the airliner are on the tape. Now it is five years later, and two investigators want to reopen the investigation. They find corruption and shock at the highest levels. "Night Fall" is a new novel by Nelson Demille.

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Author Susan Vreeland offers readers more stories from the world of art in "Life Studies." Here, she concentrates on the friends and families of the great painters, offering us a glimpse of life close to the masters. Intermixed are contemporary tales of people who experience art in surprising ways.

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Cody Pritchard has been found dead. Sheriff Walt Longmire has to wonder if this is a revenge killing. Pritchard is one of four boys convicted of a brutal rape and yet let off with suspended sentences. Sheriff Longmire might have three more victims if he doesn't solve the case. "The Cold Dish" was written by Craig Johnson.

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Oregon's environmental history is rich in conflict. Rich in natural resources, economic concerns frequently oppose environmental concepts. William G. Robbins covers this history in "Landscapes of Conflict: The Oregon Story, 1940-2000." A professor at OSU, Robbins' first books covered 1800 to 1940 and 1850 to 1986.

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Carl Abbott focuses his historical lens on the 1905 exposition in Portland. "The Great Extravaganza: Portland and the Lewis and Clark Exposition" is now in its third edition. It showcased Oregon's and Portland's great natural beauty. New illustrations and a new introduction by Abbott are featured. It is worth checking out for the broad views of Portland's density a hundred years ago.

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David K. Shipler delves into low-paying, dead-end jobs and the people who work in them in "The Working Poor: Invisible in America." But he does not limit his investigation to employees. He includes those business owners who are anxious about thin profits and foreign competition. Hard work may not always cure poverty.

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Gathered in "Road Work" is some of Mark Bowden's best journalistic nonfiction. He in-cludes essays from abroad and stories from America. Some are sports stories, some humorous, others gripping.

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More than 900 years ago, Heloise and Abelard fell in love. Because his position at Notre Dame required a life of celibacy, their relationship was clandestine. When Heloise became pregnant, her father forced a marriage. Fearing for her life, Abelard had her sent to a convent and her father took his revenge. Abelard lived out his life in a monastery. In "Heloise and Abelard: A New Biography" by James Burge, more than 113 new love letters are brought to light.

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