Check out these new arrivals at the Astoria Public Library, and visit www.astorialibrary.org on the Web.

Maisie Dobbs started her adult life as a housekeeper in aristocratic London. After World War I interrupted her life, she began again as a private investigator. But all her cases seem to lead her back to the war years and the ghosts that haunt her from that time. "Maisie Dobbs" was written by Jacqueline Winspear.

• • •

Author Anne Lamott offers futher thoughts on faith in "Plan B." In the six years since "Traveling Mercies" was published, the nation has seen war and terrorism prevail. Many people also face personal frustrations. Lamott addresses these issues of faith.

• • •

Many questions about Islamic fundamentalists still haunt Americans. Hal Lindsey, a news commentator for International Intelligence Briefing, brings secular and Biblical history together in an attempt to answer those questions in "The Everlasting Hatred: The Roots of Jihad."

• • •

In the 1840's, Jane Kirkpatricks' character Marie Dorion Venier Toupin faces new and varied challenges. Her neighbors include British and American settlers, natives, missionaries, farmers and fur trappers. Her family is coming apart, and Toupin works to keep things together. "Hold Tight the Thread" ends the Tender Ties trilogy.

• • •

Henry Fielding, born in 1707, is considered one of Britain's first professional novelists. Although he only wrote four novels, all are considered classics. This new edition of "Amelia" was edited by George Saintsbury. "Amelia" was the last of Fielding's four novels, and there have been varying reviews over the years. Was Fielding, who was in declining health, able to polish Amelia as well as his other works?

• • •

Using the most questionable of public transport, travel writer Jeffrey Tayler traveled the lower expanse of the Sahara. He relates his adventures in "Angry Wind: Through Muslim Black Africa by Truck, Bus, Boat and Camel." Tayler encountered real dangers throughout his trip, but he also found the warmth and generosity of heart that is also Africa.

• • •

A new series by Tim LaHaye begins with "Babylon Rising." Michael Murphy, a prophecy scholar, is also an archaeologist who is not afraid of field work. While searching for ancient artifacts, Murphy finds a discovery that will bring him into conflict with evil forces.

• • •

Nina Beaubien Ross is sure she can supply the one need the all-girl band So Fine needs to succeed. She convinces her ex-boyfriend to sign the group to Suicide Records. While everything should be just fine now, Nina finds that things can quickly spin out of control. "Diamond Life" was written by Sheila Copeland.

• • •

Craig Childs chronicles a trip through the American Southwest in "The Way Out: A True Story of Ruin and Survival." Childs and his friend expect to spend two weeks in a maze of canyons, relying on the food and gear they can carry as well as their wits to bring them through. As the journey progresses, a parallel story of their past emerges.

• • •

Young, successful, and ambitious Nina Beaubien wants to be a writer. Her cousin Topaz has met with success as a singer, but nurtures a secretly broken heart. Keisha has some doubts about her life path, but she keeps them to herself. And Jade Kamura Ross has become pregnant on her honeymoon. Sheila Copeland tells their stories in "A Chocolate Affair."

Tags