Here it comes! The new school year is almost here. Children are excited, parents are relieved, and the Astoria Public Library has great new books about going to school. Students in all grades will find a school experience to relate to in these new books.

Going to first grade is a big change from kindergarten. The room is different, the things you do are different and the teacher is different. Horus found the same was true when he went to first grade. Last year on Mars, he was in martiangarten and there is a lot that's not the same. "First Graders From Mars," written by Shana Corey and illustrated by Mark Teaque, uses bright, colorful, humorous aliens to assure all tentative first graders that all will be well.

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Junie B. Jones has been getting into trouble. The problem is with her mouth. She seems to be saying the wrong things at the wrong times. This has been happening at home, at school in her kindergarten class and on the school bus. Follow the fun in "Junie B. Jones and Her Big Fat Mouth" by Barbara Park.

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Each new school year brings an opportunity to make new friends. Sometimes friends know exactly what you need. It could be a pat on the back, a helping hand or a listening ear. After all, what are friends for? "39 Uses for a Friend," written by Harriet Ziefert and illustrated by Rebecca Doughty, celebrates friends with bright colorful illustrations to charm your children.

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Brigid loves markers. They're bright, colorful and some even have wonderful smells. After convincing her mother she would be careful, Brigid gets the markers of her dreams. But she got bored just drawing on paper and before she knew it, she was drawing on herself. It was only after she was done that she realized she had used the super-indelible-never-come-off-till-you're-dead-and-maybe-even-later markers. What will she do now? Find out in "Purple, Green and Yellow" by Robert Munsch.

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When Chip went on vacation, he fell in a strange pool inside a dark cave. When he came out he was invisible! Now that he's back at school, he finds that being invisible can have its advantages. Together with his friends Justin and Charlene, Chip uses his invisibility to solve mysteries. Here's the first in the Invisible Inc. series "The Schoolyard Mystery" by Elizabeth Levy.

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Have your kids been sleeping in this summer? Getting up in time for school can be a real challenge. It was for Amy. Her family just couldn't seem to wake her up. So they brought her to school in her bed. Children will laugh as people try to wake Amy in "Get Out of Bed!," written by Robert Munsch and illustrated by Alan and Lea Daniel.

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Tess and Gus are waiting for the school bus. This will be the first time Tess will ride in one, but she doesn't know what a school bus looks like. Brightly colored pictures with humorous details bring each page alive as Gus answers Tess's question, "Is this the bus for us, Gus?" "The Bus for Us" is written and illustrated by Suzanne Bloom.

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The kids in Miss Nelson's room were misbehaving again. It didn't matter what Miss Nelson did; the kids just wouldn't listen. Then one day Miss Nelson was absent, and their substitute was Miss Viola Swamp. Miss Swamp was so mean the kids were convinced she was a witch. Miss Nelson was also gone the next day, and then the next. Will she ever return and free them from Miss Swamp? Find out in "Miss Nelson is Missing" written by Harry Allard illustrated by James Marshall.

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Benjamin wanted to bring something really special for show-and-tell, so he put his baby sister in his backpack and headed off to school. All went well until his sister woke up and started crying. What noise! His teacher, a doctor and even the principal tried to get her to stop. Nothing worked. Find out what happens in "Show and Tell" written by Robert Munsch and illustrated by Michael Martchenko.

- Patty Skinner, senior assistant librarian, Astoria Public Library

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