Check out these new books for children and teens at the Astoria Public Library:

Hondo the dog is spending the day with a friend at the beach. Fabian the cat is staying at home to play with the baby. Both have a day full of trouble and fun. Young children will appreciate these precocious pets in "Hondo and Fabian," written and illustrated by Peter McCarty. A Caldecott Honor Award winner for best illustrations, this book is recommended for children ages 2 to 5.

• • •

The good news is that Walter has lost a tooth. The bad news is that he lost his lost tooth. The good news is that the tooth fairy came to see him anyway. The bad news is that the rule says "No Tooth, No Quarter." The worst news is that the Tooth Fairy will lose her wings when Queen Denteena finds out she has returned home without a tooth. Can Walter help? Walter discovers sparkling white buildings made of teeth and a way to appease Queen Denteena when he travels to Tooth Fairy Land to try to explain the situation in "No Tooth, No Quarter!" written by Jon Buller and Susan Schade. This is a beginning reader book recommended for children in second and third grades.

• • •

Before children can read, you may notice them following your finger as you point out the words. They may even memorize a story they've heard many times. Even though such behaviors require considerable patience from adults, they should be encouraged. They are important milestones in language development that lead to strong reading skills. Motivating those children who love things that go, "Wheels!," written by Anne Cobb and illustrated by Davy Jones, is a great read aloud book. Through brightly colored illustrations, rhythm and rhyme, children in preschool and kindergarten will apply these important skills and go on the road to reading.

• • •

The United States of America has had 43 presidents. Can you name them all? Now kids in grades 3 through 6 can impress family and friends as they list all the presidents in the order in which they served. "Yo, Millard Fillmore! And All Those Other Presidents You Don't Know," written by Will Cleveland and Mark Alvarez and illustrated by Tate Nation, is a book that will show them how. Crazy cartoons about washing machines, ray guns, hairy vans and more create a funny nonsense tale about the presidents who are impossible to forget.

• • •

It seemed that World War II would never end. Thousands of people were dying every day. Scientists in the United States spent three years on a project that seemed to be the only solution to end the fighting. In her book, "The Manhattan Project and the Atomic Bomb in American History," Doreen Gonzales examines the creation of this powerful weapon and its place in the history of the United States and the rest of the world. She also looks at the political, scientific and social issues of the bomb then and now. This book is recommended for youth in grades 5 through 8.

• • •

In October 1962, Fidel Castro convinced the Soviet Union that the United States was planning to attack Cuba. The Soviet response was to send nuclear missiles to Cuba and aim them at the United States. With the threat of such weapons only 90 miles from the American coast, President John F. Kennedy faced one of the most dangerous showdowns of the Cold War. In "The Cuban Missile Crisis in American History," Paul Brubaker examines the personalities involved and shows how diplomacy and quick thinking put an end to crisis tensions. This book is recommended for youth in grades in grades 5 through 8.

• • •

His name is forever linked to a theory that has permeated scientific thought for generations. Charles Darwin was not the first to think of a theory of evolution, but he is famous for his contributions to its development. The man, his study and his contribution to world history are examined in "Charles Darwin" edited by Don Nardo. Part of the People Who Made History series, this book is recommended for teens in grades 8 through 12.

• • •

In six terrifying days, individual stock investors lost more than $25 billion. The stock market crash of 1929 put millions out of work. The country and the stock market have never been the same. Wall Street Journal chief editor Karen Blumenthal describes causes and effects, key players and events and recounts personal experiences dealing with the sudden lost of income in "Six Days in October: The Stock Market Crash of 1929." This book is recommended for teens in grades 8 through 12 and is the winner of the Robert Sibert Honor Award for best informational book.

- Patty Skinner, senior library assistant, Astoria Public Library

Tags

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.