Check out these new books at the Astoria Public Library:

Science writer Mary Roach chose cadavers as the subject of her new nonfiction book, "Stiff: the curious life of human cadavers." From medieval times to the present, Roach traces how cadavers have contributed to the inventions and conventions of scientific discovery.

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When Joni Rodgers discovered she had cancer, she was living in Houston. Her memoir, "Bald in the Land of Big Hair," spares no details. She relays the indignities of cancer and all it entails with wit and wisdom. Readers will be laughing and crying. Ultimately, Rodgers reports that her hair did grow back.

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In 1945, Elizabeth Bently disclosed her secrets - she had been a spy for the KGB and the director of two of the largest spy rings in America. There were more than 80 people in her operation, most of them government employees. Dubbed "the Red Spy Queen," she was the star witness in the McCarthy Era. "Clever Girl" was written by Lauren Kessler.

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Seattle firefighter and author Earl Emerson offers readers his newest thriller, "Into The Inferno." A group of firefighters from North Bend Fire and Rescue respond to a freeway accident. One of the vehicles is carrying an unmarked substance and six months later the firefighters who were at the scene are succumbing to a mysterious disease that kills within a week.

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Set in Holland in the 17th century, Jane Stevenson's newest novel, "The Winter Queen," is the first in a planned trilogy. History and politics mix in a love story featuring two royal exiles. Elizabeth of Bohemia is the Winter Queen and her lover, a former African prince with shamanic gifts, endure the intricacies and plots for power.

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Just after achieving its freedom, America was in enormous debt. The country's leaders decided to sell its largest asset, the land west of the Ohio River. But first it had to be surveyed, measured and mapped. And before that could happen, the new country had to choose a uniform set of measurements. "Measuring America," by Andro Linklater, is the story of that process.

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Miss Zukas, the amateur sleuth/librarian of Bellehaven, is on the trail when a corpse is found in her neighbor's garden. Then the police chief is found injured in an attempt to see him dead and Miss Zukas has to find the murderer. "Miss Zukas Shelves the Evidence" is the latest in this new detective series by Jo Dereske.

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Susan Sontag examines the effect of visual depictions of violence in her new book, "Regarding the Pain of Others." When we view pictures of war and disaster, do they inspire dissent? Or foster further violence? Or create apathy? Her essays discuss how war is waged and understood, both now in our time and in historical examples.

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Mercedes Lackey offers a new novel of Valdemar in "Exile's Honor." From humble beginnings and a low birth in Karse, a warrior had distinguished himself in the army of Karse. He had mastered every weapon and proved himself a formidable adversary, so that he was promoted over others. With that target on his back, he ends up exiled in the land he has always feared, Valdemar.

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Nancy Pearl has a book recommendation for every mood, every moment and every reason in "Book Lust." Pearl, a Seattle librarian, has organized her lists into 175 headings that guarantee you will find the right book for the right need, including Kitchen Sink Poetry. Throughout, the vivacious Pearl offers delightful commentary as well as solid suggestions for a good read.

- Jane Tucker, librarian, Astoria Public Library

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