Check out these new arrivals at the Astoria Public Library:

Eva Emery Dye was one of Oregon's first literary women. Determined to write historical fiction, she immortalized Sacagawea. She worked tirelessly for women's suffrage and was an advocate of lifelong education. The first biography of this remarkable woman is "Eva Emery Dye: Romance with the West," by Sheri Bartlett Browne.

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If allergies and asthma are bothering your family, check out "My House Is Killing Me," by Jeffrey C. May. Runny noses, itchy eyes and breathing difficulties can arise from the myriad unseen insects, mold, bacteria and yeast infesting our homes. Practical advice is offered for all major living areas such as the living room and bedroom, and a list of resources has been included.

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When ex-intelligence officer Paul Christopher goes missing and is presumed dead, five of his ex-intelligence buddies get together to uncover the truth. The "Old Boys" go around the world in their search, pursued by both American intelligence and terrorists alike. "Old Boys" was written by master spy novelist Charles McCarry.

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As so often happens, love has likely turned to murder in "Invisible Eden," by Maria Flook. Flook investigates the murder of Christa Worthington, an internationally known fashion writer who moved to Cape Cod for a simpler life. The book was written during the investigation of this murder, which remains unsolved.

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Sarah Micklem offers readers "Firethorn," the first volume in a new trilogy. After fleeing to the forest to live, Firethorn re-emerges into the world. While in the forest, she learned healing arts which would come in useful as the army readies for war. In the vast camp that is Marchfield, Firethorn waits with the other women, using her gifts to ease the pains of the other women and of the man she loves.

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Can an individual act of conscience by an ordinary person change the world? Bill Shore illustrates his belief that it does, every day, in "The Light of Conscience." Using moments in history, Shore illustrates that an individual act of conscience can echo from one generation to the next. In a world where the gray areas seem to be increasing, the decision to speak or be silent, to remember or forget, to sit or stand transforms individuals and the communities surrounding them.

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A new epic series by R. Scott Bakker opens with "The Darkness that Comes Before." The world has been through an apocalyptic past, and now the armies are gathering for a great crusade. Many thousands are gathered together, but only four are chosen by a mysterious traveler. Two men and two women will mix their fate with his in the new series, "The Prince of Nothing."

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Walter Abish confronts his past in "Double Vision." In the first part of the book, Abish recounts his family's harrowing flight from Germany in the 1930s. Over the next few years, Abish and his family fled to France, then to Shanghai and again to Israel. In the second part of the book, Abish returns to Germany in the 1980s, setting foot on German soil for the first time in 50 years.

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"The Half Brother," by Norwegian author Lars Saabye Christensen, has been translated for the American reader. The novel spans several generations and is narrated by Barnum, who is a half brother of Fred. Barnum has become a screenwriter, but is also immersed in alcohol. Are his words true, or is his love of lying telling the tale?

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E. L. Doctorow takes on the short story in "Sweet Land Stories." The stories are set across the United States and deal with the lives of ordinary people. All the stories exhibit Doctorow's power as a novelist and two of the stories have already won awards.

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