Oregon State design students share their hard work, exquisite skills at annual fashion show

Friends, family, loved ones and even some scouting designers gathered around the catwalk in the CH2M Hill Alumni Center Friday night to see what 25 design-and-human-environment students could do.

The theme for the 10th annual School of Design and Human Environment Spring Fashion Show was Gilded Noir, but student designs were not obligated to stick to the theme.

The 25 student-design collections ranged from three to six outfits, each following their own theme, which they formulated with the help of peers and instructors at the start of the two-term process.

Minjeong Kim, the associate dean for SDHE, said this voluntary, annual event is a great way for students to practice their art and flaunt their skills.

"This is a perfect example of experiential learning," Kim said. "They learn all these things by doing it all by themselves."

Students noted that this year, the designers had more assistance from instructors and judges than previous years, which helped students fine-tune their ideas and skillsets.

Shavonne Schumacher, a 2012 alumna of Oregon State's apparel design program, said partnership between instructors and students is what really makes the fashion show shine each year.

"It is a combination," Schumacher said. "I know this year they had a judge there for the designers to go and consult, which was great and I think that showed through in the collections."

Lilly Ewert, a senior in apparel design and a designer for the 2014 fashion show, said the availability of instructors helped her continue to progress her design skills, on top of her experiences in the 2013 fashion show.

"This year was better," Ewert said. "I knew more what to expect, I guess. The most exciting (part) is just seeing everyone's stuff."

Ewert added that the camaraderie of working together in the sewing lab and seeing everyone's hard work pay off was the best part of the fashion show process.

"It's awesome," she said. "This is such a cool thing we do."

Schumacher, who mentioned the Spring Fashion Show is her favorite event at OSU, enjoyed watching younger generations of designers show of their personal innovations.

"There's getting to be fewer designers that I know and it's still fun to see what people are doing," Schumacher said. "It keeps getting better as far as the judging and making the designers do more. That was really cool."

The judges for the show were not just for helping the students, though. After the audience saw each student's collection, eight awards were given out to students whose designs stood out to judges in different areas.

Best Concept Delivery went to Hannah Mosman, whose collection theme was "Pilgrim Peaks."

Best Representation of the Pacific Northwest went to Abbey Tollefson, whose collection theme was "Modern Essentials."

Best Technique and Workmanship went to Christina Ngo, whose collection theme was "Garden of Eden."

Best Use of Technique, Innovation and Originality went to Tayler Worrell, whose collection theme was self-named, "Tayler Worrell Fall 2014."

Best Ready-to-Wear Interpretation went to Ali Denny, whose collection theme was "Floral Edge."

Biggest Statement went to Elisa Olsen, whose collection theme was "Black on Black."

Judges' Choice of Stand-Out Collection went to Rachel Draper, whose collection theme was "Through the Trees."

Best of Show went to Heidi Ellis, whose collection theme was "French Ballet."

Kaitlyn Kohlenberg

Campus reporter

managing@dailybarometer.com

Recommended for you

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.