The Astoria High School Hall of Fame will induct two recently retired coaches, Carl Dominey (1999) and Mike Goin (2002), along with nine individuals, one contributor and two teams Saturday at the Astoria Elks Lodge. All individual inductees or representatives will be introduced Friday at halftime of the boys basketball game between Banks and Astoria. A reception follows the game at the Astoria Elks Lodge.

The actual induction ceremony will take place Saturday at the Astoria Elks. Doors will open at 11:30 a.m., with a luncheon at 1 p.m. The luncheon/induction is open to the public, with seating limited to approximately 200. Cost is $20 per person.

This year's inductees into the Hall of Fame include:

Mike Goin - Only one other individual has been selected to the AHS Hall of Fame as both an athlete and a coach - Wally Palmberg.

Former boys basketball coach Mike Goin will be the second individual on that short list. The retired basketball, track and cross country star joins Palmberg in the Hall.

Goin's tenure as Athletics Director and 400-plus wins as the Astoria basketball coach are still fresh in the minds of Fishermen fans as he stands eighth on the all-time school scoring list as a player, with 872 career points.

On the track, his time of 10:22.7 in the two-mile run would stand as a school record for a number of years.

As a junior, Goin co-chaired a fund-raising effort to give AHS what was believed to be the first all-weather track at the prep level in Oregon.

Carl Dominey - For three decades, Dominey built the Astoria track and field program into one of the elite programs in the state.

Astoria totaled 18 individual champions under Dominey's direction, and five times Astoria tracksters set state meet records.

The lone team championship came from the girls' squad in 1981, when Dominey was selected as the girls' Coach of the Year.

Astoria has won four district titles, all under Dominey's leadership. In cross country, his runners won 14 district crowns and 13 individual titles. Astoria teams qualified for state a remarkable 27 times, winning two championships and earning Dominey two Coach of the Year awards.

In 1993, he was nominated as state and national cross country coach of the year. Dominey can still be seen at local cross country and track meets, volunteering his time and service.

1942 Boys Basketball - Under head coach Wally Palmberg, the 1941 state champions successfully defended their title, defeating Corvallis 34-22 in the 1942 state championship game.

Photo Courtesy "Towards One Flag"

Astoria's 1941-42 state championship team. Front row, left to right: Coach Wally Palmberg, Stan Williamson, Pete Bryant, Ken Seeborg, Jack Love, Buddy Langhart; Back row: Ruben Wirkkunen, Don Hoff, Eben Parker, Cliff Crandall, George Crandall, manager Eugene Schaudt.The 27-4 1942 squad featured six future AHS Hall of Famers and nine players who would go on to play at the collegiate level, including Stan Williamson (University of Oregon) and Cliff Crandall, who became the all-time scoring leader at Oregon State.

Members of the 1941-42 Astoria team were Cliff Crandall, George Crandall, Don Hoff, Buddy Langhardt, Fred "Happy" Lee, Jack Love, Eldred Mittet, Duane Moore, Eban Parker, Kenny Seeborg, Stan Williamson and Rube Wirkkunen.

1990 Boys Cross Country - With one of the youngest and least experienced teams in the field, the Fishermen ran to a 49-point victory at the 1990 state meet in Eugene, the first cross country title for Astoria.

Sophomores Josh Long and Jeremy Matlock finished second and fourth, respectively, while junior Scott Atwood was seventh.

The team was also represented at state by senior Ian Kruger and freshman Dusty Atwood. Junior Kevin Goin and sophomore Peter Jackson rounded out the roster.

Long also won the Cowapa League title, and was named the team's Most Valuable runner.

Mike Meno, Contributor - From 1975-1988, Meno conducted - free of charge - annual sports medical exams for all Astoria High School athletes. He was also in attendance at home football and basketball games, and traveled on the team bus for all away games.

Meno gave much of his office time traveling to tournaments and state playoffs.

After moving to Ilwaco, Wash., in 1988, Meno served as Ilwaco City Councilman and mayor until 2002. He practiced on the Long Beach, (Wash.) Peninsula until March 2002, and has now joined doctors Tim Duncan and Sue Skinner in Astoria at the Lower Columbia Clinic.

Duane "Duke" Moore - Moore helped the Astoria football team to a 17-6-1 record in his three years with the Fishermen, in the early 1940s.

Moore scored 11 touchdowns his senior year, when the Fishermen lost just one game. In basketball, he played on the varsity team as a sophomore, and helped the Fishermen to two state titles.

Moore later played football at Oregon State, and was the head football coach at Beaverton High School, guiding the Beavers for 24 years, which included 21 winning seasons.

Martin "Cotton" Nelson - A 1913 AHS graduate, Nelson didn't come to Astoria until his senior year, after transferring from Portland's Washington High School.

In his lone year with the Astoria football team, he kicked a game-winning 42-yard field goal against Lincoln High in his first game, and later booted a 47-yarder against South Bend, a school record that still stands, 90 years later.

Nelson also played basketball, and later coached the sport at AHS, where he was 53-11 overall.

In track, he won the 880-yard run at the state meet in Eugene, becoming Astoria's first- individual state champion. He was later a middle-distance runner for the University of Oregon, where his time of 1:57.2 in the 800 stood for years as a school record.

Brian Paaso - The third member of the Class of 1959 to enter the AHS Hall of Fame, Paaso helped the Fishermen to a three-year record of 59-16 in basketball, and back-to-back Metro League crowns.

On the turf of Gyro Field (now John Warren Stadium), Paaso was an all-Metro football player, and in track set the school record in the 440-yard dash (52.4) at the state meet in Eugene.

In a league meet at David Douglas, Paaso jumped 21-3 in the long jump, and established a school record throw of 48 feet, 3 inches in the shot put.

Paaso earned several academic honors and eventually became one of the top doctors at Stanford University Medical Center.

Ted Schoenlein - An Astoria athlete in the mid-1970s, Schoenlein was an All-Coast League selection in baseball, football and basketball.

In his varsity baseball debut as a freshman, he struck out 10 batters and registered an 8-1 win over St. Helens.

Schoenlein was an All-League defensive back in football, and in basketball helped lead the Fishermen to a 20-5 record his junior season. He is 11th on the all-time AHS scoring list.

In addition to athletics, he was selected to Boys State, the National Honor Society and was voted Most Talented by his senior class peers. He also played a mean trumpet in the AHS band.

Greta Thompson - As a junior in 1977, Thompson led the Astoria girls golf team to the school's first state championship of any kind since the 1942 title won by the boys basketball team.

The Fishermen won by 24 strokes over runner-up Beaverton, with Thompson firing a four-round total of 173 to lead Astoria. She was the district medalist the following year.

Thompson played basketball as well, but not until her junior year, when she made varsity and broke into the starting lineup.

She was voted Most Likely to Succeed and Most Inspirational by her classmates, and later competed in golf at the University of Washington.

Dave West - In the early 1960s, West was all-state in football, all-league in basketball, and became the first Astoria thrower to record a 50-plus-foot effort in the shot put.

As a senior on the 1963 AHS football team, West was named team captain and started his third straight season at quarterback.

He was a first-team all-league defensive back, and gained all-state status as a junior.

In basketball, West earned honorable mention as a senior, scoring 211 points in 22 games.

His career-best in the shot put was 52-1 1/2, which stood for 13 years. West is still listed as the fifth-best shot putter in school history.

Andy Westerberg - Westerberg was a legitimate triple threat in the mid-1980s, earning all-league status in football, basketball and baseball.

Photo courtesy Astoria High School

Former Astoria running back Andy Westerberg, right, will be one of several individuals inducted into the school's Athletic Hall of Fame Saturday.Along with Craig Nelson, he formed one of the most potent running back tandems in school history. In the first game of his senior season, Westerberg set a record that will stand forever, sprinting 99 yards for a touchdown in a win over Hood River.

He was a two-year starter and tenacious rebounder in basketball, and was an all-league catcher in baseball, where he ended the 1985 season with a .333 batting average.

Westerberg moved on to Linfield College, where he helped the 1986 Wildcat football team to the NAIA Division II National Championship.

During that 12-0 campaign, he scored 19 touchdowns and was selected all-Northwest League Conference.

Gerry Wood - Wood scored 374 points (17.0 per game) in the 1963-64 season to help the Fishermen boys basketball team to a 14-8 overall record.

Included was a 40-point effort in a win over Clackamas, still second on the all-time AHS scoring list. At the end of his senior season, he was selected first-team All-Metro and All-State honorable mention.

Possessed with great leaping ability, Wood set a school record of 5-feet 11-inches in the high jump as a sophomore.

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