Beeswax

Craig Andes is a commercial fisherman and avid beachcomber.

No one believed Craig Andes when he said he found pieces of a shipwreck that resisted discovery for centuries in sea caves north of Manzanita.

But Andes, a commercial fisherman based in Tillamook County and an avid beachcomber, persisted. Samples of the timbers he found sticking out of the sand in the caves were eventually tested and dated. The timbers are now believed to belong to the wreck of Santo Cristo de Burgos, a Spanish galleon also known as the Beeswax for the valuable wax that formed part of its cargo.

Beeswax

A large piece of the Beeswax shipwreck was recovered on Tuesday.

Beeswax

From left, Oregon state archaeologist John Pouley, Nehalem Bay Management Unit Park Manager Ben Cox, SEARCH Senior Vice President James Delgado, and Oregon State Parks North Coast District Manager Justin Parker secure a piece of the Beeswax shipwreck onto a vehicle for transportation.

Beeswax

Porcelain from the Beeswax wreck.

Beeswax

The crew in the Beeswax shipwreck recovery party hiked to where pieces were discovered north of Manzanita.

This story is a collaboration between The Astorian and Coast Community Radio.