Global warming, energy independence should be part of the presidential raceThe environment is not seen as a pocket book issue. We won't hear a lot about it in this year's presidential campaigns.

We should. We ought to hear President George W. Bush and Sen. John Kerry say something about global warming. We also ought to hear about setting a goal of energy independence, which ties directly to oil consumption and relates to global warming.

The attorneys general of eight states put global warming on the front burner in an extraordinary letter to the editor of The Wall Street Journal, published Wednesday. Taking exception to a prior editorial page commentary that denigrated their lawsuits, the AGs argued that under "the well-established federal public nuisance doctrine," a state could sue to halt injurious conduct that's occurring in another state. At issue in their lawsuits are power plants, namely the five largest emitters of carbon dioxide in the nation.

Just as California has established an incentive for the manufacture of fuel hybrid vehicles, these AGs are playing a valuable role in our federal system. The states include Connecticut, California, Iowa, New York, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Vermont and Wisconsin.

In what could be a rebuttal to the president and his policy of willful scientific ignorance, the AGs wrote to the WSJ that, "The expense (of reducing carbon dioxide pollution) is but a fraction of the cost of coping with the devastation that could be wrought by global warming."

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