FISHINGPUBLIC MEETING: Hatchery winter steelhead program on Nestucca, Oct. 16, 6:30pm

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife will host a public meeting Oct. 16 to discuss the hatchery winter steelhead program in the Nestucca River basin. The meeting begins at 6:30 p.m. at the Oregon Department of Forestry, 5005 E. Third St. in Tillamook.

At the meeting agency personnel will present information from an on-going evaluation of two hatchery winter steelhead stocks currently being used in the Nestucca River. Agency staff will also solicit public feedback on proposed changes to the hatchery smolt release strategy. Public comments will be taken into consideration by agency staff when making a final decision on the proposal.

NORTH COAST LAKES:

Trout stocking is complete for the year. Angling in most lakes is likely slow to fair for leftover trout.

Anglers should use caution when heading to Lost Lake (Clatsop County) as active logging and travel restrictions are in effect. Call the Tillamook office at 503-842-2741 or Astoria Oregon Department of Forestry at 503-325-5451 for more information.

MID COAST LAKES:

Siltcoos and Tahkenitch Lakes (located just south of Florence along Hwy 101) are open to wild coho salmon retention until Dec. 31. The daily bag limit is one adult coho salmon and one jack coho salmon. Anglers are limited to retaining five adult coho, in combination, from Siltcoos and Tahkenitch lakes during the season. Coho fishing typically does not pick up until after the first big rains around late October. Trolling or casting lures and fishing bait from a bobber are effective methods. The coho fishing boundaries are as follows.

The waters of Siltcoos Lake open for coho angling are defined as that area upstream from the Highway 101 Bridge and downstream of the railroad trestle on the Maple Creek arm and the Fivemile Road crossing on the Fiddle Creek arm.

The waters of Tahkenitch Lake open for coho angling are defined as that area upstream from the Highway 101 Bridge and downstream of the first road crossing on the Leitel Creek arm and the ODFW Marker at the bridge on the 059 Road just west of Douglas County Road 49.

Warm water fishing is starting to slow down as lake temperatures cool: Devils Lake near Lincoln City and Mercer Lake, Munsel Lake, Woahink Lake, Siltcoos Lake and Tahkenitch Lake near Florence have good populations of warm water fish species such as large mouth bass, blue gill, yellow perch, crappie, and brown bullhead. Typically good fishing occurs from late spring through early fall for these species.

ALSEA RIVER: cutthroat trout, chinook

Even with favorable river and weather conditions recently the fall Chinook fishery has been slow to fair for the season. Angling has been patchy with fair to good fishing at times from the lower bay through upper tide water. Bright fish will continue to return throughout October. Fishing in tide water is the most effective until fish push up into the main stem river. Sea run cutthroat (Bluebacks) fishing has slowed as many fish have spread out through the main stem. Bank fishing and trolling in tide water with small lures (spinners, spoon or plugs) is very effective.

Current river levels

BIG CREEK: coho

A few hatchery coho should be available

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NECANICUM RIVER: chinook, cutthroat trout

Angling for chinook is fair in the estuary, and lower river. A few chinook have moved upstream with recent rains. Catch and release angling is fair for sea-run cutthroat.

NEHALEM RIVER AND NORTH FORK NEHALEM RIVER: chinook, cutthroat trout, coho

Angling for chinook and hatchery coho in Nehalem Bay is slow to fair. Fish are available throughout tidewater areas and the lower Nehalem River. Trolling herring or spinners in the lower bay is the most productive, while upper tidewater areas are best fished with bobber and eggs and/or shrimp. Hatchery coho have begun to enter the North Fork Nehalem River in low numbers. Catch and release cutthroat trout fishing should be fair to good. Small lures or flies should produce good results.

NESTUCCA RIVER AND THREE RIVERS: chinook, steelhead, cutthroat trout

Fall chinook are being caught in Nestucca Bay. Angling is fair to good. Some chinook have moved upstream with recent rains. Angling for summer steelhead improved with recent rises in river flow. Good numbers of fish should be available in lower Three Rivers and in the mainstem Nestucca. Catch and release fishing for cutthroat trout should be fair to good.

River levels

SALMON RIVER: chinook, coho, cutthroat trout

Fall chinook angling has been slow to fair for the season despite recent rains and favorable river conditions. Fresh fish will continue to return through October but not expected in big numbers. The hatchery coho salmon fishery has been slow to fair in tide water but expected to pick up some by the end of the month. Anglers can expect fair fishing for resident and sea run (Bluebacks) cutthroat trout. Bank fishing and trolling in tide water with small lures (spinners, spoons, plugs) is very effective. Bluebacks can be found throughout much of the main stem river but typically the higher concentrations are in upper tidewater and the lower river area.

SILETZ RIVER: chinook, steelhead, cutthroat trout

Angling for fall Chinook has been slow to fair. Fish are being caught in tide water and the lower section of the river. Bright fish will continue to show through October but all indications are that this year will be a smaller run. Steelhead fishing has picked up over the last couple weeks. The best harvest opportunity is in the upper river from Moonshine Park and in the lower river as a few later returns continue to pulse through. Resident cutthroat trout and sea run cutthroat (Bluebacks) fishing is good throughout most of the river.

Current river levels and forecasts

SIUSLAW RIVER: cutthroat trout, chinook

The fall chinook fishery has been slow overall but with fair to good fishing at times. Bright fish will continue to return through October with fishing in tidewater or the lower river from the bank being the most effective. Resident cutthroat trout and sea run cutthroat (Bluebacks) fishing is fair to good throughout much of the basin.

Current river levels and forecasts

TILLAMOOK BAY: chinook, coho

Fall chinook are being caught throughout the bay and tidewater areas, and the nearshore ocean when weather permits. Fishing has been fair to good. Trolling with herring is most popular in the lower bay and ocean, while trolling with spinners or large plugs is more popular in the upper bay. Bobber fishing with eggs or shrimp will produce fish in river tidewater areas.

WILSON AND TRASK RIVERS: steelhead, chinook, cutthroat trout

Angling for summer steelhead improved with recent rains. Fish are more active with increased river flows. A few fall chinook have entered the lower rivers, but angling is slow. Low numbers of hatchery coho have entered the lower Trask River, and angling is slow to fair. Bobber and bait or casting spinners will produce some fish. Boaters should try backbouncing bait or backtrolling plugs also. Catch and release fishing for sea-run cutthroat trout should be fair to good.

River levels

YAQUINA RIVER: chinook, cutthroat trout

The fall chinook fishery has been slow to fair with a few good days recently. Fresh Chinook will continue to return through October. Sea run cutthroat trout (Bluebacks) and resident cutthroat trout fishing is fair to good throughout upper tidewater and the mainstem. Bank fishing or trolling in tidewater with small spinners, spoons or plugs on light tackle works well for cutthroat trout.

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